Tag Archive: Blues


A Live Performance Recorded By The BBC In 1974

 

 

 

 

I Wanna Ride , Ride , Ride

Burnt Child 

Hootin’ The Blues

Born With The Blues

Conversation With The River

Feel So Good

Drinkin’ Wine Spo-di-o

Rock Island Line

Walk On

Published on April 1, 2013

 

SONNY TERRY: 

” Tedell Saunders, was a blues singer and harmonica player, born in Greensboro, North Carolina, on October 24, 1911, and died in New York on March 12, 1986.
One eyed by accident at the age of 14 years , and blind as a result of a blow during a fight, several years later, Terry concentrated on the harmonica, partnering with Blind Gary Davis and Blind Boy Fuller, two blind musicians with whom he played in the streets of Durham and Raleigh, accompanied by a red-haired guide, who played the washboard and eventually became known as Bull City Red. Performed some recording for a local label with a sound genuinely to Style Piedmont. Was precisely Red who introduced Brownie McGhee, who He professed great admiration for Fuller. Terry moved to New York when John Hammond signed him to his concerts at Carnegie Hall (1938), sharing experiences with Leadbelly and at Fuller died in 1940, was definitely in town. From this moment, the music careers of Terry and McGhee are joined in the duo “Sonny & Brownie,” one of the most stable and successful bands in the history of the blues, performing a large number of recordings. When, in the 1960s, the rural blues began to lose favor with the black audience, Sonny & Brownie were welcomed by the public folk and European audiences.early 1980s, Terry and McGhee were separated after a period of growing disaffection. Terry continued to record (with Johnny Winter and Willie Dixon), participated in the film “The Color Purple” by Steven Spielberg and starred frequently. Style The style of Terry was personal and original, exuberant and joyful, mimicking the harmonic sound trains, dogs barking, howling screams … combined with his falsetto voice.Very representative of the mountain style, typical of the Appalachians.

 

 

BROWNIE MC GHEE: 

  Walter McGhee was a blues guitarist and singer, born in Knoxville, Tennessee, on November 30, 1915, and died in Oakland, California, on February 16 , 1996. McGhee, paralyzed in his right leg, he learned to play guitar from his father, who taught him the typical fingerpicking style characteristic of the Appalachians. He left his home with only ten years and devoted himself to playing in minstrel shows and medecine shows.During the 1930s, McGhee own formed a band with two guitars, harmonica and washboard. In one of his performances, Bull City Red introduced them to Blind Boy Fuller and Sonny Terry. McGhee always showed special admiration for Fuller, to the point that after his death, made ​​some recordings under the name of Blind Boy Fuller II, in a clear style Piedmont.1 When Fuller died in 1940, McGhee went to New York, with Sonny Terry. From this moment, the music careers of Terry and McGhee are joined in the duo “Sonny & Brownie,” one of the most stable and successful bands in the history of the blues, performing a large number of recordings. When, in the 1960s, the rural blues began to lose favor with the black audience, Sonny & Brownie were welcomed by the public folk and European audiences. early 1980s, Terry and McGhee were separated after a period of growing disaffection. McGhee moved to Los Angeles where he continued to play sporadically until his death. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About these ads

“Someday After A While” “Have You Ever Loved A Woman” “Tore Down”

American Folk Blues Festival 1963

 

 

 

    Featuring Willie Dixon , Lonnie Johnson , Matt “Guitar” Murphy , Memphis Slim , Otis Spann , Victoria Spivey , Bill Stepney , Muddy Waters , Sunny Boy Williamson and Big Joe Williams .

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Live Performance From 1970

 

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Dec 31, 2011

” Howlin Wolf does Highway 49 live in 1970 “

 

 

 

 

 

Live At The Woodlands 1993

 

 

Uploaded on Jun 24, 2007

” This is one of my personal favs, featuring one of the great blues voices. Awesome guitar solos in this version as well! “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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From The Ballyshannon Boy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on May 2, 2006

” Played in France in 1980. It’s the same concert as “off the handle” is played”

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday To The King Of The Blues

 

 

Introduction

” Riley B. King (born September 16, 1925), known by the stage name B.B. King, is an American blues musician, singer, songwriter, and guitarist.

  Rolling Stone magazine ranked him at No. 6 on its 2011 list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time (previously ranked No. 3 in the 2003 edition of the same list), and he was ranked No. 17 in Gibson’s “Top 50 Guitarists of All Time”.According to Edward M. Komara, King “introduced a sophisticated style of soloing based on fluid string bending and shimmering vibrato that would influence virtually every electric blues guitarist that followed.”King was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987. He is considered one of the most influential blues musicians of all time, earning the nickname “The King of Blues”, and one of the “Three Kings of the Blues Guitar” (along with Albert King and Freddie King). King is also known for performing tirelessly throughout his musical career, appearing at 250-300 concerts per year until his seventies. In 1956 it was noted that he appeared at 342 shows. King continues to appear at 100 shows a year.

  Over the years, King has developed one of the world’s most identifiable guitar styles. He borrowed from Blind Lemon Jefferson, T-Bone Walker and others, integrating his precise and complex vocal-like string bends and his left hand vibrato, both of which have become indispensable components of rock guitarists’ vocabulary. His economy and phrasing has been a model for thousands of players. King has mixed blues, jazz, swing, mainstream pop and jump into a unique sound. In King’s words, “When I sing, I play in my mind; the minute I stop singing orally, I start to sing by playing Lucille.”

 

 

 

Early Career

” A singer and guitarist born into a sharecropping family on September 16, 1925, in Itta Bena, Mississippi, B.B. King—born Riley B. King—became one of the best-known blues performers, an important consolidator of blues styles, and a primary model for rock guitarists. Following his service in the U.S. Army, he began his career as a disc jockey in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was dubbed “the Beale Street Blues Boy.” That nickname was soon shortened to “B.B.”

  King made his first recording in 1949, and the next year began a 12-year-long association with Kent/RPM/Modern, for which he recorded a string of rhythm and blues hits, including “You Know I Love You,” “Woke Up This Morning” and “Three O’Clock Blues,” his first national hit. He also toured the nightclub circuit continuously, averaging more than 300 shows annually for over 30 years. His style of music earned him the title “King of the Blues.”

  Coincidentally, the year that King made his first recording was also the same year that he named his beloved guitar. King attended a dance in Twist, Arkansas, that had a barrel lit with kerosene in the middle of the dance floor, used to keep the crowd warm late at night. While there, a fight broke out and the barrel was knocked over, causing a fire to spread throughout the venue. Everyone evacuated, including King, but he rushed back inside to retrieve his prized guitar. Luckily, he managed to escape with his guitar as the building collapsed around him. King later learned that the fight erupted because of a woman who worked at the venue named Lucille. From then on, King named his guitar “Lucille” to remind himself never to do anything so foolish again.”

 

 

 

Beale Street Blues Boy

” After serving briefly in the army, King moved in with his cousin Booker (Bukka) White, also a blues guitarist. King’s attempts to copy Bukka’s playing helped him develop his own style. He sought out Sonny Boy Williamson, who had a radio show on WDIA in West Memphis, and asked to play a song for him. Williamson was so impressed with King that he offered King his own radio show and a chance to play regularly at Miss Annie’s 16th Street Grill. King was able to advertise his upcoming concerts on the radio, and soon he and his trio had become popular. Known on the radio as the “Beale Street Blues Boy,” which was shortened to “Bee-Bee,” and then to his famous initials, King decided he wanted to make records.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” King was signed to Bullet Records and in 1949 recorded four songs at the radio station, including “Miss Martha King” and “I’ve Got the Blues.” He also continued to perform in the area. Musician and talent scout Ike Turner (1931–) connected King with the Kent/Modern/RPM record label, and King’s King’s 1951 single for his new label, “Three O’Clock Blues,” became a hit. He scored several other hits during these years, and by the mid-1950s he was playing about three hundred shows a year. He would maintain this schedule for over twenty years.”

 

 

 

  

The Fifties & Sixties

” The 1950s saw King establish himself as a perennially formidable hitmaking force in the R&B field. Recording mostly in L.A. (the WDIA air shift became impossible to maintain by 1953 due to King‘s endless touring) for RPM and its successor Kent, King scored 20 chart items during that musically tumultuous decade, including such memorable efforts as “You Know I Love You” (1952); “Woke Up This Morning” and “Please Love Me” (1953); “When My Heart Beats like a Hammer,” “Whole Lotta’ Love,” and “You Upset Me Baby” (1954); “Every Day I Have the Blues” (another Fulson remake), the dreamy blues ballad “Sneakin’ Around,” and “Ten Long Years” (1955); “Bad Luck,” “Sweet Little Angel,” and a Platters-like “On My Word of Honor” (1956); and “Please Accept My Love” (first cut by Jimmy Wilson) in 1958. King‘s guitar attack grew more aggressive and pointed as the decade progressed, influencing a legion of up-and-coming axemen across the nation.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” In 1960, King‘s impassioned two-sided revival of Joe Turners “Sweet Sixteen” became another mammoth seller, and his “Got a Right to Love My Baby” and “Partin’ Time” weren’t far behind. But Kent couldn’t hang onto a star like King forever (and he may have been tired of watching his new LPs consigned directly into the 99-cent bins on the Biharis‘ cheapo Crown logo). King moved over to ABC-Paramount Records in 1962, following the lead of Lloyd Price, Ray Charles, and before long, Fats Domino.

  In November of 1964, the guitarist cut his seminal Live at the Regal album at the fabled Chicago theater and excitement virtually leaped out of the grooves. That same year, he enjoyed a minor hit with “How Blue Can You Get,” one of his many signature tunes. “Don’t Answer the Door” in 1966 and “Paying the Cost to Be the Boss” two years later were Top Ten R&B entries, and the socially charged and funk-tinged “Why I Sing the Blues” just missed achieving the same status in 1969. “

 

 

 

 

The Later Years

” Although B.B. King was a huge star in the African-American music community by 1965 he was still mostly unknown in the White community. This would change in 1965 when Elektra Records released Paul Butterfield’s first Butterfield Blues Band album, featuring the late Mike Bloomfield on guitar. Bloomfield became a star, almost overnight, and when he was asked where he learned to play the way he did, he replied, “By copying B.B.’s licks.” No one knew who “B.B.” was. And when they asked, “B.B.” who? Bloomfield replied, “The real monster; B.B. King.” After this happened B.B. King’s popularity soared. In short order “The Thrill Is Gone” became a big hit, he stopped having to play the “chitlin circuit” small town black clubs and started playing larger jazz clubs, dining rooms of luxury resort hotels, college concerts and rock palaces such as Filmore East .”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” In 1969 B.B. made his first appearance on network television on Johnny Carson’s the “Tonight Show.” In 1971 B.B. sang and played on Ed Sullivan’s show. By this time Sidney A. Seidenberg had come on board as B.B.’s new manager, he helped re-negotiate his old recording contracts with ABC/MCA records and got him major new bookings.

  Since the 1970’s B.B. King’s career has moved at a rapid pace up hill. He has recorded over 75 records, has received seven Grammy Awards, including its Lifetime Achievement Award in 1987, has been inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame, 1984, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, 1987, become a Member of the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame, 1990, received the Presidential Medal of the Arts, 1990, the Orville H. Gibson Lifetime Achievement Award, 1991, the Kennedy Center Honors, 1995, Presidential Medal of Freedom, American Heritage Fellowship Award by the National Endowment of the Arts, Three NAACP Image Awards, an MTV Video Music Award, 1989/89, a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and many, many more.

  He has won 22 Downbeat Music Magazine Readers and Critics Poll Awards, 5 Guitar Player Magazine Awards, he has received an Honorary Doctorate of Music from Yale University and fathered 15 children. He has toured with U2 as the super rock group’s opening act and had a song, “When Love Comes to Town, written for him by U2’s star, lead singer, Bono. B.B. King still works between 250 and 300 days a year, calling himself a “music workaholic.” He lives ( when he takes time to rest ) in Las Vegas, Nevada. and currently plays a Gibson ES-355, a guitar he has been playing for over 25 years. He has played all over the world including Africa, Europe, China, Japan, Australia and New Zealand and is properly referred to everywhere as “The Ambassador of the Blues,” a title he so richly deserves.”

 

 

 

” B.B. King has influenced the guitar playing of; Eric Clapton, the late Mike Bloomfield, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Albert Collins, Albert King and Jimi Hendrix. He is one of this country’s living, national treasures, a humble but proud, spiritual and beautiful human being, and still “King of the Blues.” “

 

 

 

 

Discography

Year Album Label AllMusic Rating User Ratings
Singin’ the Blues
1956 Singin’ the Blues album review Pure Pleasure Records
(15)
The Blues
1960 The Blues album review Ace
(42)
Sings Spirituals
1960 Sings Spirituals album review Diablo (UK)
(7)
B.B. King Wails
1960 B.B. King Wails album review
(17)
My Kind of Blues
1961 My Kind of Blues album review EMI-Capitol Special Markets
(7)
More
1961 More album review P-Vine Records
(0)
Easy Listening Blues
1962 Easy Listening Blues album review Pony Canyon Records
(5)
Twist with B.B. King 1962 Twist with B.B. King
(0)
Blues in My Heart
1962 Blues in My Heart album review Ace
(2)
Blues for Me 1962 Blues for Me
(2)
A Heart Full of Blues
1962 A Heart Full of Blues P-Vine Records
(2)
Swing Low 1963 Swing Low United Recordings
(0)
Mr. Blues [ABC]
1963 Mr. Blues [ABC] album review ABC Music
(5)
Rock Me Baby [Kent] 1964 Rock Me Baby [Kent]
(1)
Let Me Love You 1965 Let Me Love You album review P-Vine Records
(0)
Boss of the Blues
1965 Boss of the Blues P-Vine Records
(2)
Live at the Regal
1965 Live at the Regal album review MCA
(236)
Live! B. B. King on Stage 1965 Live! B. B. King on Stage
(0)
Confessin' the Blues 1965 Confessin’ the Blues album review ABC Music
(5)
Turn on to B.B. King 1966 Turn on to B.B. King album review
(0)
The Original Sweet Sixteen 1966 The Original Sweet Sixteen album review
(1)
9 X 9.5 1966 9 X 9.5 United Recordings
(0)
R&B Soul 1967 R&B Soul Ember
(0)
Blues Is King [MCA]
1967 Blues Is King [MCA] album review MCA / Universal Special Products
(13)
Lucille
1968 Lucille album review MCA
(16)
Blues on Top of Blues
1968 Blues on Top of Blues album review Beat Goes On
(13)
Live & Well
1969 Live & Well album review Beat Goes On
(16)
The Feeling They Call the Blues, Vol. 2 1969 The Feeling They Call the Blues, Vol. 2 Trio
(0)
The Feeling They Call the Blues 1969 The Feeling They Call the Blues Trio
(0)
Completely Well
1969 Completely Well album review MCA
(41)
The Incredible Soul of B.B. King 1970 The Incredible Soul of B.B. King album review
(0)
Indianola Mississippi Seeds
1970 Indianola Mississippi Seeds album review MCA
(40)
Live in Cook County Jail
1971 Live in Cook County Jailalbum review MCA
(101)
Live in Japan
1971 Live in Japan album review MCA
(17)
In London
1971 In London album review Beat Goes On
(18)
L.A. Midnight 1972 L.A. Midnight album review
(6)
Guess Who
1972 Guess Who album review MCA
(9)
To Know You Is to Love You
1973 To Know You Is to Love You album review MCA
(10)
Friends
1974 Friends Beat Goes On
(2)
Together for the First Time...Live
1974 Together for the First Time…Live album review MCA
(15)
Together for the First Time 1974 Together for the First Time album review Dunhill Compact Classics
(1)
Together Again...Live
1976 Together Again…Live album review MCA
(6)
King Size 1977 King Size album review ABC Music
(2)
Midnight Believer
1978 Midnight Believer album review MCA
(7)
Take It Home
1979 Take It Home album review MCA
(8)
Rarest B.B. King 1980 Rarest B.B. King Blues Boy
(1)
Live
1980 Live “Now Appearing” at Ole Miss album review MCA
(3)
There Must Be a Better World Somewhere
1981 There Must Be a Better World Somewhere album review Beat Goes On
(7)
Love Me Tender
1982 Love Me Tender album review MCA
(4)
Blues 'n' Jazz
1983 Blues ‘n’ Jazz album review MCA
(6)
Six Silver Strings
1985 Six Silver Strings album review MCA
(8)
One Nighter Blues 1987 One Nighter Blues Ace
(1)
Introducing B.B. King 1987 Introducing B.B. King MCA
(0)
Doing My Thing, Lord 1988 Doing My Thing, Lord Kent
(0)
Across the Tracks 1988 Across the Tracks Ace
(0)
Lucille Had a Baby 1989 Lucille Had a Baby Ace
(0)
Live at the Apollo
1990 Live at the Apollo album review GRP
(10)
I Like to Live the Love
1990 I Like to Live the Love album review MCA Special Products
(0)
Live at San Quentin
1991 Live at San Quentin album review MCA
(8)
There Is Always One More Time
1992 There Is Always One More Time album review MCA
(7)
Better Than Ever 1993 Better Than Ever Kent
(0)
Blues Summit
1993 Blues Summit album review MCA
(18)
B.B. King/Mayfield/Flack 1994 B.B. King/Mayfield/Flack Castle Music Ltd.
(0)
Live in Kansas City
1994 Live in Kansas City Charly Records
(7)
True Blue
1994 True Blue Sequel
(2)
Swing Low Sweet Chariot
1995 Swing Low Sweet Chariot Prime Cuts
(2)
On the Road with B.B King 1996 On the Road with B.B King MCA
(0)
The Masters of the Blues [Delta]
1997 The Masters of the Blues [Delta] album review Delta Distribution
(0)
Paying the Cost to Be the Boss
1997 Paying the Cost to Be the Boss album review Laserlight
(1)
Deuces Wild
1997 Deuces Wild album review MCA
(34)
King Biscuit Flower Hour Presents B.B. King
1998 King Biscuit Flower Hour Presents B.B. King album review King Biscuit Entertainment
(2)
Blues on the Bayou
1998 Blues on the Bayou album review MCA
(36)
Let the Good Times Roll: The Music of Louis Jordan
1999 Let the Good Times Roll: The Music of Louis Jordan album review MCA
(22)
Makin' Love Is Good for You
2000 Makin’ Love Is Good for You album review MCA
(10)
Riding with the King
2000 Riding with the King album review Reprise
(213)
A Night in Cannes
2001 A Night in Cannes Purple Pyramid/Cleopatra / Cleopatra
(2)
A Christmas Celebration of Hope
2001 A Christmas Celebration of Hope album review MCA
(5)
Reflections
2003 Reflections album review MCA
(6)
80
2005 80 album review Geffen
(20)
Live
2008 Live album review Geffen
(45)
One Kind Favor
2008 One Kind Favor album review Geffen
(202)
Live at the Royal Albert Hall 2011
2012 Live at the Royal Albert Hall 2011 album review Shout! Factory
(134)

Concert Films 

BB King Africa 1974

B.B. King – Live in Dallas (1983)

B.B. King & Friends – A Blues Session [live in L.A. 1987]

B.B.King Live in Bonn 1994

A Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan with Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy and BB King – 1996

B B King & Band Live at B B King Blues Clubs Nashville & Menphis 2006

 

 

 

Interviews

B.B. King 1968 Interview

A talk with B.B. King

BB King – Blues Master

B.B. King: First Gig

Interview with B.B. King – North Sea jazz 2000

B.B. King interview 1989 – U2 “discover” B.B. King!

BB King – Johnny Winter – Blues, Interviews & Jam

B.B. King: The Life of Riley Official Trailer 1 (2014) – Documentary HD

B B King – The Life of Riley – Interview

 

 

 

Happy Birthday To The King Of The Blues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rollin’ & Tumblin’

 

 

 

 

I’m Lost Without You – Memphis Slim

 

 

 

Uploaded on Mar 12, 2010

” One of my favorites from Memphis Slim. In European Jazz prisma 1963. Matt Guitar Murphy on guitar.

http://www.thefortynighters.com

 

 

 

Blues Legend Johnny Winter Dies At Age 70 In Zurich

 

 

 

 

 

” Texas blues legend Johnny Winter, known for his collaborations with the likes of Jimi Hendrix and childhood hero Muddy Waters, has died at the age of 70.

  His representative, Carla Parisi, confirmed today that Winter died in a hotel room in Zurich, Switzerland, on Wednesday. There was no immediate word on the cause of death.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Winter was a leading light among the white blues guitar players, including Eric Clapton and the late Stevie Ray Vaughan, who followed in the footsteps of the earlier Chicago blues masters. 

Winter idolized Waters — and got a chance to produce some of the blues legend’s more popular albums.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Rolling Stone magazine named Winter one of the top 100 guitarists of all time and he was famed for his lightening-fast blues guitar riffs and striking long white hair.

  His representative’s statement said his wife, family and bandmates were all saddened by the loss of one of the world’s finest guitarists.”

 

 

 

    Johnny may have departed this earth but thanks to his music we are “still alive & well” … RIP Mr Winter your absence will be forever felt .

 

 

 

   Read more about the legend’s death here and look for an in-depth tribute to one of our favorite guitarists very soon…

Daily Video 7.15.14

Canned Heat – On The Road Again (feat. Alan Wilson)

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Dec 4, 2007

” Rare video of Canned Heat playing live their song “On The Road Again”. This was in early 1970 of their European tour. The blind owl plays a wonderful harp part.”

 

 

 

Daily Video 7.7.14

Hound Dog Taylor & Little Walter – Wild About You Baby

 

 

 

Uploaded on Nov 18, 2007

” Hound Dog Taylor & the Houserockers featuring Little Walter on harmonica. This was back in 1967. 

My account was deleted a while ago so I re-uploaded this one again. I thought it was kind a shame this one was deleted of youtube because we had some very nice discussions going, with even people like Billy Branch commenting! “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Jeff Beck

Happy Birthday To A Master

 

 

JEFF BECK

” Beck grew up in Wallington, England. His mother’s piano playing and the family’s radio tuned to everything from dance to classical made sure Beck was surrounded by music from a young age.

“ For my parents, who lived through the war, music was a source of comfort to them. Life was tense and music helped them forget about their troubles. I’m sure that made an impression on me,” recalls Beck. “I was really small when jazz broke through in England and I can still remember sneaking off to the living room to listen to it on the radio—much to my parent’s disapproval.”

  Inspired by the music he heard, it wasn’t long before Beck picked up a guitar and began playing around London. He briefly attended Wimbledon’s Art College before leaving to devote all of his time to music. Beck worked as a session player, with Screaming Lord Sutch – the British equivalent to Screaming Jay Hawkins – and the Tridents before he replaced Eric Clapton as the Yardbirds’ lead guitarist in 1965.”

  

 

 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_o3CIa3nrZE&feature=player_detailpage

 

 

 

 

 

 ” Geoffrey Arnold “Jeff” Beck (born 24 June 1944) is an English rock guitarist. He is one of three noted guitarists to have played with The Yardbirds(Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page are the other two). Beck also formed The Jeff Beck Group and Beck, Bogert & Appice.

  Much of Beck’s recorded output has been instrumental, with a focus on innovative sound and his releases have spanned genres ranging from blues-rockheavy metaljazz fusion and an additional blend of guitar-rock and electronica. Although he recorded two hit albums (in 1975 and 1976) as a solo act, Beck has not established or maintained the sustained commercial success of many of his contemporaries and bandmates.

   Beck appears on albums by Mick JaggerKate BushRoger WatersDonovanStevie WonderLes PaulZuccheroCyndi LauperBrian May and ZZ Top. In 1988, he made a cameo appearance in the movie Twins.

  He was ranked 5th in Rolling Stone‘s list of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time” and the magazine has described him as “one of the most influential lead guitarists in rock”.  MSNBC has called him a “guitarist’s guitarist”.  Beck has earned wide critical praise and received the Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance six times and Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance once. He has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice: as a member of The Yardbirds (1992) and as a solo artist (2009).  “

 

 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXIwEhS2Tkc&feature=player_detailpage

 

 

 

 

 

 All About Jazz is celebrating Jeff Beck’s birthday today!

 

” Jeff Beck isn’t your typical guitar legend. His goal, in fact, is to make you forget that he plays guitar. “I don\’t understand why some people will only accept a guitar if it has an instantly recognizable guitar sound,” says Beck.”Finding ways to use the same guitar people have been using for 50 years to make sounds that no one has heard before is truly what gets me off… Read more. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” This Jeff Beck recordings listing is arranged in chronological order, except for the recordings he made with the Yardbirds. Jeff Beck was a member of the Yardbirds for two years and some of the recordings he made with them were not released until 14 years later. All records listed are US and England, unless otherwise specified.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Jeff , Long May You Play

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where Did You Sleep Last Night by LEADBELLY (1944) Blues Guitar Legend

 

 

 

Uploaded on Apr 13, 2009

” ” Where Did You Sleep Last Night ” (1944)
LEADBELLY

The ” RED HOT BLUES ” (1925-1945)
Texas Alexander
Pink Anderson
Kokomo Arnold
Barbecue Bob
Scrapper Blackwell
Black Ace
Ed Bell
Blind Blake
Ishman Bracey
Big Bill Broonzy
Richard “Rabbit” Brown
Willie Brown
Bumble Bee Slim
Gus Cannon
Bo Carter
Sam Collins
Floyd Council
Gary Davis
Sleepy John Estes
Blind Boy Fuller
Son House
Peg Leg Howell
Mississippi John Hurt
Papa Charlie Jackson
Jim Jackson
Skip James
Blind Lemon Jefferson
Blind Willie Johnson
Lonnie Johnson
Robert Johnson
Tommy Johnson
Charley Jordan
Luke Jordan
Leadbelly
Furry Lewis
Cripple Clarence Lofton
Tommy McClennan
Robert Lee McCoy
Blind Willie McTell
The Memphis Jug Band
Buddy Moss
Memphis Minnie
Hambone Willie Newbern
Charley Patton
Robert Petway
Jimmie Rodgers
Frank Stokes
Sonny Terry
Henry Thomas
Ramblin Thomas
Curley Weaver
Casey Bill Weldon
Peetie Wheatstraw
Bukka White
Josh White
Robert Wilkins
Big Joe Williams “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memphis Minnie – Hoodoo Lady Blues

 

 

 

Wikipedia

” Lizzie Douglas (June 3, 1897 – August 6, 1973), known as Memphis Minnie, was a blues guitarist, vocalist, and songwriter whose recording career lasted from the 1920s to the 1950s. She recorded around 200 songs, some of the best known being “Bumble Bee”, “Nothing in Rambling”, and “Me and My Chauffeur Blues“. Her performances and songwriting made her well known in a genre dominated mostly by men. She died on August 6, 1973, in Memphis, Tennessee.

 

 

Early life

Lizzie Douglas was born on June 3, 1897 in Algiers, Louisiana. She was the eldest of 13 siblings. Her parents Abe and Gertrude Douglas nicknamed her “Kid” during her early childhood. Her family called her “Kid” throughout her childhood because she never liked the name “Lizzie”, and when she first began performing she played under the name Kid Douglas.

When she was 7 she and her family moved to Walls, Mississippi, a town a little to the South of Memphis. The following year she received her first guitar for Christmas, and learned to play banjo by the age of 10 and guitar by the age of 11, when she started playing local parties. The family later moved to Brunswick, Tennessee, but after Minnie’s mother died in 1922 her father moved back to Walls, where he died thirteen years later in 1935.

Career

In 1910, at the age of 13, she ran away from her home to live on Beale Street in Memphis, Tennessee. She played on street corners for most of her teenage years, although she would periodically return to her family’s farm when she ran out of money. Her sidewalk performances led to a four-year tour of the South with the Ringling Brothers Circus from 1916 to 1920. Eventually she came back to Beale Street and got involved in the blues scene. At the time, women, whiskey, and cocaine were high in demand with the people and places she would be around. She made her money by playing guitar, singing, and prostitution, which was not uncommon at the time, since many female performers also worked as prostitutes because of financial desperation.

In 1929 she and Kansas Joe McCoy, her second husband, began to perform together. They were discovered by a talent scout of Columbia Records in front of a barber shop where they were playing for dimes. When she and McCoy went to record in New York, they were given the names Kansas Joe and Memphis Minnie by a Columbia A and R man. During the next few years she and McCoy released a series of records, performing as a duet. In February 1930 they recorded the song “Bumble Bee”, which they had already recorded for Columbia but which had not yet been released, for the Vocalion label. This became one of Minnie’s most popular songs, and she eventually recorded five versions of it. Minnie and McCoy continued to record for Vocalion until August 1934, when they recorded a few sessions for Decca, with their last session together being for Decca in September. They divorced in 1935. She and McCoy introduced country blues to the urban environment and became very well known.

A famous anecdote from Big Bill Broonzy‘s autobiography Big Bill Blues recounts a cutting contest between Minnie and Broonzy. It took place in a Chicago Nightclub on June 26, 1933, for the prize of a bottle of whiskey and a bottle of gin. Each singer was to sing two songs, and after Broonzy sang “Just a Dream” and “Make My Getaway”, Minnie won the prize with “Me and my Chauffeur Blues” and “Looking the World Over”. Paul and Beth Garon, in their book Woman with Guitar: Memphis Minnie’s Blues, suggest that Broonzy’s account may have combined various contests at different dates, as these songs of Minnie’s date from the 1940s rather than the 1930s.

By 1935 Minnie was established in Chicago, and had became one of the group of musicians who worked regularly for record producer and talent scout Lester Melrose. Back on her own after a divorce from Kansas Joe, Minnie began to experiment with different styles and sounds. She recorded four sides for the Bluebird label in July 1935, then in August of that year she returned to the Vocation label, and then in October of the same year recorded another session for Bluebird, this time accompanied by Casey Bill Weldon. By the end of the 1930s, in addition to her output for Vocalion, Minnie had recorded nearly 20 sides for Decca Records and eight sides for Bluebird Records. During the 1930s Minnie also toured extensively, mainly in the South.

In 1938 Minnie returned to recording for the Vocation label, this time accompanied by Charlie McCoy, Kansas Joe’s brother, on mandolin. Around this time she married guitarist and singer Earnest Lawlars (a.k.a. Little Son Joe) and began recording material with him in 1939, with Son’s playing adding a more rhythmic backing to Minnies’s guitar. Minnie and Little Son Joe also began to release material on Okeh Records in the 1940s, and the couple continued to record together throughout the decade. In May 1941 Minnie recorded her biggest hit, “Me And My Chauffeur Blues.” A follow-up date produced two more blues standards, “Looking The World Over” and Joe’s “Black Rat Swing” (issued as by “Mr. Memphis Minnie”). At the dawn of the 1940s Minnie and Joe continued to work at their “home club”, Chicago’s popular 708 club where they were often joined by Big Bill, Sunnyland Slim, or Snooky Pryor. They also played at many of the other better known Chicago nightclubs. During the 1940s Minnie and Son Joe performed both together and on separate gigs in the Chicago and Indiana areas. Minnie often played at “Blue Monday” parties at Ruby Lee Gatewood’s on Lake Street. The poet Langston Hughes, who saw Minnie perform at the 230 club on New Year’s Eve 1942, wrote of her “hard and strong voice” being made harder and stronger by amplification, and described the sound of her electric guitar as “a musical version of electric welders plus a rolling mill”.

Later in the 1940s Minnie lived in Indianapolis, Indiana and Detroit, Michigan, returning to Chicago in the early 1950s. By the late 1940s, clubs began hiring younger and cheaper artists to play shows at their venues and Columbia began dropping Blues artists including Memphis Minnie.

Later life and death

 

                                                                      Memphis Minnie’s grave (2008) 

Minnie continued to record into the 1950s, but her health began to become a problem for her. With public interest in her music declining, she retired from her musical career and in 1957 she and Lawlars returned to Memphis. Periodically, she would appear on Memphis radio stations to encourage young blues musicians. As the Garons wrote in Women With Guitar, ‘She never laid her guitar down, until she could literally no longer pick it up.’ She suffered a stroke in 1960, which caused her to be wheelchair-bound. The following year her husband, Earnest “Little Son Joe” Lawlars died, and Minnie had another stroke a short while after. She could no longer survive on her social security income so magazines wrote about her and readers sent her money for assistance. She spent her last years in the Jell Nursing Home in Memphis where she died of a further stroke in 1973. She is buried at the New Hope Baptist Church Cemetery in WallsDeSoto County, Mississippi. A headstone paid for by Bonnie Raitt was erected by the Mt. Zion Memorial Fund on 13 October 1996 with 35 family members in attendance including her sister, numerous nieces (including Laverne Baker) and nephews. The ceremony was taped for broadcast by the BBC.

Her headstone is marked:

Lizzie “Kid” Douglas Lawlers
aka Memphis Minnie

The inscription on the back of her gravestone reads:

The hundreds of sides Minnie recorded are the perfect material to teach us about the blues. For the blues are at once general, and particular, speaking for millions, but in a highly singular, individual voice. Listening to Minnie’s songs we hear her fantasies, her dreams, her desires, but we will hear them as if they were our own.

Character and personal life

Minnie was known for being a polished professional, and an independent woman who knew how to take care of herself. Although she portrayed herself to the public as being feminine and “lady-like” by wearing expensive dresses and jewelry, she was aggressive when she needed to be and was not shy when it came to fighting. According to bluesman Johnny Shines, “Any men fool with her she’d go for them right away. She didn’t take no foolishness off them. Guitar, pocket knife, pistol, anything she get her hand on she’d use it”. According to Homesick James she chewed tobacco all the time including whenever she sang or played her guitar, and always had a cup at hand in case she wanted to spit. Most of the music she made was autobiographical; Minnie expressed a lot of her personal life through her music.

Minnie was married three times. Although no evidence has been found of any marriage certificates, her first husband is usually said to have been Will Weldon whom she married in the early 1920s. Her second husband was guitarist and mandolin player Joe McCoy (aka Kansas Joe McCoy) whom she married in 1929. They filed for divorce in 1934, with McCoy’s jealousy of Minnie’s rise to fame and success often being said to be the reason. In 1939, she met guitarist Earnest Lawlars (aka Little Son Joe). He became her new musical partner and they married shortly thereafter. Son Joe dedicated songs to her including “Key to The World” in which he addresses her as “the woman I got now” and calls her “the key to the world.” Minnie was also reported to have lived with a man known as “Squirrel” in the mid- to late 1930s.

Minnie was not religious and rarely went to church; the only time she was reported to have gone to church was to see a Gospel group perform. While she was baptised shortly before she died, this was probably done to please her sister Daisy Johnson. The home she once lived in still exists at 1355 Adelaide Street in Memphis, Tennessee.

Legacy

Memphis Minnie has been described as “the most popular female country blues singer of all time”, while Big Bill Broonzy said that she could “pick a guitar and sing as good as any man I’ve ever heard.” Minnie lived to see her reputation revived in the 1960s as part of the general revival of interest in the blues. She was an influence on later singers such as Big Mama Thornton and Jo Ann Kelly, and was inducted into the Blues Foundation‘s Hall of Fame in 1980.

“Me and My Chauffeur Blues” was recorded by Jefferson Airplane on their debut album Jefferson Airplane Takes Off, with Signe Anderson as lead vocalist. “When the Levee Breaks“, a 1929 Memphis Minnie and Kansas Joe McCoy song, was covered (with slightly altered lyrics and a different melody) by Led Zeppelin and released in 1971 on their fourth album.

Songs

Discography

Year Album Genre Label Songs
1982 The Best of Memphis Minnie Vol. 1 1929-1938 Blues Earl ”’Frisco Town”, “Bumble Bee”, “Grandpa and Grandma Blues”, “Garage Fire Blues”, and more
1988 I Ain’t No Bad Gal Blues Portrait “You Need A Friend”, “Can’t Afford To Lose My Man”, “Me and My Chauffeur Blues”, “Looking The World Over”, and more
1997 Me & My Chauffeur 1935–1946with Little Son Joe Blues Epm Musique “Hoodoo Lady”, “Hot Stuff”, “My And My Chauffeur Blues”, “My Baby Don’t Want Me No More”, and more
2000 Pickin’ the Blues with Kansas Joe McCoy Blues Culture Press “Bumble Bee”, “When The Levee Breaks“, “Joe Louis Strut”, “Crazy Cryin’ Blues”, “Picking The Blues”, “Ma Rainey”, and more
2008 Memphis Minnie & Kansas Joe – Early Recordings (1929-1936) Blues Autogram ”Goin’ Back To Texas”, “I’m Talkin About You”, “Bumble Bee”, “I’m Going Back Home”, and more
unknown Gonna Take The Dirt Road Home: Memphis Minnie In The Forties Blues Origin Jazz Library ”Blue Monday Blues”, “Moaning Blues”, “Shout The Boogie”, “Hold Me Blues”, and more
unknown City Blues Blues Aldabra Records ”Dirty Mother For You”, “Keep On Goin’”, “Jockey Man Blues”, “He’s In The Ring”, and more
unknown Travelling Blues Blues Aldabra Records ”Going Back To Texas”, “Frisco Town”, “Bumble Bee”, “She Wouldn’t Give Me None”, and more

Compilations

Year Title Genre Label
1964 Blues Classics By Memphis Minnie blues Blues Classics
c. 1967 Vol. 2 Early Recordings With Kansas Joe McCoy blues Blues Classics
1968 Blind Willie McTell And Memphis Minnie – Love Changin’ Blues blues Biograph Records
1973 1934-1941 blues Flyright Records
1973 1941-1949 blues Flyright Records
1977 1936-1949 Hot Stuff blues Magpie Records
1982 World Of Trouble blues Flyright Records
1983 Moaning The Blues blues MCA Records
1984 In My Girlish Days 1930-1935 blues Travelin’ Man
1987 1930-1941 blues Old Tramp
1988 I Ain’t No Bad Girl blues CBS
1991 Hoodoo Lady 1933-1937 blues Columbia
1994 In My Girlish Days blues Blues Encore
1996 Let’s Go To Town blues Orbis
1997 Queen Of The Blues blues Columbia
1997 The Queen Of The Blues 1929-1941 blues Frémeaux & Associés
2000 Pickin’ The Blues blues Catfish Records
2003 Me And My Chauffeur Blues blues Proper Records Ltd.
2007 Complete Recorded Works In Chronological Order – Volume 1 – 10 January To 31 October 1935 blues Document Records
unknown Ma Rainey / Memphis Minnie – Night Time Blues blues History

 

 

External links

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daily Video 5.16.14

Damon Fowler – “Old Fools, Bar Stools, and Me”

 

 

 

 

Published on May 1, 2014

” The Damon Fowler Band performs a live version of “Old Fools, Bar Stools, and Me,” a track from their highly-acclaimed new release, Sounds of Home.”

Muddy Waters & Rory Gallagher [ 1 ] ~ Tribute ( Electric Chicago Blues 1972)

 

 

 

 

Published on Apr 21, 2014

” From the album ”The London Muddy Waters Sessions” 1972
Track List
”Who’s Gonna Be Your Sweet Man When I’m Gone”
”Key To The Highway”
”I’m Gonna Move To The Outskirts Of Town”
*Disclaimer: All audio & visual parts in my videos are the sole property of their respective owners.
The videos are purely for entertainment and recreational purposes.
No Copyright infringement intended!
All rights go to their rightful owners.
I do not own the rights of the music. “

Remembering Little Walter feat. Sugar Ray Norcia – “Up The Line”

 

 

 

 

Published on Nov 18, 2013

” Sugar Ray Norcia performing “Up The Line” (with a sterling guitar solo by Little Charlie Baty) in a tribute to Little Walter Jacobs. Sugar Ray is joined in concert that evening by fellow harpists Charlie Musselwhite, Mark Hummel, Billy Boy Arnold, and James Harman on the “Remembering Little Walter” CD, released on Blind Pig Records. Available on iTunes at:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/rem… “

Greatness

 

 

A Fabulous Early Performance

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Little Walter

 

 

little-walter

 

 

 

Wiki Bio

 

” Jacobs was born in Marksville, Louisiana and raised in Rapides Parish, Louisiana, where he first learned to play the harmonica. After quitting school by the age of 12, Jacobs left rural Louisiana and travelled around working odd jobs and busking on the streets of New Orleans, Memphis, Helena, Arkansas and St. Louis. He honed his musical skills on harmonica and guitar performing with much older bluesmen such as Sonny Boy Williamson IISunnyland SlimHoneyboy Edwards and others.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Arriving in Chicago in 1945, he occasionally found work as a guitarist but garnered more attention for his already highly developed harmonica work. According to fellow Chicago bluesman Floyd Jones, Little Walter’s first recording was an unreleased demo recorded soon after he arrived in Chicago on which Walter played guitar backing Jones. Jacobs reportedly grew frustrated with having his harmonica drowned out by electric guitarists, and adopted a simple, but previously little-used method: He cupped a small microphone in his hands along with his harmonica, and plugged the microphone into a public address system or guitar amplifier. He could thus compete with any guitarist’s volume. However, unlike other contemporary blues harp players such as Sonny Boy Williamson I and Snooky Pryor, who like many other harmonica players had also begun using the newly available amplifier technology around the same time solely for added volume, Little Walter purposely pushed his amplifiers beyond their intended technical limitations, using the amplification to explore and develop radical new timbres and sonic effects previously unheard from a harmonica, or any other instrument.  Madison Deniro wrote a small biographical piece on Little Walter stating that “He was the first musician of any kind to purposely use electronic distortion.” 

 

 

 

 

 

Rock  Hall Of Fame

 

”  Little Walter made his way north to Chicago via stops in New Orleans and Monroe, Louisiana; St. Helena, Arkansas; Memphis, Tennessee; and St. Louis, Missouri, arriving in the Windy City in 1947. That same year, he made his first recordings for the local Ora Nelle label. Little Walter and Muddy Waters first appeared on a session together when both backed Jimmy Rogers in 1949. Waters backed Little Walter on a session for Parkway Records in January 1950. That August, Little Walter first backed Muddy for the Chess label, and in October, they recorded the Waters classic “Louisiana Blues.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Nearly a year after Little Walter’s initial appearance on a Muddy Waters session for Chess, he used an amplified harmonica for the first time on a groundbreaking July 1951 session that yielded “She Moves Me.” Waters was among the earliest to recognize that blues possessed a formidable power when electrified, and with Jimmy Rogers on electric guitar and Little Walter on amplified harp, he had the hottest blues band in Chicago. Little Walter split from Waters’ band after an instrumental showcase of his that was popular with crowds – “Your Cat Will Play,” retitled “Juke” when he recorded it – became a huge solo hit. A classic juke-joint instrumental, “Juke” topped the R&B chart for eight weeks in the fall of 1952.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” In addition to harmonica, Little Walter played guitar, sang and wrote songs. He recruited a backing band from the Chicago club scene (whom he rechristened the Jukes, after his big song), and they recorded and toured throughout the Fifties. On his own, Little Walter charted 14 Top Ten R&B hits for the Chess label’s Checker subsidiary. One of these, “My Babe” – written by Willie Dixon and featuring the melody from the spiritual “This Train” – went to Number One. Other sizable hits from Little Walter included “Sad Hours,” “Mean Old World,” “Blues With a Feeling,” “You’re So Fine,” “Oh, Baby” and ‘Last Night.” At Leonard Chess’s behest, Little Walter continued recording with Muddy Waters, too, adding his unmistakable harmonica to such classics as “I’m Your Hoochie Coochie Man” and “Trouble No More.” “

 

 

 

 

Allmusic Bio

 

” By 1950, Walter was firmly entrenched as Waters‘ studio harpist at Chess as well (long after Walter had split the Muddy Waters band, Leonard Chess insisted on his participation on waxings — why split up an unbeatable combination?). That’s how Walter came to record his breakthrough 1952 R&B chart-topper “Juke” — the romping instrumental was laid down at the tail-end of a Waters session. Suddenly, Walterwas a star on his own, combining his stunning talents with those of the Aces (guitarists Louis and David Myers and drummer Fred Below) and advancing the concept of blues harmonica another few light years with every session he made for Checker Records.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” From 1952 to 1958, Walter notched 14 Top Ten R&B hits, including “Sad Hours,” “Mean Old World,” “Tell Me Mama,” “Off the Wall,” “Blues with a Feeling,” “You’re So Fine,” a threatening “You Better Watch Yourself,” the mournful “Last Night,” and a rocking “My Babe” that was Willie Dixon‘s secularized treatment of the traditional gospel lament “This Train.” Throughout his Checker tenure,Walter alternated spine-chilling instrumentals with gritty vocals (he’s always been underrated in that department; he wasn’t Muddy Waters or the Wolf, but who was?).”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Walter utilized the chromatic harp in ways never before envisioned (check out his 1956 free-form instrumental “Teenage Beat,” with Robert Jr. Lockwood and Luther Tucker manning the guitars, for proof positive). 1959’s determined “Everything Gonna Be Alright” was Walter‘s last trip to the hit lists; Chicago blues had faded to a commercial non-entity by then unless your name was Jimmy Reed.

Tragically, the ’60s saw the harp genius slide steadily into an alcohol-hastened state of unreliability, his once-handsome face becoming a road map of scars. In 1964, he toured Great Britain with the Rolling Stones, who clearly had their priorities in order, but his once-prodigious skills were faltering badly. That sad fact was never more obvious than on 1967’s disastrous summit meeting of WatersBo Diddley, and  Walter for Chess as the Super Blues Band; there was nothing super whatsoever about Walter‘s lame remakes of “My Babe” and “You Don’t Love Me.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Walter‘s eternally vicious temper led to his violent undoing in 1968. He was involved in a street fight (apparently on the losing end, judging from the outcome) and died from the incident’s after-effects at age 37. His influence remains inescapable to this day — it’s unlikely that a blues harpist exists on the face of this earth who doesn’t worship Little Walter.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Musicianguide Bio

 

 

” Though Little Walter’s studio performances of the late 1950s continued to produce first-rate material, his rough lifestyle began to take its toll. By the 1960s he bore facial scars from drunken altercations. As Muddy Waters told Paul Oliver during the 1960s in Conversation With the Blues, “He’s real tough, Little Walter, and he’s had it hard. Got a slug in his leg right now!” Walter’s street-hardened behavior resulted in his death, at his home, on February 15, 1968, from a blood clot sustained during a street fight. He was 37.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Upon his death, Little Walter left a recording career unparalleled in the history of postwar Chicago Blues. His musicianship has influenced nearly every modern blues harmonica player. In the liner notes to Confessin’ the Blues, Pete Welding wrote: “Honor Little Walter, who gave us so much and, who like most bluesmen, received so little.” But as a man who lived through his instrument, Walter knew no other source of reward than the mastery of his art and the freedom to create music of original expression.”

 

 

 

 

 

Discography

 

Albums

Little Waler

‎ (LP)

Marble Arch Records 1964

Bo DiddleyLittle WalterMuddy Waters – Super Blues ‎ ◄ (13 versions)

Checker 1967

The Best Of Little Walter Vol. 2

‎ (2xVinyl)

Chess 1985

Little Walter & Otis Rush – Live In Chicago ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Cleo Records 1986

Hate To See You Go

‎ (CD, Album)

Chess 1990

Singles & EPs

It’s Too Late Brother / Take Me Back

‎ (7″)

Checker 1956

Teenage Beat / Just A Feeling

‎ (7″)

Checker 1956

Everything Gonna Be Alright / Back Track

‎ (7″)

Checker 1959

My Babe

‎ (7″)

Checker 1960

Ah’w Baby / I Had My Fun

‎ (7″, Single, Promo)

Checker 1960

Crazy For My Baby / Crazy Legs

‎ (7″)

Checker 1961

I Don’t Play / As Long As I Have You

‎ (7″)

Checker 1961

Up The Line

‎ (7″)

Checker 1963

My Babe / Thunderball

‎ (7″)

Checker 2013

Crazy Mixed Up World / My Baby Is Sweater

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Checker Unknown

Little Walter / Pigmeat Markham – My Babe / Here Comes The Judge ‎ (7″, RP)

Collectables Unknown

Dale Hawkins / Little Walter – La Do Dada / Juke ‎ (7″, RP)

Collectables Unknown

Compilations

The Best Of Little Walter

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Chess 1957

Chess Masters

‎ (2xLP, Comp)

Chess 1964

Hate To See You Go

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Chess 1969

Quarter To Twelve

‎ (LP, Comp)

Red Lightnin’ 1969

Thunderbird

‎ (LP, Comp)

Syndicate ChapterSyndicate Chapter 1971

Muddy Waters – Little Walter – Howlin’ Wolf – We Three Kings ‎ (LP, Comp)

Syndicate Chapter 1971

Boss Blues Harmonica

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Chess 1972

Chess Blues Master Series

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Chess 1976

Bo DiddleyLittle WalterMuddy WatersHowlin’ Wolf – Super Blues Session ‎ (2xLP, Comp, RE)

Bellaphon 1976

Confessin’ The Blues

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Chess 1977

The Best Of Little Walter

‎ (Cass, Comp, RE, Dol)

ChessMCA Records 1986

The Little Walter Collection – 20 Blues Greats

‎ (LP, Comp)

Deja Vu 1987

The Best Of Little Walter Volume Two

‎ (LP, Comp)

Chess 1989

My Babe 20 Blues Classics

‎ (CD, Comp)

Blue City (2) 1989

The Electric Harmonica Genius

‎ (LP, Comp)

Blues Encore 1990

Blues With A Feeling

‎ (LP, Comp)

Roots (6) 1990

Blues With A Feeling

‎ (CD, Comp)

Blues Encore 1990

The World Of Little Walter / Juke

‎ (CD, Comp)

Trace (2) 1992

Boss Blues Harmonica

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Orbis 1995

Boss Blues Harmonica

‎ (CD, Comp)

DeAgostini (Netherlands) B.V. 1995

Blues With A Feelin’

‎ (2xCD, Comp, RM)

Chess 1997

His Best

‎ (CD, RM, Comp)

Chess 1997

Blowing With A Feeling

‎ (CD, Comp, RM)

Saga 2005

Little Walter

‎ (CD, Comp)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LINKS

Little Walter Latest Albums | MTV

Essential | Little Walter Album | Yahoo! Music

Chess Blues Masters Series by Little Walter | MTV

Little Walter | Artistopia Music

 

 

VIDEOS

Little Walter’s induction into the R&R Hall of Fame

Little Walter R&R Hall of Fame film

Blue Midnight: The Film Biography of Little Walter

 

MUSIC

iTunes – Music – Little Walter

Little Walter – Little_walter Vinyl Records, CDs and LPs

Free Music Online – Internet Radio – Jango

Little Walter on Spotify

Amazon.com: Little Walter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Albert King

 

 

 

 

 

Wiki Bio

 

” One of the “Three Kings of the Blues Guitar” (along with B.B. King and Freddie King), Albert King stood 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) (some reports say 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m)) and weighed 250 pounds (110 kg)[2] and was known as “The Velvet Bulldozer”. He was born Albert Nelson on a cotton plantation in Indianola, Mississippi. During his childhood he would sing at a family gospel group at a church where his father played the guitar. One of 13 children, King grew up picking cotton on plantations near Forrest City, Arkansas, where the family moved when he was eight.”

 

 

 

” He began his professional work as a musician with a group called In The Groove Boys in Osceola, Arkansas.[2] Moving north to Gary, Indiana and later St. Louis, Missouri, he briefly played drums for Jimmy Reed‘s band and on several early Reed recordings. Influenced by blues musicians Blind Lemon Jefferson and Lonnie Johnson, the electric guitar became his signature instrument, his preference being the Gibson Flying V which he named “Lucy”. King earned his nickname “The Velvet Bulldozer” during this period as he drove one of them and also worked as a mechanic to make a living.”

 

 

 

” King moved to Gary, Indiana in the early 1950s, then to Chicago in 1953 where he cut his first single for Parrot Records, but it was only a minor regional success.[2] He then went back to St. Louis in 1956 and formed a new band. During this period, he settled on using the Flying V as his primary guitar.[2] He resumed recording in 1959 with his first minor hit, “I’m a Lonely Man,” written by Little Milton, who was Bobbin Records A&R man, a fellow guitar hero, and responsible for King’s signing with the label.”

 

 

 

 

albertking

 

 

 

AllMusic Bio

 

” Albert King is truly a “King of the Blues,” although he doesn’t hold that title (B.B. does). Along with B.B. and Freddie KingAlbert King is one of the major influences on blues and rock guitar players. Without him, modern guitar music would not sound as it does — his style has influenced both black and white blues players from Otis Rush and Robert Cray to Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan. It’s important to note that while almost all modern blues guitarists seldom play for long without falling into a B.B. King guitar cliché, Albert King never does — he’s had his own style and unique tone from the beginning.”

 

 

 

” Albert King plays guitar left-handed, without re-stringing the guitar from the right-handed setup; this “upside-down” playing accounts for his difference in tone, since he pulls down on the same strings that most players push up on when bending the blues notes. King‘s massive tone and totally unique way of squeezing bends out of a guitar string has had a major impact. Many young white guitarists — especially rock & rollers — have been influenced by King‘s playing, and many players who emulate his style may never have heard of Albert King, let alone heard his music. His style is immediately distinguishable from all other blues guitarists, and he’s one of the most important blues guitarists to ever pick up the electric guitar.”

 

 

 

 

 

” Albert King left Bobbin in late 1962 and recorded one session for King Records in the spring of 1963, which were much more pop-oriented than his previous work; the singles issued from the session failed to sell. Within a year, he cut four songs for the local St. Louis independent label Coun-Tree, which was run by a jazz singer named Leo Gooden. Though these singles didn’t appear in many cities — St. Louis, Chicago, and Kansas City were the only three to register sales — they foreshadowed his coming work with Stax Records. Furthermore, they were very popular within St. Louis, so much so that Gooden resented King‘s success and pushed him off the label.”

 

 

 

” Following his stint at Coun-Tree, Albert King signed with Stax Records in 1966. Albert‘s records for Stax would bring him stardom, both within blues and rock circles. All of his ’60s Stax sides were recorded with the label’s house band, Booker T. & the MG’s, which gave his blues a sleek, soulful sound. That soul underpinning gave King crossover appeal, as evidenced by his R&B chart hits — “Laundromat Blues” (1966) and “Cross Cut Saw” (1967) both went Top 40, while “Born Under a Bad Sign” (1967) charted in the Top 50. Furthermore, King‘s style was appropriated by several rock & roll players, most notably Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton, who copied Albert‘s “Personal Manager” guitar solo on the Cream song, “Strange Brew.” Albert King‘s first album for Stax, 1967’s Born Under a Bad Sign, was a collection of his singles for the label and became one of the most popular and influential blues albums of the late ’60s. Beginning in 1968, Albert King was playing not only to blues audiences, but also to crowds of young rock & rollers. He frequently played at the Fillmore West in San Francisco and he even recorded an album, Live Wire/Blues Power, at the hall in the summer of 1968.”

 

 

 

” Early in 1969, King recorded Years Gone By, his first true studio album. Later that year, he recorded a tribute album to Elvis Presley (Blues for Elvis: Albert King Does the King’s Things) and a jam session with Steve Cropper and Pops Staples (Jammed Together), in addition to performing a concert with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. For the next few years, Albert toured America and Europe, returning to the studio in 1971, to record the Lovejoy album. In 1972, he recorded I’ll Play the Blues for You, which featured accompaniment from the Bar-Kaysthe Memphis Horns, and the Movement. The album was rooted in the blues, but featured distinctively modern soul and funk overtones.”

 

 

 

 

 

Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Bio

 

” In 1969, King performed live with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, forming what was called an “87-piece blues band.” During the early Seventies, he recorded the album Lovejoy with a group of white rock singers and an Elvis Presley tribute album, Albert King Does the King’s Things. King continued to tour throughout the Seventies, and in June 1970, he joined the Doors onstage at a show in Vancouver, Canada.”

 

 

 

” King’s sound underwent a major change in the Seventies, as he teamed up with the Bar-Kays and the Memphis Horns on the albums I’ll Play the Blues for You and I Wanna Get Funky. That partnership gave his music a much funkier sound than it had on his earlier recordings, and the former album’s title track became one of his signature songs. King also worked with Allen Toussaint and some of the Meters during this period.”

 

 

 

 

 

Cascade Blues Bio

 ”  If the annals are ever logged as to who the most influential guitar greats of all time were, then there would be no question regarding the inclusion of the three “Kings” of the Blues: B.B.Freddie and Albert. There is little doubt of the impact that each of these artists brought to the future sounds of Blues, Soul and Rock ‘n’ Roll. Albert King was a master of the single-string attack and was intrigued by Blues performers that he heard while growing up outside of Memphis. In turn, he influenced a new generation of guitar players that would include the likes of Jimi HendrixEric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan.”

”  On February 1, 1968, Albert King shared a bill that included John Mayall and Jimi Hendrix for opening night at a new venue in San Francisco called The Fillmore Auditorium. This popular music hall would become a second home for King, and later that same year he returned to record a live album “Live Wire / Blues Power” became one of the best-selling Live Blue! recordings ever and helped establishKing’s career further. Two other albums were released in the early 1990s that were taped during these same performances (“Wednesday Night In San Francisco: Recorded Live At The Fillmore Auditorium” and “Thursday Night In San Francisco…”  Though weaker than the original both serve as true testaments to the talents of Albert King’s guitar.”

” King continued to record with Stax, until the demise of the label in the mid-1970s. The output of this period included some strange mixtures for a Blues musician. In 1969, Albert became the first Blues performer to perform with a symphony orchestra in a concert that teamed him with the St. Louis Symphony. He recorded the album “Lovejoy “at Muscle Shoals with white Southern rockers and even released a tribute album to Elvis Presley, “Blues For Elvis: Albert King Does The King’s Things“. There was even an appearance on a comedy LP by Albert Brooks, “A Star Is Bought“. After Staxfolded, King would record for a number of labels that would include TomatoUtopia and Fantasy, until he decided to retire in the mid-1980s. Though Albert King had given up on recording, he still managed to find time to perform. He made cameo appearances on albums by up-coming Bluesmen like Chris Cain (“Cuttin’ Loose“) and Gary Moore (“Still Got The Blues“). He also made frequent stops at Blues festivals around the world, continuing to influence new generations of guitarists including Stevie Ray Vaughan and Robert Cray.”

” King played his final concert in Los Angeles on December 19, 1992. He died two days later at home in Memphis after suffering a sudden heart attack. After his funeral, a procession was led down Beale Street in a true New Orleans-style Jazz tradition, as the hearse bearing King’s body was led by the Memphis Horns playing “When The Saints Go Marching In“. King was laid to rest across the Mississippi River in the Paradise Gardens Cemetery in Edmondson, Arkansas, not far from where he spent his childhood.”   

“Albert King has been honored by The Blues Foundation with his induction into their Hall of Fame. Both “Born Under A Bad Sign” and “Live Wire / Blues Power” are also honored as Classics of Blues Recordings. But, the real honor for King is the love and everlasting respect that so many of his peers have given him. Stevie Ray Vaughan would call him “Daddy” and John Lee Hooker named him as one of his all-time favorite guitarists. Michael Bloomfield once said, “Albert can take four notes and write a volume. He can say more with fewer notes than anyone I’ve ever known.”  B.B. King stated in his autobiography “He wasn’t my brother in blood, but he sure was my brother in Blues.”  Albert King’s legend will live on.  Every time a Blues or Rock combo is on stage, in an arena or small nightclub, or just playing in their garage and grinds into “Born Under A Bad Sign” or “Crosscut Saw“, his influence will be shining true.”

 

 

 

” King died on December 21, 1992 from a heart attack in his Memphis, Tennessee home. His final concert had been in Los Angeles two days earlier. He was given a funeral procession with the Memphis Horns playing “When The Saints Go Marching In” and buried in Edmondson, Arkansas near his childhood home. B.B. King eulogized him by stating “Albert wasn’t my brother in blood, but he was my brother in blues.”

On December 11th, 2012, it was announced that King would be posthumously inducted into the 2013 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[3] “

 

 

 

 

 Albert Nelson King

    Apr. 25, 1923-Dec. 21, 1992

 

 

Discography

Albums

Born Under A Bad Sign

‎ ◄ (12 versions)

Stax

1967

Live Wire / Blues Power

‎ ◄ (11 versions)

Stax

1968

Albert King , Steve Cropper & Pops Staples – Jammed Together ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Stax

1969

King Of The Blues Guitar

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Atlantic

1969

Years Gone By

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Stax

1969

King Does The King’s Thing

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Stax

1969

Lovejoy

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Stax

1971

I’ll Play The Blues For You

‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Stax

1972

I Wanna Get Funky

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

StaxStax

1974

Albert King / Chico Hamilton / Little Milton – Montreux Festival ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Stax

1974

Travelin “To California

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

King Records (3)

1976

Truckload Of Lovin’

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Utopia (2)

1976

Albert Live

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Utopia (2)

1977

The Pinch

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

StaxEMI

1977

King Albert

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Tomato

1977

Albert

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Tomato

1978

New Orleans Heat

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Tomato

1978

San Francisco ’83

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Fantasy

1983

I’m In A Phone Booth Baby

‎ (LP)

Fantasy

1984

The Lost Session

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Stax

1986

Blues At Sunrise

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Stax

1988

Thursday Night In San Francisco

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Stax Records

1990

Wednesday Night In San Francisco

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Stax

1990

Red House

‎ (LP, Album)

Essential

1991

Crosscut Saw – Albert King In San Francisco

‎ (CD, RM)

Stax

1992

Mean, Mean Blues

‎ (Cass, Album)

Highland Music

1993

Albert King With Stevie Ray Vaughan – In Session ‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Stax

1999

Live 69

‎ (CD, Album)

Tomato

2003

Talkin’ Blues

‎ (CD)

Thirsty Ear

2003

The Big Blues

‎ (LP, Album, RE)

Sundazed Music

2012

Live At The Blues Festival

‎ (LP, Album)

Links

100 GREATEST GUITARISTS

MTV Biography

Albert King: inducted in 2013 | The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame …

Albert King, Mississippi Blues musician – Mississippi writers …

Albert King | Bio, Pictures, Videos | Rolling Stone

Albert King - Profile and Biography of Blues Guitarist Albert King …

Albert King Biography – Musician Biographies

Videos

Wattstax (1973)

Albert King – Live 1/7/78 Full Show

Albert King – Maintenance Shop Blues (Live 1981)

John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers 1982 Jam With Albert King , Etta James …

Stevie Ray Vaughan & Albert King in session 1983

Albert King & Stevie Ray Vaughan — In Session 2010 1983

B.B. King & Albert King – Japan Blues Carnival 1989

Albert King / Canned Heat Aussie Tour 1990

LiveLeak.com – Rock and Roll Hall of Fame – ALBERT KING

Interviews

Albert King – Interview

Albert King – Interview 2

Greg Koch On Meeting Albert King • Wildwood Guitars Story

 

 

 

Music

Albert King – King Albert Vinyl Records, CDs and LPs

iTunes – Music – Albert King – Apple

Albert King on Spotify

Amazon.comAlbert King

Albert King – Listen to Free Music on Pandora …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Ella Fitzgerald

 

 

Wiki Biography

 

” Ella Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as the “First Lady of Song“, “Queen of Jazz“, and “Lady Ella”, was an American jazz vocalist[1] with a vocal range spanning three octaves (D♭3 to D♭6).[2] She was noted for her purity of tone, impeccable diction, phrasing and intonation, and a “horn-like” improvisational ability, particularly in her scat singing.

Fitzgerald was a notable interpreter of the Great American Songbook.[3] Over the course of her 59-year recording career, she sold 40 million copies of her 70-plus albums, won 13 Grammy Awards and was awarded the National Medal of Arts by Ronald Reagan and the Presidential Medal of Freedom by George H. W. Bush.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early Life

 

” Fitzgerald was born in Newport News, Virginia, the daughter of William and Temperance “Tempie” Fitzgerald.[4] The pair separated soon after her birth, and Ella and her mother went to Yonkers, New York, where they eventually moved in with Tempie’s longtime boyfriend, Joseph Da Silva. Fitzgerald’s half-sister, Frances Da Silva, was born in 1923. She and her family were Methodists and were active in the Bethany African Methodist Episcopal Church, and she regularly attended worship services, Bible study, and Sunday School.[5][6]

In her youth, Fitzgerald wanted to be a dancer, although she loved listening to jazz recordings by Louis ArmstrongBing Crosby and The Boswell Sisters. She idolized the lead singer Connee Boswell, later saying, “My mother brought home one of her records, and I fell in love with it….I tried so hard to sound just like her.”[7]

 

 

 

 

 

 

” In 1932, her mother died from a heart attack.[4] Following this trauma, Fitzgerald’s grades dropped dramatically, and she frequently skipped school. Abused by her stepfather, she ran away to her aunt[8] and, at one point, worked as a lookout at a bordello and also with a Mafia-affiliated numbers runner.[9] When the authorities caught up with her, she was first placed in the Colored Orphan Asylum in Riverdale, Bronx.[10] However, when the orphanage proved too crowded, she was moved to the New York Training School for Girls in Hudson, New York, a state reformatory. Eventually she escaped and for a time was homeless.”

 

 

 

Early Career

 

” She made her singing debut at 17 on November 21, 1934, at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, New York. She pulled in a weekly audience at the Apollo and won the opportunity to compete in one of the earliest of its famous “Amateur Nights”. She had originally intended to go on stage and dance, but, intimidated by the Edwards Sisters, a local dance duo, she opted to sing instead in the style of Connee Boswell. She sang Boswell’s “Judy” and “The Object of My Affection,” a song recorded by the Boswell Sisters, and won the first prize of US$ 25.00.[11]

In January 1935, Fitzgerald won the chance to perform for a week with the Tiny Bradshaw band at the Harlem Opera House. She met drummer and bandleader Chick Webb there. Webb had already hired singer Charlie Linton to work with the band and was, The New York Times later wrote, “reluctant to sign her….because she was gawky and unkempt, a diamond in the rough.[7] Webb offered her the opportunity to test with his band when they played a dance at Yale University.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” She began singing regularly with Webb’s Orchestra through 1935 at Harlem’s Savoy Ballroom. Fitzgerald recorded several hit songs with them, including “Love and Kisses” and “(If You Can’t Sing It) You’ll Have to Swing It (Mr. Paganini)“. But it was her 1938 version of the nursery rhyme, “A-Tisket, A-Tasket“, a song she co-wrote, that brought her wide public acclaim.

Chick Webb died on June 16, 1939, and his band was renamed “Ella and her Famous Orchestra” with Ella taking on the role of nominal bandleader. Fitzgerald recorded nearly 150 songs with the orchestra before it broke up in 1942, “the majority of them novelties and disposable pop fluff”.”

 

 

 

Rising Jazz Star

” Going out on her own, Ella Fitzgerald landed a deal with Decca Records. She recorded some hit songs with the Ink Spots and Louis Jordan in the early 1940s. Fitzgerald also made her film debut in 1942’s comedy western Ride ‘Em Cowboy with Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. Her career really began to take off in 1946 when she started working with Norman Granz. Granz orchestrated the Jazz at the Philharmonic, which was a series of concerts and live records featuring most of the genre’s great performers. Fitzgerald also hired Granz to become her manager.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Around this time, Fitzgerald went on tour with Dizzy Gillespie and his band. She started changing her singing style, incorporating scat singing during her performances with Gillespie. Fitzgerald also fell in love with Gillespie’s bass player Ray Brown. The pair wed in 1947, and they adopted a child born to Fitzgerald’s half-sister whom they named Raymond “Ray” Brown Jr. The marriage ended in 1952.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 1950s and ’60s proved to be a time of critical and commercial success for Fitzgerald. She even earned the moniker “The First Lady of Song” for her mainstream popularity and unparalleled vocal talents. Her unique ability to mimicking instrumental sounds helped popularize the vocal improvisation of “scatting” which became her signature technique.”

 

 

 

 

 

” In 1955, Fitzgerald began recording for Granz’s newly created Verve Records. She made some of her most popular albums for Verve, starting out with 1956’s Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Cole Porter Song Book. Two years later, Fitzgerald picked up her first two Grammy Awards for two later songbook projects—Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Duke Ellington Song Book and Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Irving Berlin Song Book. She actually worked directly with Ellington on that album.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” A truly collaborative soul, Fitzgerald produced great recordings with such artists as Louis Armstrong and Count Basie. She also performed several times with Frank Sinatra over the years as well. In 1960, Fitzgerald actually broke into the pop charts with her rendition of “Mack the Knife.” She was still going strong well into the ’70s, playing concerts across the globe. One especially memorable concert series from this time was a two-week engagement in New York City in 1974 with Frank Sinatra and Count Basie.”

 

 

Worldwide Recognition

 

” Ella continued to work as hard as she had early on in her career, despite the ill effects on her health. She toured all over the world, sometimes performing two shows a day in cities hundreds of miles apart. In 1974, Ella spent a legendary two weeks performing in New York with Frank Sinatra and Count Basie. Still going strong five years later, she was inducted into the Down Beat magazine Hall of Fame, and received Kennedy Center Honors for her continuing contributions to the arts.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Outside of the arts, Ella had a deep concern for child welfare. Though this aspect of her life was rarely publicized, she frequently made generous donations to organizations for disadvantaged youths, and the continuation of these contributions was part of the driving force that prevented her from slowing down. Additionally, when Frances died, Ella felt she had the additional responsibilities of taking care of her sister’s family.

In 1987, United States President Ronald Reagan awarded Ella the National Medal of Arts. It was one of her most prized moments. France followed suit several years later, presenting her with their Commander of Arts and Letters award, while Yale, Dartmouth and several other universities bestowed Ella with honorary doctorates.”

 

 

 

 

” In September of 1986, Ella underwent quintuple coronary bypass surgery. Doctors also replaced a valve in her heart and diagnosed her with diabetes, which they blamed for her failing eyesight. The press carried rumors that she would never be able to sing again, but Ella proved them wrong. Despite protests by family and friends, including Norman, Ella returned to the stage and pushed on with an exhaustive schedule.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” By the 1990s, Ella had recorded over 200 albums. In 1991, she gave her final concert at New York’s renowned Carnegie Hall. It was the 26th time she performed there.

As the effects from her diabetes worsened, 76-year-old Ella experienced severe circulatory problems and was forced to have both of her legs amputated below the knees. She never fully recovered from the surgery, and afterward, was rarely able to perform. During this time, Ella enjoyed sitting outside in her backyard, and spending time with Ray, Jr. and her granddaughter Alice. “I just want to smell the air, listen to the birds and hear Alice laugh,” she said.

On June 15, 1996, Ella Fitzgerald died in her Beverly Hills home. Hours later, signs of remembrance began to appear all over the world. A wreath of white flowers stood next to her star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and a marquee outside the Hollywood Bowl theater read, “Ella, we will miss you.”

After a private memorial service, traffic on the freeway was stopped to let her funeral procession pass through. She was laid to rest in the “Sanctuary of the Bells” section of the Sunset Mission Mausoleum at Inglewood Park Cemetery in Inglewood, California. “

 

 

 

 

 

Ella Fitzgerald

 

April 25, 1918-June 15, 1996

 

Discography

Albums

Souvenir Album

‎ (10″, Album)

Decca 1949

Ella Sings Gershwin

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Brunswick 1950

Songs In A Mellow Mood

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Decca 1954

Peggy Lee And Ella Fitzgerald – Songs From Pete Kelly’s Blues ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Decca 1955

Ella FitzgeraldLena Horne , and Billie Holiday – Ella, Lena, And Billie ‎ (LP)

Columbia 1955

Sweet And Hot

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Brunswick 1956

Sings The Cole Porter Songbook

‎ ◄ (17 versions)

Verve Records 1956

Sings The Rodgers And Hart Song Book

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve Records 1956

Like Someone In Love

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve Records 1957

Ella And Her Fellas

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Decca 1957

Ella Fitzgerald / Count Basie / Joe Williams – One O’Clock Jump ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1957

Ella Fitzgerald With Duke Ellington And His Orchestra – Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Duke Ellington Song Book ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1957

Ella Fitzgerald With Duke Ellington And His Orchestra – Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Duke Ellington Song Book Vol. 2 ‎ (2xLP, Mono)

Verve Records 1957

Ella Fitzgerald & Billie Holiday – At Newport ‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1958

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Duke Ellington Song Book, Vol. 1

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1958

Ella Fitzgerald At The Opera House

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1958

Sings The Irving Berlin Songbook

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1958

Ella Swings Lightly

‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Verve Records 1958

The First Lady Of Song

‎ (LP, Mono)

Decca 1958

Hello Love

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Verve Records 1959

Get Happy

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve RecordsVerve Records 1959

Sings The Rodgers And Hart Songbook Volume 2

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1959

Sings The Rodgers And Hart Song Book Volume 1

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1959

Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Song Book – Volume One 

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1959

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Song Book (Volume Two)

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1959

Sings The George & Ira Gershwin Song Book Vol. 5

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1959

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Gershwin Song Book Vol. 2

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1959

Sings Sweet Songs For Swingers

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1959

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Gershwin Song Book Vol. 1

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1959

Ella Wishes You A Swinging Christmas

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Verve Records 1960

Mack The Knife – Ella In Berlin

‎ ◄ (31 versions)

Verve Records 1960

Sings The Rodgers And Hart Song Book Volume 1

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1960

Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Song Book – Volume Four

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1960

Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Song Book – Volume Three

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1960

Clap Hands, Here Comes Charlie!

‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Verve Records 1961

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Harold Arlen Song Book

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1961

Ella In Hollywood

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve Records 1961

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Irving Berlin Song Book, Volume 1

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1961

Ella

‎ (LP)

Brunswick 1961

Sings The Irving Berlin Songbook, Volume 2

‎ (LP)

Verve Records 1961

Ella Fitzgerald With Nelson Riddle And His Orchestra – Ella Fitzgerald Swings Brightly With Nelson ‎◄ (9 versions)

Verve Records 1962

Rhythm Is My Business

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1962

Ella Fitzgerald With Count Basie And His Orchestra* – Ella And Basie! ‎ ◄ (15 versions)

Verve Records 1963

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Jerome Kern Song Book

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1963

These Are The Blues

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve RecordsVerve Records 1963

Ella Fitzgerald with Rodgers & HammersteinLerner & LoeweAdler* & Ross*, Frank Loesser – Ella Sings Broadway ‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1963

Hello, Dolly!

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1964

Ella At Juan-Les-Pins

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1964

Ella In Hamburg

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve RecordsStern Musik 1965

Ella At Duke’s Place

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve Records 1965

Ella Fitzgerald

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Metro Records 1965

Ella Fitzgerald With Marty Paich And His Orchestra* – Whisper Not ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1966

Hello Ella!

‎ (LP, Album)

PolydorBertelsmann Club 1966

Ella Fitzgerald / Duke Ellington – Ella & Duke At The Côte D’Azur Vol.2 ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1967

Brighten The Corner

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Capitol Records 1967

Smooth Sailing

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Decca 1967

Ella Fitzgerald / Duke Ellington – Ella & Duke At The Côte D’Azur ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1967

Ella Fitzgerald’s Christmas

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Capitol Records 1967

Ella In Concert

‎ (LP, Album)

Verve Records 1967

Ella Live

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1968

30 By Ella

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Capitol Records 1968

Misty Blue

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Capitol Records 1968

Walkin’ In The Sunshine

‎ (LP, Album)

Sounds Superb 1968

Ella

‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Reprise Records 1969

Sunshine Of Your Love

‎ ◄ (12 versions)

MPS RecordsMPS Records 1969

Things Ain’t What They Used To Be (And You Better Believe It)

‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Reprise Records 1971

Ella A Nice

‎ (LP, Album)

CBS 1971

Ella Fitzgerald

‎ (LP, Album, Ltd)

SupraphonGramofonový Klub 1971

Ella Loves Cole

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Atlantic 1972

Newport Jazz Festival Live At Carnegie Hall, July 5, 1973

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Columbia 1973

Memories

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

MCA Coral 1973

I Maestri

‎ (LP)

Capitol RecordsEMI 1973

Ella In London

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Records 1974

Joe Pass & Ella Fitzgerald – Take Love Easy ‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Pablo Records 1974

Ella Fitzgerald At The Montreux Jazz Festival 1975

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Pablo Records 1975

It’s Only A Papermoon

‎ (LP)

S*R InternationalS*R International 1975

Chick Webb And His Orchestra Featuring Ella Fitzgerald – Silver Star Swing Series Presents Chick Webb And His Orchestra ‎ (LP)

MCA Coral 1975

Ella Fitzgerald & Chick Webb Orchestra, The* – Ella Fitzgerald & The Chick Webb Orchestra ‎ (LP)

Record International Service 1975

Элла Фитцджеральд

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Мелодия 1976

Ella Fitzgerald & Oscar Peterson – Ella And Oscar ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Pablo Records 1976

Ella Fitzgerald / Joe Pass – Fitzgerald & Pass…Again ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Pablo Records 1976

Basin Street Blues

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Intercord 1976

Ella Fitzgerald With Tommy Flanagan Trio, The* – Montreux ’77 ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Pablo Live 1977

The Rodgers And Hart Song Book

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1977

Ella Fitzgerald & Cole Porter – Dream Dancing ‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Pablo Records 1978

Ella Fitzgerald And Nelson Riddle Orchestra, The* – The George And Ira Gershwin Songbook ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1978

Ella Fitzgerald With Jackie Davis And Louie Bellson* – Lady Time ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Records 1978

Lionel HamptonCount BasieDuke EllingtonElla FitzgeraldLouis Armstrong – Original History Of Jazz ‎ (2xLP, Gat)

Amati 1978

Ella Fitzgerald And Nelson Riddle Orchestra, The* – The George And Ira Gershwin Songbook ‎ (Cass, RE, Dou)

Verve Records 1978

Ella

‎ (2xLP)

Lakeshore Music 1978

Fine And Mellow, Ella Fitzgerald Jams

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Pablo Records 1979

I Grandi Del Jazz

‎ (LP)

Fabbri Editori 1979

Ella Fitzgerald & Billie Holiday – Ella Fitzgerald Und Billie Holiday ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

AMIGA 1980

Ella Fitzgerald And Count Basie – A Perfect Match ‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Pablo Records 1980

Ella FitzgeraldCount BasieJoe PassNiels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen – Digital III At Montreux ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Live 1980

The Duke Ellington Songbook

‎ (2xLP, Album, RE)

Verve Records 1980

Ella Abraça Jobim – Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Antonio Carlos Jobim Song Book

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Pablo Records 1981

Webb On The Air

‎ (LP)

Jazz Bird 1981

The Best Is Yet To Come

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Records 1982

Ella Fitzgerald Sings Count Basie Plays With Count Basie Orchestra, The* – A Classy Pair ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Today 1982

The Duke Ellington Songbook, Volume Two: The Small Group Sessions

‎ (2xLP, Gat)

Verve Records 1982

Ella FitzgeraldJoe Pass – Speak Love ‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Pablo Records 1983

Ella À Nice

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Pablo Live 1983

The Ella Fitzgerald Set

‎ (LP, Mono)

Verve Records 1983

Sings The Johnny Mercer Song Book

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1984

Ella FitzgeraldDuke Ellington – The Stockholm Concert, 1966 ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Pablo Live 1984

Sings The Harold Arlen Song Book

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1984

Live And Rare

‎ (LP)

Delta Music 1984

Ella Fitzgerald And Joe Pass – Easy Living ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Records 1986

The Very Thought Of You

‎ (LP)

Contour 1987

Sentimental Journey

‎ (LP, Album)

Hallmark Records 1988

Ella In Rome – The Birthday Concert

‎ (Vinyl, Album)

Verve RecordsGong 1988

I’ve Got You Under My Skin

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Success 1989

For The Love Of Ella

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1989

Ella / Things Ain’t What They Used To Be (And You Better Believe It)

‎ (CD, Album)

Reprise Records 1989

Ella Returns To Berlin

‎ (CD)

Verve Records 1991

Элла Фитцджеральд Поёт Произведения Дюка Эллингтона / Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Duke Ellington Song Book

‎ (LP)

Мелодия 1991

Ella Fitzgerald With Nelson Riddle And His Orchestra – Ella Swings Gently With Nelson ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1993

Ella Fitzgerald Sings Songs From Let No Man Write My Epitaph

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Classic Records 1994

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Songbooks

‎ (4xCD, Album, RE, Dig)

Verve Records 1998

Frank Sinatra + Ella Fitzgerald + Antonio Carlos Jobim – A Man And His Music + Ella + Jobim ‎ (DVD-A, Mono)

Warner Reprise Video 1999

Ella Fitzgerald & Joe Pass – Sophisticated Lady ‎ (CD, Album)

Pablo Records 2001

Sings The George & Ira Gershwin Songbook

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Not Now Music 2010

Newport Jazz Festival Live At Carnegie Hall, July 5, 1973

‎ (2xLP, Album, Ltd)

Analogue Productions 2012

Links

The Official Web Site of Ella Fitzgerald

Ella Fitzgerald - Music Biography, Credits and Discography : …

Ella Fitzgerald 1954Ella Fitzgerald, Brubeck, Coltrane and …

Ella Fitzgerald – PBS: Public Broadcasting Service

Ella Fitzgerald : NPR

Ella Fitzgerald @ All About Jazz

Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation

 

 

 

Concert Videos

Joe Pass & Ella Fitzgerald – Duets in Hannover 1975

Ella Fitzgerald and Oscar Peterson Live Paris Olympia 63 part II

Ella Fitzgerld Live at The Montreux Jazz Festival 1977

Ella Fitzgerald Live Jazz festival in Cannes 1958 part II

ella fitzgerald in berlin feat. freddie waits

 

 

 

Interviews

Ella Fitzgerald interview 1974

Bobbie Wygant Interviews Ella Fitzgerald

ELLA FITZGERALD BIOGRAPHY PART  Of 11

Music

iTunes – Music - Ella Fitzgerald - Apple

Ella Fitzgerald on Spotify

Amazon.com: Ella Fitzgerald: Songs, Albums, Pictures, Bios

Ella Fitzgerald - Listen to Free Music Pandora

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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