Tag Archive: Capitalism


Lying Commies

 

 

 

 

 

” “UNDER capitalism”, ran the old Soviet-era joke, “man exploits man. Under communism it is just the opposite.” In fact new research suggests that the Soviet system inspired not just sarcasm but cheating too: in East Germany, at least, communism appears to have inculcated moral laxity.

  Lars Hornuf of the University of Munich and Dan Ariely, Ximena García-Rada and Heather Mann of Duke University ran an experiment last year to test Germans’ willingness to lie for personal gain. Some 250 Berliners were randomly selected to take part in a game where they could win up to €6 ($8).”

 

 

The results were less than surprising …

 

 

” After finishing the game, the players had to fill in a form that asked their age and the part of Germany where they had lived in different decades. The authors found that, on average, those who had East German roots cheated twice as much as those who had grown up in West Germany under capitalism. They also looked at how much time people had spent in East Germany before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The longer the participants had been exposed to socialism, the greater the likelihood that they would claim improbable numbers of high rolls.”

 

The Economist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Occupy Wall Street And The Tea Party

 

” Some say there are important parallels between Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party. I do not see them, only minor and inconsequential similarities highlighted much by those who have a proneness to anarchy.

Occupy attacks Free Market Capitalism, not just “corporations.” Corporations are for them the most visible sign of the evils of Market economics. Tea Party attacks cronyism, that is, corporations that align with power to get undue advantage. Big difference: one attacks corporations to dissect Capitalism and the other attacks corporations to bring about real Free Markets.

Occupy sees the solution for Corporatism in Statism. They want to give government even greater power to reign in corporations. They are blinded to the fact that the biggest corporation is Big Government, which has the power to confiscate and kill and the power to lure corporations that are willing to surrender to political pressure for advantage. In attacking unruly corporations they incentivize even more cronyism. In the end, their solution, of necessity, ends in totalitarianism. The more they attack corporations and empower government, the more Corporatism is empowered until they see no other choice than to offer all power to the State.

Tea Party sees the problem in Big Government first and in corporations in a subsidiary way. By limiting the power of government one limits the lure of power to attract corporations. If there is nothing for them in aligning with government they can only compete openly and win or fail. Or they can act illegally to get advantage but knowing that government is not there to protect them. When government is reign in to limit its purpose to protecting our liberty, government becomes a source of good and a true steward of our liberty.

As you can see, there is no comparison between Occupy and the Tea Party, no matter how many fake similarities some want to establish. “
Ismael Hernandez, Freedom & Virtue Institute,www.fvinstitute.org

 

 

 

 

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Capitalism

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Capitalism

 

 

Harry Reid, Jon Corzine And Other Cronies That Got Away In 2012

 

 

” When businesses and big government politicians go into “business” with one another, taxpayers lose—big time. It’s called cronyism.

A “crony” is an individual or organization that colludes with politicians to gain unfair treatment, taxpyer-funded benefits, or regulations that the rest of us don’t enjoy. Cronyism occurs because politicians rely on wealthy interests to fund their campaigns, and those donors then seek government goodies or favors in return.

It’s a match made in heaven for cronies and hell for taxpayers. Just as bad, such cronyism erodes economic freedom by destroying the real competition that fuels free market capitalism.

 

In 2012, the cronies had a banner year, poaching billions of taxpayer dollars to pump up their profits and redistribute their losses.

 

In 2012, the cronies had a banner year, poaching billions of taxpayer dollars to pump up their profits and redistribute their losses. In other instances, the cronies leveraged their insider connections to evade prosecutions and skirt the laws that apply to the rest of us. Consider just a few of the cronies that got away in 2012.

1. Jon Corzine, former MF Global Chief, New Jersey Governor, and Top Obama Bundler.”

 

 

 

Capitalism

Capitalism

 

 

We Pay For Our Own Destruction

Poll: Majority Of Young Americans Want Government To Do More

 

 

  ” Five-nine percent said the United States needs bigger government, while 37 percent responded that the government is doing too many things that should be left up to individuals and the private sector. Furthermore, 53 percent said the government needs to expand its role in health care.

“The rise in young people embracing paternalistic government comes as no shock,” said Gabriella Hoffman, a field coordinator for the Leadership Institute, in an interview with the Daily Caller. “Most have developed contempt for free enterprise and limited government from their college professors who inject anti-free market, socialist and even Marxist views into their lectures.”

The First Thanksgiving

 

Where There Is Work There Is Plenty 

 

” “The experience that we had in this common course and condition,'” Bradford wrote. “‘The experience that we had in this common course and condition tried sundry years…that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing — as if they were wiser than God,’ Bradford wrote.” This was his way of saying, it didn’t work, we thought we were smarter than everybody, everybody was gonna share equally, nobody was gonna have anything more than anything else, it was gonna be hunky-dory, kumbaya. Except it doesn’t work. Because of half of them didn’t work, maybe more. They depended on the others to do all the work. There was no incentive.

“‘For this community [so far as it was] was found to breed much confusion and discontent, and retard much employment that would have been to their benefit and comfort. For young men that were most able and fit for labor and service did repine that they should spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children without any recompense,'” without being paid for it, “‘that was thought injustice.'” They figured it out real quick. Half the community is not working — living off the other half, that is. Resentment built. Why should you work for other people when you can’t work for yourself? that’s what he was saying. So the Pilgrims found that people could not be expected to do their best work without incentive. So what did Bradford’s community try next? They unharnessed the power of good old free enterprise by invoking the under-girding capitalistic principle of private property.

“Every family was assigned its own plot of land to work and permitted to market its own crops and products. And what was the result? ‘This had very good success,’ wrote Bradford, ‘for it made all hands industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been.’ … Is it possible that supply-side economics could have existed before the 1980s? Yes,” it did. “Now, this is where it gets really good, folks, if you’re laboring under the misconception that I was, as I was taught in school. So they set up trading posts and exchanged goods with the Indians.” This is what happened. After everybody had their own plot of land and were allowed to market it and develop it as they saw fit and got to keep what they produced, bounty, plenty resulted. “

Economic Growth, Not Redistribution, Most Benefits The Poor, Working People, And The Middle Class

 

World map showing countries by nominal GDP per...

 

” Stephen Moore and Julian L. Simon note in their underappreciated work, It’s Getting Better All the Time: 100 Greatest Trends of the Last 100 Years, that in the last century,1900 to 2000, real per capita GDP in America grew by nearly 7 times, meaning the American standard of living grew by that much as well. The authors explain:

“It is hard for us to imagine, for example, that in 1900 less than one in five homes had running water, flush toilets, a vacuum cleaner, or gas or electric heat.  As of 1950 fewer than 20 percent of homes had air conditioning, a dishwasher, or a microwave oven.  Today between 80 and 100 percent of American homes have all of these modern conveniences.”

Indeed, in 1900 only 2% of homes in America enjoyed electricity.  As Cox and Alm note further in their insightful Myths of Rich and Poor, “Homes aren’t just larger.  They’re also much more likely to be equipped with central air conditioning, decks and patios, swimming pools, hot tubs, ceiling fans, and built in kitchen appliances.  Fewer than half of the homes built in 1970 had two or more bathrooms; by 1997, 9 out of 10 did.”

Such economic growth produced dramatic improvements in personal health as well.  Throughout most of human history, a typical lifespan was 25 to 30 years, as Moore and Simon report.  But “from the mid-18th century to today, life spans in the advanced countries jumped from less than 30 years to about 75 years.”  Average life expectancy in the U.S. has grown by more than 50% since 1900.  Infant mortality declined from 1 in 10 back then to 1 in 150 today.  Children under 15 are at least 10 times less likely to die, as one in four did during the 19th century, with their death rate reduced by 95%.  The maternal death rate from pregnancy and childbirth was also 100 times greater back then than today. “

 

 

A Lecture By Ayn Rand

 

 

“An exposition of capitalism and of the crucial question its enemies evade.”

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