Category: Music


Happy 100th Birthday Johnny Shines  JB Hutto & Ma Rainey

 

Ma Rainey

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Ma Rainey wasn’t the first blues singer to make records, but by all rights she probably should have been. In an era when women were the marquee names in blues, Rainey was once the most celebrated of all; the “Mother of the Blues” had been singing the music for more than 20 years before she made her recording debut (Paramount, 1923). With the advent of blues records, she became even more influential, immortalizing such songs as “See See Rider,” “Bo-Weavil Blues,” and “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.” Like the other classic blues divas, she had a repertoire of pop and minstrel songs as well as blues, but she maintained a heavier, tougher vocal delivery than the cabaret blues singers who followed.Rainey‘s records featured her with jug bands, guitar duos, and bluesmen such as Tampa Red and Blind Blake, in addition to the more customary horns-and-piano jazz-band accompaniment (occasionally including such luminaries as Louis Armstrong, Kid Ory, and Fletcher Henderson).

  Born and raised in Columbus, Georgia, Ma Rainey (born Gertrude Pridgett) began singing professionally when she was a teenager, performing with a number of minstrel and medicine shows. In 1904, she married William “Pa” Rainey and she changed her name to “Ma” Rainey. The couple performed as “Rainey and Rainey, Assassinators of the Blues” and toured throughout the south, performing with several minstrel shows, circuses, and tent shows. According to legend, she gave a young Bessie Smith vocal lessons during this time. By the early ’20s, Rainey had become a featured performer on the Theater Owners’ Booking Association circuit.” Continue reading

 

Discography

More videos

 

 

 

 

J B Hutto

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” J.B. Hutto — along with Hound Dog Taylor — was one of the last great slide guitar disciples of Elmore James to make it into the modern age. Hutto‘s huge voice, largely incomprehensible diction, and slash-and-burn playing was Chicago blues with a fierce, raw edge all its own. He entered the world of music back home in Augusta, GA, singing in the family-oriented group the Golden Crowns Gospel Singers. He came north to Chicago in the mid-’40s, teaching himself guitar and eventually landing his first paying job as a member of Johnny Ferguson & His Twisters. His recording career started in 1954 with two sessions for the Chance label supported by his original combo the Hawks (featuring George Mayweather on harmonica, Porkchop Hines on washboard traps, and Joe Custom on rhythm guitar), resulting in six of the nine songs recorded being issued as singles to scant acclaim. After breaking up the original band, Hutto worked outside of music for a good decade, part of it spent sweeping out a funeral parlor! He resurfaced around 1964 with a stripped-down version of the Hawks with two guitars and drums but no bass, working regularly at Turner’s Blue Lounge and recording blistering new sides for the first time in as many years.” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

More videos

 

 

 

 

 

 Johnny Shines

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Best known as a traveling companion of Robert Johnson, Johnny Shines‘ own contributions to the blues have often been unfairly shortchanged, simply because Johnson‘s own legend casts such a long shadow. In his early days, Shines was one of the top slide guitarists in Delta blues, with his own distinctive, energized style; one that may have echoed Johnson‘s spirit and influence, but was never a mere imitation. Shines eventually made his way north to Chicago, and made the transition to electrified urban blues with ease, helped in part by his robust, impassioned vocals. He was vastly under-recorded during his prime years, even quitting the music business for a time, but was rediscovered in the late ’60s and recorded and toured steadily for quite some time. A 1980 stroke robbed him of some of his dexterity on guitar, but his voice remained a powerfully emotive instrument, and he performed up until his death in 1992.

  John Ned Shines was born April 26, 1915, in Frayser, TN, and grew up in Memphis from the age of six. Part of a musical family, he learned guitar from his mother, and as a youth he played for tips on the streets of Memphis with several friends, inspired by the likes of Charley Patton, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Lonnie Johnson, and the young Howlin’ Wolf. In 1932, he moved to Hughes, AR, to work as a sharecropper, keeping up his musical activities on the side; in 1935, he decided to try and make it as a professional musician. Shines had first met Robert Johnson in Memphis in 1934, and he began accompanying Johnson on his wanderings around the Southern juke-joint circuit, playing wherever they could find gigs; the two made their way as far north as Windsor, Ontario, where they appeared on a radio program. After around three years on the road together — which made Shines one of Johnson‘s most intimate associates, along with Johnson‘s stepson Robert Jr. Lockwood — the two split up in Arkansas in 1937, and never saw each other again before Johnson‘s death in 1938.” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

More videos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Albert King*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* See our proper tribute Happy Birthday Albert King

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Albert King

 

 

 

 

 

Wiki Bio

 

” One of the “Three Kings of the Blues Guitar” (along with B.B. King and Freddie King), Albert King stood 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) (some reports say 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m)) and weighed 250 pounds (110 kg) and was known as “The Velvet Bulldozer”. He was born Albert Nelson on a cotton plantation in Indianola, Mississippi. During his childhood he would sing at a family gospel group at a church where his father played the guitar. One of 13 children, King grew up picking cotton on plantations near Forrest City, Arkansas, where the family moved when he was eight.”

 

 

 

” He began his professional work as a musician with a group called In The Groove Boys in Osceola, Arkansas. Moving north to Gary, Indiana and later St. Louis, Missouri, he briefly played drums for Jimmy Reed‘s band and on several early Reed recordings. Influenced by blues musicians Blind Lemon Jefferson and Lonnie Johnson, the electric guitar became his signature instrument, his preference being the Gibson Flying V which he named “Lucy”. King earned his nickname “The Velvet Bulldozer” during this period as he drove one of them and also worked as a mechanic to make a living.”

 

 

 

” King moved to Gary, Indiana in the early 1950s, then to Chicago in 1953 where he cut his first single for Parrot Records, but it was only a minor regional success. He then went back to St. Louis in 1956 and formed a new band. During this period, he settled on using the Flying V as his primary guitar. He resumed recording in 1959 with his first minor hit, “I’m a Lonely Man,” written by Little Milton, who was Bobbin Records A&R man, a fellow guitar hero, and responsible for King’s signing with the label.”

 

 

 

 

albertking

 

 

 

AllMusic Bio

 

” Albert King is truly a “King of the Blues,” although he doesn’t hold that title (B.B. does). Along with B.B. and Freddie KingAlbert King is one of the major influences on blues and rock guitar players. Without him, modern guitar music would not sound as it does — his style has influenced both black and white blues players from Otis Rush and Robert Cray to Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan. It’s important to note that while almost all modern blues guitarists seldom play for long without falling into a B.B. King guitar cliché, Albert King never does — he’s had his own style and unique tone from the beginning.”

 

 

 

” Albert King plays guitar left-handed, without re-stringing the guitar from the right-handed setup; this “upside-down” playing accounts for his difference in tone, since he pulls down on the same strings that most players push up on when bending the blues notes. King‘s massive tone and totally unique way of squeezing bends out of a guitar string has had a major impact. Many young white guitarists — especially rock & rollers — have been influenced by King‘s playing, and many players who emulate his style may never have heard of Albert King, let alone heard his music. His style is immediately distinguishable from all other blues guitarists, and he’s one of the most important blues guitarists to ever pick up the electric guitar.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Albert King left Bobbin in late 1962 and recorded one session for King Records in the spring of 1963, which were much more pop-oriented than his previous work; the singles issued from the session failed to sell. Within a year, he cut four songs for the local St. Louis independent label Coun-Tree, which was run by a jazz singer named Leo Gooden. Though these singles didn’t appear in many cities — St. Louis, Chicago, and Kansas City were the only three to register sales — they foreshadowed his coming work with Stax Records. Furthermore, they were very popular within St. Louis, so much so that Gooden resented King‘s success and pushed him off the label.”

 

 

 

” Following his stint at Coun-Tree, Albert King signed with Stax Records in 1966. Albert‘s records for Stax would bring him stardom, both within blues and rock circles. All of his ’60s Stax sides were recorded with the label’s house band, Booker T. & the MG’s, which gave his blues a sleek, soulful sound. That soul underpinning gave King crossover appeal, as evidenced by his R&B chart hits — “Laundromat Blues” (1966) and “Cross Cut Saw” (1967) both went Top 40, while “Born Under a Bad Sign” (1967) charted in the Top 50. Furthermore, King‘s style was appropriated by several rock & roll players, most notably Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton, who copied Albert‘s “Personal Manager” guitar solo on the Cream song, “Strange Brew.” Albert King‘s first album for Stax, 1967’s Born Under a Bad Sign, was a collection of his singles for the label and became one of the most popular and influential blues albums of the late ’60s. Beginning in 1968, Albert King was playing not only to blues audiences, but also to crowds of young rock & rollers. He frequently played at the Fillmore West in San Francisco and he even recorded an album, Live Wire/Blues Power, at the hall in the summer of 1968.”

 

 

 

” Early in 1969, King recorded Years Gone By, his first true studio album. Later that year, he recorded a tribute album to Elvis Presley (Blues for Elvis: Albert King Does the King’s Things) and a jam session with Steve Cropper and Pops Staples (Jammed Together), in addition to performing a concert with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. For the next few years, Albert toured America and Europe, returning to the studio in 1971, to record the Lovejoy album. In 1972, he recorded I’ll Play the Blues for You, which featured accompaniment from the Bar-Kaysthe Memphis Horns, and the Movement. The album was rooted in the blues, but featured distinctively modern soul and funk overtones.”

 

 

 

 

 

Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Bio

 

” In 1969, King performed live with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, forming what was called an “87-piece blues band.” During the early Seventies, he recorded the album Lovejoy with a group of white rock singers and an Elvis Presley tribute album, Albert King Does the King’s Things. King continued to tour throughout the Seventies, and in June 1970, he joined the Doors onstage at a show in Vancouver, Canada.”

 

 

 

” King’s sound underwent a major change in the Seventies, as he teamed up with the Bar-Kays and the Memphis Horns on the albums I’ll Play the Blues for You and I Wanna Get Funky. That partnership gave his music a much funkier sound than it had on his earlier recordings, and the former album’s title track became one of his signature songs. King also worked with Allen Toussaint and some of the Meters during this period.”

 

 

 

 

 

Cascade Blues Bio

 ”  If the annals are ever logged as to who the most influential guitar greats of all time were, then there would be no question regarding the inclusion of the three “Kings” of the Blues: B.B.Freddie and Albert. There is little doubt of the impact that each of these artists brought to the future sounds of Blues, Soul and Rock ‘n’ Roll. Albert King was a master of the single-string attack and was intrigued by Blues performers that he heard while growing up outside of Memphis. In turn, he influenced a new generation of guitar players that would include the likes of Jimi HendrixEric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan.”

”  On February 1, 1968, Albert King shared a bill that included John Mayall and Jimi Hendrix for opening night at a new venue in San Francisco called The Fillmore Auditorium. This popular music hall would become a second home for King, and later that same year he returned to record a live album “Live Wire / Blues Power” became one of the best-selling Live Blue! recordings ever and helped establishKing’s career further. Two other albums were released in the early 1990s that were taped during these same performances (“Wednesday Night In San Francisco: Recorded Live At The Fillmore Auditorium” and “Thursday Night In San Francisco…”  Though weaker than the original both serve as true testaments to the talents of Albert King’s guitar.”

” King continued to record with Stax, until the demise of the label in the mid-1970s. The output of this period included some strange mixtures for a Blues musician. In 1969, Albert became the first Blues performer to perform with a symphony orchestra in a concert that teamed him with the St. Louis Symphony. He recorded the album “Lovejoy “at Muscle Shoals with white Southern rockers and even released a tribute album to Elvis Presley, “Blues For Elvis: Albert King Does The King’s Things“. There was even an appearance on a comedy LP by Albert Brooks, “A Star Is Bought“. After Staxfolded, King would record for a number of labels that would include TomatoUtopia and Fantasy, until he decided to retire in the mid-1980s. Though Albert King had given up on recording, he still managed to find time to perform. He made cameo appearances on albums by up-coming Bluesmen like Chris Cain (“Cuttin’ Loose“) and Gary Moore (“Still Got The Blues“). He also made frequent stops at Blues festivals around the world, continuing to influence new generations of guitarists including Stevie Ray Vaughan and Robert Cray.”

” King played his final concert in Los Angeles on December 19, 1992. He died two days later at home in Memphis after suffering a sudden heart attack. After his funeral, a procession was led down Beale Street in a true New Orleans-style Jazz tradition, as the hearse bearing King’s body was led by the Memphis Horns playing “When The Saints Go Marching In“. King was laid to rest across the Mississippi River in the Paradise Gardens Cemetery in Edmondson, Arkansas, not far from where he spent his childhood.”   

“Albert King has been honored by The Blues Foundation with his induction into their Hall of Fame. Both “Born Under A Bad Sign” and “Live Wire / Blues Power” are also honored as Classics of Blues Recordings. But, the real honor for King is the love and everlasting respect that so many of his peers have given him. Stevie Ray Vaughan would call him “Daddy” and John Lee Hooker named him as one of his all-time favorite guitarists. Michael Bloomfield once said, “Albert can take four notes and write a volume. He can say more with fewer notes than anyone I’ve ever known.”  B.B. King stated in his autobiography “He wasn’t my brother in blood, but he sure was my brother in Blues.”  Albert King’s legend will live on.  Every time a Blues or Rock combo is on stage, in an arena or small nightclub, or just playing in their garage and grinds into “Born Under A Bad Sign” or “Crosscut Saw“, his influence will be shining true.”

 

 

 

” King died on December 21, 1992 from a heart attack in his Memphis, Tennessee home. His final concert had been in Los Angeles two days earlier. He was given a funeral procession with the Memphis Horns playing “When The Saints Go Marching In” and buried in Edmondson, Arkansas near his childhood home. B.B. King eulogized him by stating “Albert wasn’t my brother in blood, but he was my brother in blues.”

On December 11th, 2012, it was announced that King would be posthumously inducted into the 2013 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. “

 

 

 

 

 Albert Nelson King

 

    Apr. 25, 1923-Dec. 21, 1992

 

 

 

Discography

Albums

Born Under A Bad Sign

‎ ◄ (12 versions)

Stax

1967

 

Live Wire / Blues Power

‎ ◄ (11 versions)

Stax

1968

 

Albert King , Steve Cropper & Pops Staples – Jammed Together ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Stax

1969

 

King Of The Blues Guitar

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Atlantic

1969

 

Years Gone By

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Stax

1969

 

King Does The King’s Thing

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Stax

1969

 

Lovejoy

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Stax

1971

 

I’ll Play The Blues For You

‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Stax

1972

 

I Wanna Get Funky

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

StaxStax

1974

 

Albert King / Chico Hamilton / Little Milton – Montreux Festival ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Stax

1974

 

Travelin “To California

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

King Records (3)

1976

 

Truckload Of Lovin’

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Utopia (2)

1976

 

Albert Live

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Utopia (2)

1977

 

The Pinch

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

StaxEMI

1977

 

King Albert

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Tomato

1977

 

Albert

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Tomato

1978

 

New Orleans Heat

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Tomato

1978

 

San Francisco ’83

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Fantasy

1983

 

I’m In A Phone Booth Baby

‎ (LP)

Fantasy

1984

 

The Lost Session

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Stax

1986

 

Blues At Sunrise

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Stax

1988

 

Thursday Night In San Francisco

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Stax Records

1990

 

Wednesday Night In San Francisco

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Stax

1990

 

Red House

‎ (LP, Album)

Essential

1991

 

Crosscut Saw – Albert King In San Francisco

‎ (CD, RM)

Stax

1992

 

Mean, Mean Blues

‎ (Cass, Album)

Highland Music

1993

 

Albert King With Stevie Ray Vaughan – In Session ‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Stax

1999

 

Live 69

‎ (CD, Album)

Tomato

2003

 

Talkin’ Blues

‎ (CD)

Thirsty Ear

2003

 

The Big Blues

‎ (LP, Album, RE)

Sundazed Music

2012

 

Live At The Blues Festival

‎ (LP, Album)

Links

100 GREATEST GUITARISTS

MTV Biography

Albert King: inducted in 2013 | The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame …

Albert King, Mississippi Blues musician – Mississippi writers …

Albert King | Bio, Pictures, Videos | Rolling Stone

Albert King – Profile and Biography of Blues Guitarist Albert King …

Albert King Biography – Musician Biographies

Videos

Wattstax (1973)

Albert King – Live 1/7/78 Full Show

Albert King – Maintenance Shop Blues (Live 1981)

John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers 1982 Jam With Albert King , Etta James …

Stevie Ray Vaughan & Albert King in session 1983

Albert King & Stevie Ray Vaughan — In Session 2010 1983

B.B. King & Albert King – Japan Blues Carnival 1989

Albert King / Canned Heat Aussie Tour 1990

LiveLeak.com – Rock and Roll Hall of Fame – ALBERT KING

Interviews

Albert King – Interview

Albert King – Interview 2

Greg Koch On Meeting Albert King • Wildwood Guitars Story

 

 

 

Music

Albert King – King Albert Vinyl Records, CDs and LPs

iTunes – Music – Albert King – Apple

Albert King on Spotify

Amazon.com: Albert King

Albert King – Listen to Free Music on Pandora …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Ella Fitzgerald

 

 

Wiki Biography

 

” Ella Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as the “First Lady of Song“, “Queen of Jazz“, and “Lady Ella”, was an American jazz vocalist with a vocal range spanning three octaves (D♭3 to D♭6). She was noted for her purity of tone, impeccable diction, phrasing and intonation, and a “horn-like” improvisational ability, particularly in her scat singing.

Fitzgerald was a notable interpreter of the Great American Songbook. Over the course of her 59-year recording career, she sold 40 million copies of her 70-plus albums, won 13 Grammy Awards and was awarded the National Medal of Arts by Ronald Reagan and the Presidential Medal of Freedom by George H. W. Bush.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early Life

 

” Fitzgerald was born in Newport News, Virginia, the daughter of William and Temperance “Tempie” Fitzgerald. The pair separated soon after her birth, and Ella and her mother went to Yonkers, New York, where they eventually moved in with Tempie’s longtime boyfriend, Joseph Da Silva. Fitzgerald’s half-sister, Frances Da Silva, was born in 1923. She and her family were Methodists and were active in the Bethany African Methodist Episcopal Church, and she regularly attended worship services, Bible study, and Sunday School.

In her youth, Fitzgerald wanted to be a dancer, although she loved listening to jazz recordings by Louis ArmstrongBing Crosby and The Boswell Sisters. She idolized the lead singer Connee Boswell, later saying, “My mother brought home one of her records, and I fell in love with it….I tried so hard to sound just like her.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” In 1932, her mother died from a heart attack. Following this trauma, Fitzgerald’s grades dropped dramatically, and she frequently skipped school. Abused by her stepfather, she ran away to her aunt and, at one point, worked as a lookout at a bordello and also with a Mafia-affiliated numbers runner. When the authorities caught up with her, she was first placed in the Colored Orphan Asylum in Riverdale, Bronx. However, when the orphanage proved too crowded, she was moved to the New York Training School for Girls in Hudson, New York, a state reformatory. Eventually she escaped and for a time was homeless.”

 

 

 

Early Career

 

” She made her singing debut at 17 on November 21, 1934, at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, New York. She pulled in a weekly audience at the Apollo and won the opportunity to compete in one of the earliest of its famous “Amateur Nights”. She had originally intended to go on stage and dance, but, intimidated by the Edwards Sisters, a local dance duo, she opted to sing instead in the style of Connee Boswell. She sang Boswell’s “Judy” and “The Object of My Affection,” a song recorded by the Boswell Sisters, and won the first prize of US$ 25.00.

In January 1935, Fitzgerald won the chance to perform for a week with the Tiny Bradshaw band at the Harlem Opera House. She met drummer and bandleader Chick Webb there. Webb had already hired singer Charlie Linton to work with the band and was, The New York Times later wrote, “reluctant to sign her….because she was gawky and unkempt, a diamond in the rough.” Webb offered her the opportunity to test with his band when they played a dance at Yale University.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” She began singing regularly with Webb’s Orchestra through 1935 at Harlem’s Savoy Ballroom. Fitzgerald recorded several hit songs with them, including “Love and Kisses” and “(If You Can’t Sing It) You’ll Have to Swing It (Mr. Paganini)“. But it was her 1938 version of the nursery rhyme, “A-Tisket, A-Tasket“, a song she co-wrote, that brought her wide public acclaim.

Chick Webb died on June 16, 1939, and his band was renamed “Ella and her Famous Orchestra” with Ella taking on the role of nominal bandleader. Fitzgerald recorded nearly 150 songs with the orchestra before it broke up in 1942, “the majority of them novelties and disposable pop fluff”.”

 

 

 

Rising Jazz Star

” Going out on her own, Ella Fitzgerald landed a deal with Decca Records. She recorded some hit songs with the Ink Spots and Louis Jordan in the early 1940s. Fitzgerald also made her film debut in 1942’s comedy western Ride ‘Em Cowboy with Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. Her career really began to take off in 1946 when she started working with Norman Granz. Granz orchestrated the Jazz at the Philharmonic, which was a series of concerts and live records featuring most of the genre’s great performers. Fitzgerald also hired Granz to become her manager.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Around this time, Fitzgerald went on tour with Dizzy Gillespie and his band. She started changing her singing style, incorporating scat singing during her performances with Gillespie. Fitzgerald also fell in love with Gillespie’s bass player Ray Brown. The pair wed in 1947, and they adopted a child born to Fitzgerald’s half-sister whom they named Raymond “Ray” Brown Jr. The marriage ended in 1952.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 1950s and ’60s proved to be a time of critical and commercial success for Fitzgerald. She even earned the moniker “The First Lady of Song” for her mainstream popularity and unparalleled vocal talents. Her unique ability to mimicking instrumental sounds helped popularize the vocal improvisation of “scatting” which became her signature technique.”

 

 

 

 

 

” In 1955, Fitzgerald began recording for Granz’s newly created Verve Records. She made some of her most popular albums for Verve, starting out with 1956’s Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Cole Porter Song Book. Two years later, Fitzgerald picked up her first two Grammy Awards for two later songbook projects—Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Duke Ellington Song Book and Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Irving Berlin Song Book. She actually worked directly with Ellington on that album.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” A truly collaborative soul, Fitzgerald produced great recordings with such artists as Louis Armstrong and Count Basie. She also performed several times with Frank Sinatra over the years as well. In 1960, Fitzgerald actually broke into the pop charts with her rendition of “Mack the Knife.” She was still going strong well into the ’70s, playing concerts across the globe. One especially memorable concert series from this time was a two-week engagement in New York City in 1974 with Frank Sinatra and Count Basie.”

 

 

Worldwide Recognition

 

” Ella continued to work as hard as she had early on in her career, despite the ill effects on her health. She toured all over the world, sometimes performing two shows a day in cities hundreds of miles apart. In 1974, Ella spent a legendary two weeks performing in New York with Frank Sinatra and Count Basie. Still going strong five years later, she was inducted into the Down Beat magazine Hall of Fame, and received Kennedy Center Honors for her continuing contributions to the arts.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Outside of the arts, Ella had a deep concern for child welfare. Though this aspect of her life was rarely publicized, she frequently made generous donations to organizations for disadvantaged youths, and the continuation of these contributions was part of the driving force that prevented her from slowing down. Additionally, when Frances died, Ella felt she had the additional responsibilities of taking care of her sister’s family.

In 1987, United States President Ronald Reagan awarded Ella the National Medal of Arts. It was one of her most prized moments. France followed suit several years later, presenting her with their Commander of Arts and Letters award, while Yale, Dartmouth and several other universities bestowed Ella with honorary doctorates.”

 

 

 

 

 

” In September of 1986, Ella underwent quintuple coronary bypass surgery. Doctors also replaced a valve in her heart and diagnosed her with diabetes, which they blamed for her failing eyesight. The press carried rumors that she would never be able to sing again, but Ella proved them wrong. Despite protests by family and friends, including Norman, Ella returned to the stage and pushed on with an exhaustive schedule.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” By the 1990s, Ella had recorded over 200 albums. In 1991, she gave her final concert at New York’s renowned Carnegie Hall. It was the 26th time she performed there.

As the effects from her diabetes worsened, 76-year-old Ella experienced severe circulatory problems and was forced to have both of her legs amputated below the knees. She never fully recovered from the surgery, and afterward, was rarely able to perform. During this time, Ella enjoyed sitting outside in her backyard, and spending time with Ray, Jr. and her granddaughter Alice. “I just want to smell the air, listen to the birds and hear Alice laugh,” she said.

On June 15, 1996, Ella Fitzgerald died in her Beverly Hills home. Hours later, signs of remembrance began to appear all over the world. A wreath of white flowers stood next to her star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and a marquee outside the Hollywood Bowl theater read, “Ella, we will miss you.”

After a private memorial service, traffic on the freeway was stopped to let her funeral procession pass through. She was laid to rest in the “Sanctuary of the Bells” section of the Sunset Mission Mausoleum at Inglewood Park Cemetery in Inglewood, California. “

 

 

 

 

 

Ella Fitzgerald

 

April 25, 1918-June 15, 1996

 

Discography

Albums

Souvenir Album

‎ (10″, Album)

Decca 1949  

Ella Sings Gershwin

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Brunswick 1950  

Songs In A Mellow Mood

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Decca 1954  

Peggy Lee And Ella Fitzgerald – Songs From Pete Kelly’s Blues ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Decca 1955  

Ella FitzgeraldLena Horne , and Billie Holiday – Ella, Lena, And Billie ‎ (LP)

Columbia 1955  

Sweet And Hot

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Brunswick 1956  

Sings The Cole Porter Songbook

‎ ◄ (17 versions)

Verve Records 1956  

Sings The Rodgers And Hart Song Book

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve Records 1956  

Like Someone In Love

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve Records 1957  

Ella And Her Fellas

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Decca 1957  

Ella Fitzgerald / Count Basie / Joe Williams – One O’Clock Jump ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1957  

Ella Fitzgerald With Duke Ellington And His Orchestra – Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Duke Ellington Song Book ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1957  

Ella Fitzgerald With Duke Ellington And His Orchestra – Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Duke Ellington Song Book Vol. 2 ‎ (2xLP, Mono)

Verve Records 1957  

Ella Fitzgerald & Billie Holiday – At Newport ‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1958  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Duke Ellington Song Book, Vol. 1

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1958  

Ella Fitzgerald At The Opera House

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1958  

Sings The Irving Berlin Songbook

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1958  

Ella Swings Lightly

‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Verve Records 1958  

The First Lady Of Song

‎ (LP, Mono)

Decca 1958  

Hello Love

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Get Happy

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve RecordsVerve Records 1959  

Sings The Rodgers And Hart Songbook Volume 2

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Sings The Rodgers And Hart Song Book Volume 1

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Song Book – Volume One 

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Song Book (Volume Two)

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Sings The George & Ira Gershwin Song Book Vol. 5

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Gershwin Song Book Vol. 2

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Sings Sweet Songs For Swingers

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Gershwin Song Book Vol. 1

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Ella Wishes You A Swinging Christmas

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Verve Records 1960  

Mack The Knife – Ella In Berlin

‎ ◄ (31 versions)

Verve Records 1960  

Sings The Rodgers And Hart Song Book Volume 1

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1960  

Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Song Book – Volume Four

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1960  

Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Song Book – Volume Three

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1960  

Clap Hands, Here Comes Charlie!

‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Verve Records 1961  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Harold Arlen Song Book

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1961  

Ella In Hollywood

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve Records 1961  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Irving Berlin Song Book, Volume 1

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1961  

Ella

‎ (LP)

Brunswick 1961  

Sings The Irving Berlin Songbook, Volume 2

‎ (LP)

Verve Records 1961  

Ella Fitzgerald With Nelson Riddle And His Orchestra – Ella Fitzgerald Swings Brightly With Nelson ‎◄ (9 versions)

Verve Records 1962  

Rhythm Is My Business

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1962  

Ella Fitzgerald With Count Basie And His Orchestra* – Ella And Basie! ‎ ◄ (15 versions)

Verve Records 1963  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Jerome Kern Song Book

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1963  

These Are The Blues

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve RecordsVerve Records 1963  

Ella Fitzgerald with Rodgers & HammersteinLerner & LoeweAdler* & Ross*, Frank Loesser – Ella Sings Broadway ‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1963  

Hello, Dolly!

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1964  

Ella At Juan-Les-Pins

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1964  

Ella In Hamburg

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve RecordsStern Musik 1965  

Ella At Duke’s Place

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve Records 1965  

Ella Fitzgerald

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Metro Records 1965  

Ella Fitzgerald With Marty Paich And His Orchestra* – Whisper Not ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1966  

Hello Ella!

‎ (LP, Album)

PolydorBertelsmann Club 1966  

Ella Fitzgerald / Duke Ellington – Ella & Duke At The Côte D’Azur Vol.2 ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1967  

Brighten The Corner

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Capitol Records 1967  

Smooth Sailing

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Decca 1967  

Ella Fitzgerald / Duke Ellington – Ella & Duke At The Côte D’Azur ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1967  

Ella Fitzgerald’s Christmas

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Capitol Records 1967  

Ella In Concert

‎ (LP, Album)

Verve Records 1967  

Ella Live

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1968  

30 By Ella

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Capitol Records 1968  

Misty Blue

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Capitol Records 1968  

Walkin’ In The Sunshine

‎ (LP, Album)

Sounds Superb 1968  

Ella

‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Reprise Records 1969  

Sunshine Of Your Love

‎ ◄ (12 versions)

MPS RecordsMPS Records 1969  

Things Ain’t What They Used To Be (And You Better Believe It)

‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Reprise Records 1971  

Ella A Nice

‎ (LP, Album)

CBS 1971  

Ella Fitzgerald

‎ (LP, Album, Ltd)

SupraphonGramofonový Klub 1971  

Ella Loves Cole

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Atlantic 1972  

Newport Jazz Festival Live At Carnegie Hall, July 5, 1973

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Columbia 1973  

Memories

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

MCA Coral 1973  

I Maestri

‎ (LP)

Capitol RecordsEMI 1973  

Ella In London

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Records 1974  

Joe Pass & Ella Fitzgerald – Take Love Easy ‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Pablo Records 1974  

Ella Fitzgerald At The Montreux Jazz Festival 1975

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Pablo Records 1975  

It’s Only A Papermoon

‎ (LP)

S*R InternationalS*R International 1975  

Chick Webb And His Orchestra Featuring Ella Fitzgerald – Silver Star Swing Series Presents Chick Webb And His Orchestra ‎ (LP)

MCA Coral 1975  

Ella Fitzgerald & Chick Webb Orchestra, The* – Ella Fitzgerald & The Chick Webb Orchestra ‎ (LP)

Record International Service 1975  

Элла Фитцджеральд

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Мелодия 1976  

Ella Fitzgerald & Oscar Peterson – Ella And Oscar ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Pablo Records 1976  

Ella Fitzgerald / Joe Pass – Fitzgerald & Pass…Again ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Pablo Records 1976  

Basin Street Blues

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Intercord 1976  

Ella Fitzgerald With Tommy Flanagan Trio, The* – Montreux ’77 ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Pablo Live 1977  

The Rodgers And Hart Song Book

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1977  

Ella Fitzgerald & Cole Porter – Dream Dancing ‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Pablo Records 1978  

Ella Fitzgerald And Nelson Riddle Orchestra, The* – The George And Ira Gershwin Songbook ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1978  

Ella Fitzgerald With Jackie Davis And Louie Bellson* – Lady Time ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Records 1978  

Lionel HamptonCount BasieDuke EllingtonElla FitzgeraldLouis Armstrong – Original History Of Jazz ‎ (2xLP, Gat)

Amati 1978  

Ella Fitzgerald And Nelson Riddle Orchestra, The* – The George And Ira Gershwin Songbook ‎ (Cass, RE, Dou)

Verve Records 1978  

Ella

‎ (2xLP)

Lakeshore Music 1978  

Fine And Mellow, Ella Fitzgerald Jams

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Pablo Records 1979  

I Grandi Del Jazz

‎ (LP)

Fabbri Editori 1979  

Ella Fitzgerald & Billie Holiday – Ella Fitzgerald Und Billie Holiday ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

AMIGA 1980  

Ella Fitzgerald And Count Basie – A Perfect Match ‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Pablo Records 1980  

Ella FitzgeraldCount BasieJoe PassNiels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen – Digital III At Montreux ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Live 1980  

The Duke Ellington Songbook

‎ (2xLP, Album, RE)

Verve Records 1980  

Ella Abraça Jobim – Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Antonio Carlos Jobim Song Book

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Pablo Records 1981  

Webb On The Air

‎ (LP)

Jazz Bird 1981  

The Best Is Yet To Come

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Records 1982  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings Count Basie Plays With Count Basie Orchestra, The* – A Classy Pair ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Today 1982  

The Duke Ellington Songbook, Volume Two: The Small Group Sessions

‎ (2xLP, Gat)

Verve Records 1982  

Ella FitzgeraldJoe Pass – Speak Love ‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Pablo Records 1983  

Ella À Nice

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Pablo Live 1983  

The Ella Fitzgerald Set

‎ (LP, Mono)

Verve Records 1983  

Sings The Johnny Mercer Song Book

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1984  

Ella FitzgeraldDuke Ellington – The Stockholm Concert, 1966 ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Pablo Live 1984  

Sings The Harold Arlen Song Book

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1984  

Live And Rare

‎ (LP)

Delta Music 1984  

Ella Fitzgerald And Joe Pass – Easy Living ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Records 1986  

The Very Thought Of You

‎ (LP)

Contour 1987  

Sentimental Journey

‎ (LP, Album)

Hallmark Records 1988  

Ella In Rome – The Birthday Concert

‎ (Vinyl, Album)

Verve RecordsGong 1988  

I’ve Got You Under My Skin

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Success 1989  

For The Love Of Ella

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1989  

Ella / Things Ain’t What They Used To Be (And You Better Believe It)

‎ (CD, Album)

Reprise Records 1989  

Ella Returns To Berlin

‎ (CD)

Verve Records 1991  

Элла Фитцджеральд Поёт Произведения Дюка Эллингтона / Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Duke Ellington Song Book

‎ (LP)

Мелодия 1991  

Ella Fitzgerald With Nelson Riddle And His Orchestra – Ella Swings Gently With Nelson ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1993  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings Songs From Let No Man Write My Epitaph

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Classic Records 1994  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Songbooks

‎ (4xCD, Album, RE, Dig)

Verve Records 1998  

Frank Sinatra + Ella Fitzgerald + Antonio Carlos Jobim – A Man And His Music + Ella + Jobim ‎ (DVD-A, Mono)

Warner Reprise Video 1999  

Ella Fitzgerald & Joe Pass – Sophisticated Lady ‎ (CD, Album)

Pablo Records 2001  

Sings The George & Ira Gershwin Songbook

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Not Now Music 2010  

Newport Jazz Festival Live At Carnegie Hall, July 5, 1973

‎ (2xLP, Album, Ltd)

Analogue Productions 2012

Links

The Official Web Site of Ella Fitzgerald

Ella Fitzgerald – Music Biography, Credits and Discography : …

Ella Fitzgerald 1954Ella Fitzgerald, Brubeck, Coltrane and …

Ella Fitzgerald – PBS: Public Broadcasting Service

Ella Fitzgerald : NPR

Ella Fitzgerald @ All About Jazz

Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation

 

 

 

Concert Videos

Joe Pass & Ella Fitzgerald – Duets in Hannover 1975

Ella Fitzgerald and Oscar Peterson Live Paris Olympia 63 part II

Ella Fitzgerld Live at The Montreux Jazz Festival 1977

Ella Fitzgerald Live Jazz festival in Cannes 1958 part II

ella fitzgerald in berlin feat. freddie waits

 

 

 

Interviews

Ella Fitzgerald interview 1974

Bobbie Wygant Interviews Ella Fitzgerald

ELLA FITZGERALD BIOGRAPHY PART  Of 11

Music

iTunes – Music – Ella Fitzgerald – Apple

Ella Fitzgerald on Spotify

Amazon.com: Ella Fitzgerald: Songs, Albums, Pictures, Bios

Ella Fitzgerald – Listen to Free Music Pandora

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Goin’ Down” – Jeff Beck ft Beth Hart

 

 

 

—-

 

 

 

Stevie Ray Vaughan – Live at Montreux (1985) Full Concert

 

 

 

 

 

Published on May 26, 2014

Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble performing live at the Montreux Jazz Festival in 1985

Tracklist :
1. Scuttle Buttin’ 1:41
2. Say What! 4:03
3. Ain’t Gone N’ Give Up On Love 8:45
4. Pride and Joy 15:09
5. Mary Had A Little Lamb 20:18
6. Cold Shot – (with Johnny Copeland) 24:26
7. Tin Pan Alley (aka Roughest Place In Town) – (with Johnny Copeland) 30:00
8. Look at little Sister – (with Johnny Copeland) 43:21
9. Voodoo Child (Slight Return) 52:07
10. Texas Flood 1:03:07
11. Life Without You 1:12:07
12. Gone Home 1:20:24
13. Couldn’t Stand The Weather 1:26:05 “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

—-

Deanna Bogart On WFPK’s Live Lunch

 

 

 

 

 

Published on Aug 22, 2014

” The Deanna Bogart Band stopped by to promote their new album Just a Wish Away.

http://www.deannabogart.com/
http://wfpk.org/

Set List:
Bye Bye Blackbird
In the Rain
Maybe I won’t
Fine by me if it’s good bayou “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I Put A Spell On You – Larry Carlton & Robben Ford

 

 

 

John Mayer – BB King – Blues Guitar

 

 

 

—-

Happy Birthday Alexis Korner

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Without Alexis Korner, there still might have been a British blues scene in the early 1960s, but chances are that it would have been very different from the one that spawned the Rolling Stones, nurtured the early talents of Eric Clapton, and made it possible for figures such as John Mayall to reach an audience. Born of mixed Turkish/Greek/Austrian descent, Korner spent the first decade of his life in France, Switzerland, and North Africa, and arrived in London in May of 1940, just in time for the German blitz, during which Korner discovered American blues. One of the most vivid memories of his teen years was listening to a record of bluesman Jimmy Yancey during a German air raid. “From then on,” he recalled in an interview, “all I wanted to do was play the blues.”

  After the war, Korner started playing piano and then guitar, and in 1947 he tried playing electric blues, but didn’t like the sound of the pick-ups that were then in use, and returned to acoustic playing. In 1949, he joined Chris Barber’s Jazz Band and in 1952 he became part of the much larger Ken Colyer Jazz Group, which had merged with Barber‘s band. Among those whom Korner crossed paths with during this era was Cyril Davies, a guitarist and harmonica player. The two found their interests in American blues completely complementary, and in 1954 they began making the rounds of the jazz clubs as an electric blues duo. They started the London Blues and Barrelhouse Club, where, in addition to their own performances, Korner and Davies brought visiting American bluesmen to listen and play. Very soon they were attracting blues enthusiasts from all over England.

   Korner and Davies made their first record in 1957, and in early 1962, they formed Blues Incorporated, a “supergroup” (for its time) consisting of the best players on the early-’60s British blues scene. Korner(guitar, vocals), Davies (harmonica, vocals), Ken Scott (piano), and Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone) formed the core, with a revolving membership featuring Charlie Watts or Graham Burbridge on drums,Spike Heatley or Jack Bruce on bass, and a rotating coterie of guest vocalists including Long John Baldry, Ronnie Jones, and Art Wood (older brother of Ron Wood). Most London jazz clubs were closed to them, so in March of 1962 they opened their own club, which quickly began attracting large crowds of young enthusiasts, among them Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, and Brian Jones, all of whom participated at some point with the group’s performances; others included Ian Stewart, Steve Marriott, Paul Jones, and Manfred Mann. In May of 1962, Blues Incorporated was invited to a regular residency at London’s Marquee Club, where the crowds grew even bigger and more enthusiastic. John Mayall later credited Blues Incorporated with giving him the inspiration to form his own Bluesbreakers group.”Continue reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Discography

More Videos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday To Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown & Lil Ed Williams Of The Blues Imperials

 

 

Mr Brown starts us off …

 

 

Biography

” Whatever you do, don’t refer to multi-instrumentalist Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown as a bluesman, although his imprimatur on the development of Texas blues is enormous. You’re liable to get him riled. If you must pigeonhole the legend, just call him an eclectic Texas musical master whose interests encompass virtually every roots genre imaginable.

  Brown learned the value of versatility while growing up in Orange, TX. His dad was a locally popular musician who specialized in country, Cajun, and bluegrass — but not blues. Later, Gate was entranced by the big bands of Count Basie, Lionel Hampton, and Duke Ellington (a torrid arrangement of “Take the ‘A’ Train” remains a centerpiece of Brown‘s repertoire). Tagged with the “Gatemouth” handle by a high school instructor who accused Brown of having a “voice like a gate,” Brown has used it to his advantage throughout his illustrious career. (His guitar-wielding brother, James “Widemouth” Brown, recorded “Boogie Woogie Nighthawk” for Jax in 1951.)

  In 1947, Gate’s impromptu fill-in for an ailing T-Bone Walker at Houston entrepreneur Don Robey‘s Bronze Peacock nightclub convinced Robey to assume control of Brown‘s career. After two singles for Aladdin stiffed, Robey inaugurated his own Peacock label in 1949 to showcase Brown‘s blistering riffs, which proved influential to a legion of Houston string-benders (Albert Collins, Johnny CopelandJohnny “Guitar” Watson, Cal Green, and many more have pledged allegiance to Brown‘s riffs). Peacock and its sister label Duke prospered through the ’50s and ’60s.” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

More videos

 

 

 

 

Lil Ed and his Blues Imperials finish up the post …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Diminutive nicknames are common enough on the Chicago blues scene and in the case of Lil’ Ed Williams the “little” is even shrunken down. This hard-driving guitarist and vocalist is nonetheless a formidable presence in the former genre circa the new millennium and events such as his 2007 Rattleshake tour and album. By then Williams had led his Blues Imperials for more than 25 years off and on, inviting comparisons to the kick-ass blues-rock of Hound Dog Taylor & the Houserockers. The “lil'” fellow has a connection both stylistic and ancestral with guitarist J.B. Hutto, a uniquely rough-hewn performer in his own right. Hutto would certainly have been proud to see his nephew go from working in a car wash to teaching Conan O’Brien how to play the blues in a skit on national television.” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

More videos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

—-

Ready For The Blues – 22 Vintage Blues Tracks – One Hour Of Blues

 

 

 

 

Published on Dec 29, 2014

” Ready For The Blues – 22 Vintage Blues Tracks
♫ SUBSCRIBE HERE : http://bit.ly/10VoH4l
Find the album here: http://amzn.to/1D1r3gAhttp://bit.ly/1xqhSo0http://bit.ly/1Be5Grb
Join us on facebook : http://on.fb.me/1yY77w3
00:00 – Don’t Start Me Talkin’ – Sugar Blue
03:56 – Still a Fool – Muddy Waters, Little Walter
07:14 – That’s Allright – Jimmy Rogers
10:06 – My Babe – Little Walter
12:51 – Rock Me – Muddy Waters, James Cotton
16:05 – Shake the Boogie – Sonny Boy Williamson
18:53 – All Night Boogie – Howlin Wolf
21:11 – I’m a Man – Bo Diddley, Billy Boy Arnold
24:15 – I’m In the Mood – John Lee Hooker, Eddie Kirkland
27:25 – King Biscuit Stomp – Big Joe Williams
30:00 – The Blues That Made Me Drunk – Sonny Boy Williamson
33:02 – Chicago Breakdown – Doctor Ross
35:59 – Baker Shop Boogie – James Cotton, Willie Nix
38:44 – Evening Sun – Big Walter Horton, Johnny Shines
41:14 – Easy – Big Walter Horton
44:18 – Jump the Boogie – Papa Lightfoot
46:41 – Mambo Chillun – John Lee Hooker
49:36 – Standing At the Crossraods – Elmore James
52:24 – Saturday Night – Roy Brown
54:46 – Straight Alky Blues – Leroy Carr
58:09 – Chicken Hearted Woman – Clarence Samuels
01:00:50 – Sugar Mama – Pee Wee Hughes

  JazzAndBluesExperience – SUBSCRIBE HERE : http://bit.ly/10VoH4l (Re)Discover the Jazz and Blues greatest hits – JazznBluesExperience is your channel for all the best jazz and blues music. Find your favorite songs and artists and experience the best of jazz music and blues music. Subscribe for free to stay connected to our channel and easily access our video updates! – Facebook FanPage:http://www.facebook.com/JazznBluesExp… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yesterday We Were In Error With A Birthday . It Was Tommy Castro’s And Not Coco Montoya’s . Today We Make Amends.

 

 

 

 

Biography

” According to all the press and hype and hoopla for a time during the 1990s, Tommy Castro was pegged as the next big star of the blues. Long a favorite among Bay Area music fans, Castro — in the space of two album releases — took his music around the world and back again with a sheaf of praise from critics and old-time blues musicians alike. His music was a combination of soul-inflected rockers with the occasional slow blues or shuffle thrown into the mix to keep it honest. His vocals were laid-back and always a hair behind the beat, while his scorching guitar tone was Stevie Ray Stratocaster-approved. Crossover success did not seem out of the question.

  Born and raised in San Jose, California, Castro started playing guitar at the tender age of ten. Initially inspired by Mike Bloomfield, Eric Clapton, and Elvin Bishop, he started the inevitable journey into the roots of his heroes and discovered and quickly became enamored of B.B. King, Buddy Guy, Elmore James, Muddy Waters, and Freddie King. His vocal styling came from constant listening to Ray Charles, Wilson Pickett, James Brown, and Otis Redding. After playing with numerous Bay Area groups honing his chops, he landed a gig playing guitar for the San Francisco band the Dynatones, who were then signed to Warner Bros. The two-year stint augured well for Castro, playing to the biggest crowds he had seen up to that point and backing artists as diverse as Carla Thomas and Albert King.” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

More videos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today We Bid Happy Birthday To Bessie Smith And Coco Montoya

 

 

First a taste of Ms Bessie Smith ...

 

 

 

Biography

 

” The first major blues and jazz singer on record and one of the most powerful of all time, Bessie Smith rightly earned the title of “The Empress of the Blues.” Even on her first records in 1923, her passionate voice overcame the primitive recording quality of the day and still communicates easily to today’s listeners (which is not true of any other singer from that early period). At a time when the blues were in and most vocalists (particularly vaudevillians) were being dubbed “blues singers,” Bessie Smith simply had no competition.

  Back in 1912, Bessie Smith sang in the same show as Ma Rainey, who took her under her wing and coached her. Although Rainey would achieve a measure of fame throughout her career, she was soon surpassed by her protégée. In 1920, Smith had her own show in Atlantic City and, in 1923, she moved to New York. She was soon signed by Columbia and her first recording (Alberta Hunter‘s “Downhearted Blues”) made her famous. Bessie Smith worked and recorded steadily throughout the decade, using many top musicians as sidemen on sessions including Louis Armstrong, Joe Smith (her favorite cornetist), James P. Johnson, and Charlie Green. Her summer tent show Harlem Frolics was a big success during 1925-1927, and Mississippi Days in 1928 kept the momentum going.” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

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And now some Coco Montoya …

 

 

Biography

 

” Though he grew up as a drummer and was raised on rock & roll, Coco Montoya became an outstanding blues guitarist after stints in the bands of Albert Collins and John MayallMontoya debuted as a leader in 1995 with the Blind Pig album Gotta Mind to Travel and garnered an award for Best New Blues Artist at the following year’s W.C. Handy Awards ceremonies.

  Born in Santa Monica, Montoya played drums for a local rock band that toured the region during the mid-’70s, playing in area clubs. Although he had recently been turned on to blues at an Albert King show, he was somewhat unprepared to sit in with another blues legend — “the Iceman” Albert Collins — when a bar-owner friend of Montoya invited the bluesman to play at his nightclub. Though his inexperience showed, the young drummer impressed Collins enough to hire him for a Pacific Northwest tour three months later. The tour soon ended, but the pair’s affiliation remained for more than five years, while Montoya learned much about the handling of blues guitar from “the Master of the Telecaster.” ” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

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Albert Castiglia – Somebody Loan Me A Dime – North Atlantic Blues Fest

 

 

Published on Jul 17, 2012

” North Atlantic Blues Festival Rockland Maine July 2012 “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carlos Santana & Buddy Guy – Montreux Jazz Festival

 

 

 

Uploaded on Oct 23, 2006

” http://www.marinoshop.com.br – 1982 Drinkin’ TNT ‘n’ Smokin’ Dynamite (live) — Blind Pig (rec. 1974 Montreax Jazz Fest.)
Carlos Augusto Alves Santana (born July 20, 1947), known simply as Carlos Santana or Santana, is a Grammy Award-winning Mexican-born American Latin rock musician and guitarist.
He became famous in the late 1960s and early 1970s with his band, the Santana Blues Band, going mostly under the title “Santana,” which created a highly successful blend of salsa, rock, blues, and jazz fusion. Their sound featured his often high-pitched and distorted guitar lines set against Latin American instrumentation such as timbales and congas. Santana continued to work in these forms over the following decades, and experienced a sudden resurgence of popularity and critical acclaim in the late 1990s.
Over his career he has sold an estimated 80 million albums worldwide.

  George “Buddy” Guy (born July 30, 1936) is an American blues and rock guitarist and singer. Known as an inspiration to Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and other 1960s blues and rock legends, Guy is considered an important exponent of Chicago blues. He is the father of female rapper Shawnna.
Guy is known for his showmanship; for example, he plays his guitar with drumsticks, or strolls into the audience while jamming and trailing a long guitar cord.
Born in Lettsworth, Louisiana, Guy grew up in Louisiana where he learned to play guitar at a womens trucker convention[citation needed]. In the early ’50s he began performing with bands in Baton Rouge. Soon after moving to Chicago in 1957, Guy fell under the influence of Muddy Waters. In 1958, a competition with West Side guitarists Magic Sam and Otis Rush gave Guy a record contract. Soon afterwards he recorded for the Cobra label. He recorded sessions with Junior Wells for Delmark Records under the pseudonym Friendly Chap in 1965 and 1966. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy One Hundredth Birthday To Theodore Roosevelt “Hound Dog” Taylor

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Alligator Records, Chicago’s leading contemporary blues label, might never have been launched at all if not for the crashing, slashing slide guitar antics of Hound Dog Taylor. Bruce Iglauer, then an employee of Delmark Records, couldn’t convince his boss, Bob Koester, of Taylor‘s potential, so Iglauer took matters into his own hands. In 1971, Alligator was born for the express purpose of releasing Hound Dog‘s debut album. We all know what transpired after that.

  Named after President Theodore Roosevelt, Mississippi-native Taylor took up the guitar when he was 20 years old. He made a few appearances on Sonny Boy Williamson‘s fabled KFFA King Biscuit Time radio broadcasts out of Helena, Arkansas, before coming to Chicago in 1942. It was another 15 years before Taylor made blues his full-time vocation, though. Taylor was a favorite on Chicago’s South and West sides during the late ’50s and early ’60s. It’s generally accepted that Freddy King copped a good portion of his classic “Hide Away” from an instrumental he heard Taylor cranking out on the bandstand.

  Taylor‘s pre-Alligator credits were light — only a 1960 single for Cadillac Baby‘s Bea & Baby imprint (“Baby Is Coming Home”/”Take Five”), a 1962 45 for Carl Jones‘ Firma Records (“Christine”/”Alley Music”), and a 1967 effort for Checker (“Watch Out”/”Down Home”) predated his output for Iglauer.” Continue reading

 

 

 

Discography

 

Hound Dog Taylor & the Houserockers
1971 Hound Dog Taylor & the Houserockers Alligator Records
(84)
Natural Boogie
1973 Natural Boogie Alligator Records
(38)
Beware of the Dog
1975 Beware of the Dog Alligator Records
(33)
Genuine Houserocking Music
1982 Genuine Houserocking Music Alligator Records
(15)
Freddie's Blues
1994 Freddie’s Blues Wolf
(4)
Release the Hound
2004 Release the Hound P-Vine Records
(17)

 

 

More videos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2013 Chicago Blues Festival – Finale

 

 

 

Published on Jun 10, 2013

” James Cotton, Billy Branch, Matt Skoller, Lil’ Ed,, Eddy Clearwater, Deitra Farr, John Primer, Demetria Taylor, Felton Crews, Billy Flynn, Kenny Smith, Johnny Iguana.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday Shemekia Copeland

 

 

 

Biography

” The daughter of renowned Texas blues guitarist Johnny Copeland, Shemekia Copeland began making a splash in her own right before she was even out of her teens. Projecting a maturity beyond her years, Copeland fashioned herself as a powerful, soul-inflected shouter in the tradition of Koko Taylor and Etta James, yet also proved capable of a subtler range of emotions. Copeland was born in Harlem in 1979 and her father encouraged her to sing right from the beginning, even bringing her up on-stage at the Cotton Club when she was just eight years old. She began to pursue a singing career in earnest at age 16, when her father’s health began to decline due to heart disease; he took Shemekia on tour with him as his opening act, which helped establish her name on the blues circuit. She landed a record deal with Alligator, which issued her debut album, Turn the Heat Up!, in 1998, when she was just 19 years old (sadly, her father didn’t live to see the occasion).” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

 

Turn the Heat Up!
1998 Turn the Heat Up! Alligator Records
(8)
Wicked
2000 Wicked Alligator Records
(7)
Talking to Strangers
2002 Talking to Strangersalbum review Alligator Records
(13)
The Soul Truth
2005 The Soul Truthalbum review Alligator Records
(2)
Never Going Back
2009 Never Going Back Telarc Distribution
(2)
33 1/3
2012 33 1/3album review Telarc
(17)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Mance Lipscomb

 

 

 

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Saffire The Uppity Blues Women – “He Makes It Hard For Me To Sing The Blues” 6-7-09

 

 

 

Uploaded on Aug 8, 2009

” Sassy, irreverent, fun, & multi-talented are just some of the words to describe Ann Rabson, Andra Faye, & Gaye Adegbalola, otherwise known as Saffire, the Uppity Blues Women. Sadly they are parting to go their separate ways after something like 25 years as Saffire. This was recorded on their “Farewell Legacy Tour” stop at The Yale in Vancouver with Ann Rabson tastely playing the eighty-eights and singing this wonderful song.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee: Key To The Highway

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Mar 8, 2009

” Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee performing Big Bill Broonzy’s standard. Must be in the late ’70s. This has been shown before. I just edited it for my own needs… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Ms Holliday

 

 

 

Biography

 

” The first popular jazz singer to move audiences with the intense, personal feeling of classic blues, Billie Holiday changed the art of American pop vocals forever. More than a half-century after her death, it’s difficult to believe that prior to her emergence, jazz and pop singers were tied to the Tin Pan Alley tradition and rarely personalized their songs; only blues singers like Bessie Smith and Ma Rainey actually gave the impression they had lived through what they were singing. Billie Holiday‘s highly stylized reading of this blues tradition revolutionized traditional pop, ripping the decades-long tradition of song plugging in two by refusing to compromise her artistry for either the song or the band. She made clear her debts to Bessie Smith and Louis Armstrong (in her autobiography she admitted, “I always wanted Bessie‘s big sound and Pops‘ feeling”), but in truth her style was virtually her own, quite a shock in an age of interchangeable crooners and band singers.

  With her spirit shining through on every recording, Holiday‘s technical expertise also excelled in comparison to the great majority of her contemporaries. Often bored by the tired old Tin Pan Alley songs she was forced to record early in her career, Holiday fooled around with the beat and the melody, phrasing behind the beat and often rejuvenating the standard melody with harmonies borrowed from her favorite horn players, Armstrong and Lester Young. (She often said she tried to sing like a horn.) Her notorious private life — a series of abusive relationships, substance addictions, and periods of depression — undoubtedly assisted her legendary status, but Holiday‘s best performances (“Lover Man,” “Don’t Explain,” “Strange Fruit,” her own composition “God Bless the Child”) remain among the most sensitive and accomplished vocal performances ever recorded. More than technical ability, more than purity of voice, what made Billie Holiday one of the best vocalists of the century — easily the equal of Ella Fitzgerald or Frank Sinatra — was her relentlessly individualist temperament, a quality that colored every one of her endlessly nuanced performances.

  Billie Holiday‘s chaotic life reportedly began in Baltimore on April 7, 1915 (a few reports say 1912) when she was born Eleanora Fagan Gough. Her father, Clarence Holiday, was a teenaged jazz guitarist and banjo player later to play in Fletcher Henderson’s Orchestra. He never married her mother, Sadie Fagan, and left while his daughter was still a baby. (She would later run into him in New York, and though she contracted many guitarists for her sessions before his death in 1937, she always avoided using him.) Holiday‘s mother was also a young teenager at the time, and whether because of inexperience or neglect, often left her daughter with uncaring relatives. Holiday was sentenced to Catholic reform school at the age of ten, reportedly after she admitted being raped. Though sentenced to stay until she became an adult, a family friend helped get her released after just two years. With her mother, she moved in 1927, first to New Jersey and soon after to Brooklyn.” Continue Reading

 

 

 

 

 

Discography

 

New Orleans
1947 New Orleans Jazz Crusade  
(6)
 
  Billie Holiday, Vol. 2 1950 Billie Holiday, Vol. 2    
(3)
 
 
Billie Holiday Sings
1950 Billie Holiday Sings Mercury  
(20)
 
 
An Evening with Billie Holiday
1953 An Evening with Billie Holiday Decca / Verve  
(6)
 
  Billie Holiday, Vol. 3 1954 Billie Holiday, Vol. 3 Jolly Roger Records  
(2)
 
  Music for Torching 1955 Music for Torching Clef Records  
(6)
 
  A Recital by Billie Holiday 1956 A Recital by Billie Holiday Clef Records  
(1)
 
  Jazz Recital 1956 Jazz Recital Clef Records  
(0)
 
  Velvet Moods 1956 Velvet Moods Clef Records  
(1)
 
 
Lady Sings the Blues
1956 Lady Sings the Blues album review Verve  
(213)
 
 
Songs for Distingué Lovers
1957 Songs for Distingué Lovers album review Verve / PolyGram  
(217)
 
 
Body & Soul [Verve]
1957 Body & Soul [Verve] album review Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab  
(26)
 
 
Lady in Satin
1958 Lady in Satin album review Columbia  
(129)
 
  Blues Are Brewin' 1958 Blues Are Brewin’ Universal/Decca  
(0)
 
 
Stay with Me
1959 Stay with Me album review Verve  
(11)
 
  Comes Love   Comes Love Dazzling Dames  
(0)
 
  Lady in Satin: The Centennial   Lady in Satin: The Centennial    
(0)
 
  Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra   Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra Jazz Portraits  
(0)
 
 
Dove Collection
  Dove Collection Prism Leisure Corporation (UK)  
(1)
 
  100 Years of Lady Day   100 Years of Lady Day Documents  
(0)
 
  Magic   Magic Must Have Records  
(0)

 

 

 

 

More videos

 

Jazz legend Billie Holiday enjoys revival at 100

Billie Holiday’s 10 essential recordings in celebration of 100th anniversary of jazz great’s birth

Billie Holiday – About the Singer – American Masters

Remembering Billie Holiday

Billie Holiday at 100

For Billie Holiday’s 100th Birthday, Tributes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy birthday Billie , we love you .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday “Big” Walter Horton

 

 

 

Biography

” Big Walter Horton, sometimes known as Shakey Walter Horton, is one of the most influential blues harmonica players of all time, and a particular pioneer in the field of amplified harmonica. He isn’t as widely known as his fellow Chicago blues pioneers Little Walter and Sonny Boy Williamson II, due mostly to the fact that, as a rather shy, quiet individual, he never had much taste for leading his own bands or recording sessions. But his style was utterly distinctive, marked by an enormous, horn-like tone, virtuosic single-note lines, fluid phrasing, and an expansive sense of space. Horton‘s amplified harp work graced sides by Muddy Waters, Jimmy Rogers, Otis Rush, Johnny Shines, Tampa Red, and many others; he was frequently cited as an inspiration by younger players, and most accounts of his life mention a testimonial from legendary bassist/songwriter Willie Dixon, who once called Horton“the best harmonica player I ever heard.”

  Horton was born April 6, 1918, in Horn Lake, MS, near Memphis. He began teaching himself to play the harmonica — a gift from his father — at age five, and moved with his mother to Memphis not long after, where he played in Handy Park (near the famed Beale Street) for tips. During his preteen years in the late ’20s, he played — and likely recorded at least a couple of sides — with the Memphis Jug Band (as Shakey Walter); he also learned more about his craft from Will Shade, the Jug Band‘s main harmonica player, and Hammie Nixon, a cohort of Sleepy John Estes. Horton played wherever he could during the Depression — dances, parties, juke joints, street corners — and teamed up with the likes of Robert Johnson, Johnny Shines, Homesick James, and David “Honeyboy” Edwards, among others; he also worked as a sideman in several touring blues bands, including those of Ma Rainey and Big Joe Williams, and spent his first brief period in Chicago. In 1939, he backed guitarist Charlie “Little Buddy” Doyle on some sessions for Columbia. Around the same time (according to Horton himself), he began to experiment with amplifying his harmonica, which if accurate may have made him the first to do so. ”  Continue reading

 

Discography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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