Tag Archive: Guitar


Son House – The Original Delta Blues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published on May 25, 2012

” http://www.antesprove.blogspot.com.br
https://www.facebook.com/AntesProve

http://www.amazon.com/Original-Delta-…

Tracklist:
1. Death Letter
2. Pearline
3. Louise Mcghee
4. John The Revelator
5. Empire State Express
6. Preachin’ Blues
7. Grinning In Your Face
8. Sundown
9. Levee Camp Moan
10. Pony Blues
11. Downhearted Blues “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Loan Me A Dime – Boz Scaggs & Duane Allman

 

 

 

Uploaded on Apr 24, 2011

” “Loan Me A Dime”
(Felton Robinson, Mike Middlebrook, Jesse Anderson)

Vocals & rhythm guitar – Boz Scaggs
Lead Guitar – Duane Allman
Drums – Roger Hawkins
Bass – David Hood
Piano – Barry Beckett
Rhythm guitar – Jimmy Johnson
Horns – Memphis Horrns
Duane Allman – “An Anothology Volume 1″
Boz Scaggs – “Boz Scaggs”

Recorded at Muscle Shoals Studios, Muscle Shoals Alabama, May 5, 1969 “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Son Seals 2000@Billy Blues Last Show

 

 

 

Uploaded on Jul 4, 2011

” This would be the first and last time that I would get to see Son Seals. This was the first video I did for my Thru da KeyholeTV public access show in Austin, Texas, using a Hi8 cameras. This was at Billy Blues in Houston,TX. I messed up a lot, but Son Seals said it was nothing but the blues. I’m glad that I had gotten this footage cause this is the last recorded performance before his death. Billy Blues has close since then to. Son Seals will be missed. camera Michael Hayes-2000 “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Johnny Copeland – Ohne Filter – In Concert With Steve Morse

 

 

 

Muddy Waters Featuring Johnny Winter – Chicago Fest 1981

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clapton & Knopfler – Same Old Blues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B.B. King Live In Bellinzona Switzerland 2001

 

 

Uploaded on Oct 19, 2011

” B.B.King – Guitar “Lucille”, Vocals
Leon Warren – Guitar
James Toney – Keyboard
Michael Doster – Bass
Calep Emphrey Jr. – Drums
Stanley Abernathy – Trumpet
James Bolden – Trumpet
Melvin Jackson – Saxophone
Walter King – Big Baritone

01. Ain`t No Love In The Heart Of The City
02. Introducing B.B.King Jam
03. Let The Good Times Roll
04. I`ll Survive
05. Bad Case Of Love
06. Peace Of Mind
07. Caledonia
08. Summertime
02. Early In The Morning
09. Ain`t That Just Like A Woman
10. You Are My Sunshine
11. The Thrill Is Gone
12. I Know
13. Don`t Go No Farther
14. Please Accept My Love
15. Makin` Love Is Good For You “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legends Live At Montreux 1997

 

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Dec 26, 2011

” Complete concert “Legends Live at Montreaux 97″

Marcus Miller: Bass guitar
Eric Clapton: Guitar and Vocals
Steve Gadd: Drums
Joe Sample: Keyboards
David Sanborn: Saxophone

TRACK LIST
1) Full House @00:00:36
2) Groovin’ @00:10:01
3) Ruthie @00:17:04
4) Snakes @00:22:36
5) Going Down Slow @00:34:39
6) The Peeper @00:41:01
7) In Case You Hadn’t Noticed @00:50:32
8) Third Degree @00:57:13
9) First Song / Tango Blues @01:04:00
10) Put It Where You Want It @01:13:05
11) Shreveport Stomp @01:28:41
12) In A Sentimental Mood / Layla – @1:30:40
13) Every Day I Have The Blues @01:39:20

Thx to @albatroz424 to the timing. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blues Guitar Documentary – “Busking The Blues” Starring Keni Lee Burgess

 

 

 

Published on Jan 18, 2013

” I shot this film almost 3 years ago! Keni Lee Burgess, who has loads of guitar tutorials here on youtube, allowed me to follow him around the streets and subways of Manhattan to document his lifestyle, that being a busker.

  I was so incredibly lucky that I was able to make contact with the son of the inventor of the resonator guitar John E Dopyera. Although the film was super fun to make, the end result from a film makers stand point is that I wasn’t happy with the video quality. I shot on a miniDV camera, wish I had an HD at that time but couldn’t afford one.

  Please enjoy the film. Feel free to leave feed back. Please visit kenilee burgess here on youtube.

  Produced/Directed/filmed/Editing/Sound design/Graphics by George Canzaniello

Regards,
George Canzaniello
Film maker “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Cray: Cookin’ In Mobile 2010

 

 

 

Published on May 21, 2013

” Cookin’ In Mobile is a live CD/DVD released by five-time Grammy award winner Robert Cray. It was released on July 27, 2010, through Vanguard Records. It is his first live concert released on DVD to date, and his third live album. The concert was recorded February 21, 2010 at the historic Saenger Theatre in Mobile Alabama. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gary Moore & The Midnight Blues Band – Live at Montreux 1990

 

 

 

 

Published on Nov 24, 2012

” Gary Moore & The Midnight Blues Band – Live at Montreux 1990 is a live DVD by Gary Moore. Recorded live on June 21, 1990.

  Founded in 1967, the Montreux Jazz Festival is recognized as one of the most prestigious annual music events in the world. This 1990 performance was the first for Gary Moore at the event. He has since played the festival on a regular basis. This was a part of the tour supporting his Still Got the Blues album. Albert Collins was a featured guest at this performance.

  The DVD, released in 2004 by Eagle Vision, includes three bonus songs from Gary Moore’s 1997 performance at Montreux. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eric Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival 2004

 

 

 

Published on Oct 10, 2012

” The Crossroads Guitar Festival is a music festival and benefit concert first held in 2004 and again in 2007 and 2010. The festivals benefit the Crossroads Centre founded by Eric Clapton, a drug treatment center located in Antigua. The concerts are also intended to be a showcase for a variety of guitarists. All were hand-picked by Eric Clapton himself, who addressed the 2007 audience, saying that each were some of the very best, and those who had earned his respect.
6 June 2004 – Crossroads Guitar Festival
Crossroads Guitar Festival
Fair Park and Cottonbowl Stadium Dallas, TX
United States
This is not the double DVD.

Songs:

0:03:30 “Layla” by Eric Clapton
0:11:42 “Killing Floor” by Hubert Sumlin feat Eric Clapton, Robert Cray & Jimmie Vaughan
0:16:44 “Sweet Home Chicago” feat Buddy Guy, Eric Clapton, Robert Cray, Hubert Sumlin & Jimmie Vaughan
0:23:01 “Six StringsDown” feat Jimmie Vaughan, Eric Clapton, Robert Cray & Robert Randolph
0:28:08 “I’m a man of constant sorrow” feat Dan Tyminski & Ron Block
0:32:22 “Steamroller” feat James Taylor & Joe Walsh
0:38:05 “Oklahoma Borderline feat Vince Gill & Jerry Douglas
0:43:15 “After Midnight” feat J.J. Cale & Eric Clapton
0:48:15 “City Love” feat John Mayer
0:58:00 “Rock Me Baby” B B King, Eric Clapton & Jimmie Vaughan
1:04:52 “Funk 49″ feat Joe Walsh
1:12:10 “The March” feat Robert Randolph & The Family Band
1:18:55 “Jingo” feat Carlos Santana & Eric Clapton
1:29:04 “If I Had Possession Over Judgement Day” feat Eric Clapton
1:33:00 “Time Makes Two” feat Robert Cray
1:38:45 “La Grange” feat ZZ Top
1:44:18 “Tush” feat ZZ Top
1:48:16 “Cocaine” feat Eric Clapton

My thank to jenshaag for this track list “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Albert King & Stevie Ray Vaughan — In Session 2010 1983

 

 

 

 

Albert King & Stevie Ray Vaughan — In Session 2010 1983

 

 

 

 

 

Eric Sardinas – “Tribute To Stevie Ray”

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Aug 27, 2011

” On the eve of the anniversary of Stevie Ray Vaughan’s death, Eric Sardinas plays a moving tribute . “

Earl King And Roomful Of Blues

 

 

 

Published on Jun 4, 2014

” Earl King & Roomful of Blues (with Ronnie Earl) performing at Montreux Jazz Festival, july 9, 1987. I only have a small part of the concert on VHS, digitalized it and thought it would be nice to share.
Video quality is not that good, but what the heck, it’s all about the music.
Info as to the complete show:

  Earl King (g) Porky Cohen (tb) Rich Lataille (as) Bob Enos (tp) Doug James (bs) Ronnie Earl (g) Paul Tomasello (b) Junior Branthey (p) John Rossi (dr) Greg Piccolo (ts)

1. Okie Dokie Stomp
2. Real In A Rockin
3. Yes Indeed
4. He Knows The Rules
5. 3 Hours Pas Midnight
6. Caravan (instrum)
7. Dressed Up To Get Messed Up
8. Real Gone Lover
9. Everyday I Have The Blues
10. Those Lonely, Lonely Nights
11. Your Love Was Never There
12. Love Rent
13. Things I Used To Do
14. It All Went Down The Drain
15. Let The Good Times Roll

Tracks here are:
0:00 Everyday I Have The Blues (cuts in)
4:55 Those Lonely, Lonely Nights
9:02 Your Love Was Never There
15:10 Love Rent
21:15 Things I Used To Do
26:12 It All Went Down The Drain

I don’t own the material, but am happy to share those wonderful moments.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Stevie Ray Vaughan” – VH1′s Legends http://youtu.be/5BIeeUFVcEM

“Someday After A While” “Have You Ever Loved A Woman” “Tore Down”

From The Ballyshannon Boy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on May 2, 2006

” Played in France in 1980. It’s the same concert as “off the handle” is played”

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday To The King Of The Blues

 

 

Introduction

” Riley B. King (born September 16, 1925), known by the stage name B.B. King, is an American blues musician, singer, songwriter, and guitarist.

  Rolling Stone magazine ranked him at No. 6 on its 2011 list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time (previously ranked No. 3 in the 2003 edition of the same list), and he was ranked No. 17 in Gibson’s “Top 50 Guitarists of All Time”.According to Edward M. Komara, King “introduced a sophisticated style of soloing based on fluid string bending and shimmering vibrato that would influence virtually every electric blues guitarist that followed.”King was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987. He is considered one of the most influential blues musicians of all time, earning the nickname “The King of Blues”, and one of the “Three Kings of the Blues Guitar” (along with Albert King and Freddie King). King is also known for performing tirelessly throughout his musical career, appearing at 250-300 concerts per year until his seventies. In 1956 it was noted that he appeared at 342 shows. King continues to appear at 100 shows a year.

  Over the years, King has developed one of the world’s most identifiable guitar styles. He borrowed from Blind Lemon Jefferson, T-Bone Walker and others, integrating his precise and complex vocal-like string bends and his left hand vibrato, both of which have become indispensable components of rock guitarists’ vocabulary. His economy and phrasing has been a model for thousands of players. King has mixed blues, jazz, swing, mainstream pop and jump into a unique sound. In King’s words, “When I sing, I play in my mind; the minute I stop singing orally, I start to sing by playing Lucille.”

 

 

 

Early Career

” A singer and guitarist born into a sharecropping family on September 16, 1925, in Itta Bena, Mississippi, B.B. King—born Riley B. King—became one of the best-known blues performers, an important consolidator of blues styles, and a primary model for rock guitarists. Following his service in the U.S. Army, he began his career as a disc jockey in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was dubbed “the Beale Street Blues Boy.” That nickname was soon shortened to “B.B.”

  King made his first recording in 1949, and the next year began a 12-year-long association with Kent/RPM/Modern, for which he recorded a string of rhythm and blues hits, including “You Know I Love You,” “Woke Up This Morning” and “Three O’Clock Blues,” his first national hit. He also toured the nightclub circuit continuously, averaging more than 300 shows annually for over 30 years. His style of music earned him the title “King of the Blues.”

  Coincidentally, the year that King made his first recording was also the same year that he named his beloved guitar. King attended a dance in Twist, Arkansas, that had a barrel lit with kerosene in the middle of the dance floor, used to keep the crowd warm late at night. While there, a fight broke out and the barrel was knocked over, causing a fire to spread throughout the venue. Everyone evacuated, including King, but he rushed back inside to retrieve his prized guitar. Luckily, he managed to escape with his guitar as the building collapsed around him. King later learned that the fight erupted because of a woman who worked at the venue named Lucille. From then on, King named his guitar “Lucille” to remind himself never to do anything so foolish again.”

 

 

 

Beale Street Blues Boy

” After serving briefly in the army, King moved in with his cousin Booker (Bukka) White, also a blues guitarist. King’s attempts to copy Bukka’s playing helped him develop his own style. He sought out Sonny Boy Williamson, who had a radio show on WDIA in West Memphis, and asked to play a song for him. Williamson was so impressed with King that he offered King his own radio show and a chance to play regularly at Miss Annie’s 16th Street Grill. King was able to advertise his upcoming concerts on the radio, and soon he and his trio had become popular. Known on the radio as the “Beale Street Blues Boy,” which was shortened to “Bee-Bee,” and then to his famous initials, King decided he wanted to make records.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” King was signed to Bullet Records and in 1949 recorded four songs at the radio station, including “Miss Martha King” and “I’ve Got the Blues.” He also continued to perform in the area. Musician and talent scout Ike Turner (1931–) connected King with the Kent/Modern/RPM record label, and King’s King’s 1951 single for his new label, “Three O’Clock Blues,” became a hit. He scored several other hits during these years, and by the mid-1950s he was playing about three hundred shows a year. He would maintain this schedule for over twenty years.”

 

 

 

  

The Fifties & Sixties

” The 1950s saw King establish himself as a perennially formidable hitmaking force in the R&B field. Recording mostly in L.A. (the WDIA air shift became impossible to maintain by 1953 due to King‘s endless touring) for RPM and its successor Kent, King scored 20 chart items during that musically tumultuous decade, including such memorable efforts as “You Know I Love You” (1952); “Woke Up This Morning” and “Please Love Me” (1953); “When My Heart Beats like a Hammer,” “Whole Lotta’ Love,” and “You Upset Me Baby” (1954); “Every Day I Have the Blues” (another Fulson remake), the dreamy blues ballad “Sneakin’ Around,” and “Ten Long Years” (1955); “Bad Luck,” “Sweet Little Angel,” and a Platters-like “On My Word of Honor” (1956); and “Please Accept My Love” (first cut by Jimmy Wilson) in 1958. King‘s guitar attack grew more aggressive and pointed as the decade progressed, influencing a legion of up-and-coming axemen across the nation.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” In 1960, King‘s impassioned two-sided revival of Joe Turners “Sweet Sixteen” became another mammoth seller, and his “Got a Right to Love My Baby” and “Partin’ Time” weren’t far behind. But Kent couldn’t hang onto a star like King forever (and he may have been tired of watching his new LPs consigned directly into the 99-cent bins on the Biharis‘ cheapo Crown logo). King moved over to ABC-Paramount Records in 1962, following the lead of Lloyd Price, Ray Charles, and before long, Fats Domino.

  In November of 1964, the guitarist cut his seminal Live at the Regal album at the fabled Chicago theater and excitement virtually leaped out of the grooves. That same year, he enjoyed a minor hit with “How Blue Can You Get,” one of his many signature tunes. “Don’t Answer the Door” in 1966 and “Paying the Cost to Be the Boss” two years later were Top Ten R&B entries, and the socially charged and funk-tinged “Why I Sing the Blues” just missed achieving the same status in 1969. “

 

 

 

 

The Later Years

” Although B.B. King was a huge star in the African-American music community by 1965 he was still mostly unknown in the White community. This would change in 1965 when Elektra Records released Paul Butterfield’s first Butterfield Blues Band album, featuring the late Mike Bloomfield on guitar. Bloomfield became a star, almost overnight, and when he was asked where he learned to play the way he did, he replied, “By copying B.B.’s licks.” No one knew who “B.B.” was. And when they asked, “B.B.” who? Bloomfield replied, “The real monster; B.B. King.” After this happened B.B. King’s popularity soared. In short order “The Thrill Is Gone” became a big hit, he stopped having to play the “chitlin circuit” small town black clubs and started playing larger jazz clubs, dining rooms of luxury resort hotels, college concerts and rock palaces such as Filmore East .”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” In 1969 B.B. made his first appearance on network television on Johnny Carson’s the “Tonight Show.” In 1971 B.B. sang and played on Ed Sullivan’s show. By this time Sidney A. Seidenberg had come on board as B.B.’s new manager, he helped re-negotiate his old recording contracts with ABC/MCA records and got him major new bookings.

  Since the 1970′s B.B. King’s career has moved at a rapid pace up hill. He has recorded over 75 records, has received seven Grammy Awards, including its Lifetime Achievement Award in 1987, has been inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame, 1984, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, 1987, become a Member of the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame, 1990, received the Presidential Medal of the Arts, 1990, the Orville H. Gibson Lifetime Achievement Award, 1991, the Kennedy Center Honors, 1995, Presidential Medal of Freedom, American Heritage Fellowship Award by the National Endowment of the Arts, Three NAACP Image Awards, an MTV Video Music Award, 1989/89, a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and many, many more.

  He has won 22 Downbeat Music Magazine Readers and Critics Poll Awards, 5 Guitar Player Magazine Awards, he has received an Honorary Doctorate of Music from Yale University and fathered 15 children. He has toured with U2 as the super rock group’s opening act and had a song, “When Love Comes to Town, written for him by U2′s star, lead singer, Bono. B.B. King still works between 250 and 300 days a year, calling himself a “music workaholic.” He lives ( when he takes time to rest ) in Las Vegas, Nevada. and currently plays a Gibson ES-355, a guitar he has been playing for over 25 years. He has played all over the world including Africa, Europe, China, Japan, Australia and New Zealand and is properly referred to everywhere as “The Ambassador of the Blues,” a title he so richly deserves.”

 

 

 

” B.B. King has influenced the guitar playing of; Eric Clapton, the late Mike Bloomfield, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Albert Collins, Albert King and Jimi Hendrix. He is one of this country’s living, national treasures, a humble but proud, spiritual and beautiful human being, and still “King of the Blues.” “

 

 

 

 

Discography

Year Album Label AllMusic Rating User Ratings
Singin’ the Blues
1956 Singin’ the Blues album review Pure Pleasure Records
(15)
The Blues
1960 The Blues album review Ace
(42)
Sings Spirituals
1960 Sings Spirituals album review Diablo (UK)
(7)
B.B. King Wails
1960 B.B. King Wails album review
(17)
My Kind of Blues
1961 My Kind of Blues album review EMI-Capitol Special Markets
(7)
More
1961 More album review P-Vine Records
(0)
Easy Listening Blues
1962 Easy Listening Blues album review Pony Canyon Records
(5)
Twist with B.B. King 1962 Twist with B.B. King
(0)
Blues in My Heart
1962 Blues in My Heart album review Ace
(2)
Blues for Me 1962 Blues for Me
(2)
A Heart Full of Blues
1962 A Heart Full of Blues P-Vine Records
(2)
Swing Low 1963 Swing Low United Recordings
(0)
Mr. Blues [ABC]
1963 Mr. Blues [ABC] album review ABC Music
(5)
Rock Me Baby [Kent] 1964 Rock Me Baby [Kent]
(1)
Let Me Love You 1965 Let Me Love You album review P-Vine Records
(0)
Boss of the Blues
1965 Boss of the Blues P-Vine Records
(2)
Live at the Regal
1965 Live at the Regal album review MCA
(236)
Live! B. B. King on Stage 1965 Live! B. B. King on Stage
(0)
Confessin' the Blues 1965 Confessin’ the Blues album review ABC Music
(5)
Turn on to B.B. King 1966 Turn on to B.B. King album review
(0)
The Original Sweet Sixteen 1966 The Original Sweet Sixteen album review
(1)
9 X 9.5 1966 9 X 9.5 United Recordings
(0)
R&B Soul 1967 R&B Soul Ember
(0)
Blues Is King [MCA]
1967 Blues Is King [MCA] album review MCA / Universal Special Products
(13)
Lucille
1968 Lucille album review MCA
(16)
Blues on Top of Blues
1968 Blues on Top of Blues album review Beat Goes On
(13)
Live & Well
1969 Live & Well album review Beat Goes On
(16)
The Feeling They Call the Blues, Vol. 2 1969 The Feeling They Call the Blues, Vol. 2 Trio
(0)
The Feeling They Call the Blues 1969 The Feeling They Call the Blues Trio
(0)
Completely Well
1969 Completely Well album review MCA
(41)
The Incredible Soul of B.B. King 1970 The Incredible Soul of B.B. King album review
(0)
Indianola Mississippi Seeds
1970 Indianola Mississippi Seeds album review MCA
(40)
Live in Cook County Jail
1971 Live in Cook County Jailalbum review MCA
(101)
Live in Japan
1971 Live in Japan album review MCA
(17)
In London
1971 In London album review Beat Goes On
(18)
L.A. Midnight 1972 L.A. Midnight album review
(6)
Guess Who
1972 Guess Who album review MCA
(9)
To Know You Is to Love You
1973 To Know You Is to Love You album review MCA
(10)
Friends
1974 Friends Beat Goes On
(2)
Together for the First Time...Live
1974 Together for the First Time…Live album review MCA
(15)
Together for the First Time 1974 Together for the First Time album review Dunhill Compact Classics
(1)
Together Again...Live
1976 Together Again…Live album review MCA
(6)
King Size 1977 King Size album review ABC Music
(2)
Midnight Believer
1978 Midnight Believer album review MCA
(7)
Take It Home
1979 Take It Home album review MCA
(8)
Rarest B.B. King 1980 Rarest B.B. King Blues Boy
(1)
Live
1980 Live “Now Appearing” at Ole Miss album review MCA
(3)
There Must Be a Better World Somewhere
1981 There Must Be a Better World Somewhere album review Beat Goes On
(7)
Love Me Tender
1982 Love Me Tender album review MCA
(4)
Blues 'n' Jazz
1983 Blues ‘n’ Jazz album review MCA
(6)
Six Silver Strings
1985 Six Silver Strings album review MCA
(8)
One Nighter Blues 1987 One Nighter Blues Ace
(1)
Introducing B.B. King 1987 Introducing B.B. King MCA
(0)
Doing My Thing, Lord 1988 Doing My Thing, Lord Kent
(0)
Across the Tracks 1988 Across the Tracks Ace
(0)
Lucille Had a Baby 1989 Lucille Had a Baby Ace
(0)
Live at the Apollo
1990 Live at the Apollo album review GRP
(10)
I Like to Live the Love
1990 I Like to Live the Love album review MCA Special Products
(0)
Live at San Quentin
1991 Live at San Quentin album review MCA
(8)
There Is Always One More Time
1992 There Is Always One More Time album review MCA
(7)
Better Than Ever 1993 Better Than Ever Kent
(0)
Blues Summit
1993 Blues Summit album review MCA
(18)
B.B. King/Mayfield/Flack 1994 B.B. King/Mayfield/Flack Castle Music Ltd.
(0)
Live in Kansas City
1994 Live in Kansas City Charly Records
(7)
True Blue
1994 True Blue Sequel
(2)
Swing Low Sweet Chariot
1995 Swing Low Sweet Chariot Prime Cuts
(2)
On the Road with B.B King 1996 On the Road with B.B King MCA
(0)
The Masters of the Blues [Delta]
1997 The Masters of the Blues [Delta] album review Delta Distribution
(0)
Paying the Cost to Be the Boss
1997 Paying the Cost to Be the Boss album review Laserlight
(1)
Deuces Wild
1997 Deuces Wild album review MCA
(34)
King Biscuit Flower Hour Presents B.B. King
1998 King Biscuit Flower Hour Presents B.B. King album review King Biscuit Entertainment
(2)
Blues on the Bayou
1998 Blues on the Bayou album review MCA
(36)
Let the Good Times Roll: The Music of Louis Jordan
1999 Let the Good Times Roll: The Music of Louis Jordan album review MCA
(22)
Makin' Love Is Good for You
2000 Makin’ Love Is Good for You album review MCA
(10)
Riding with the King
2000 Riding with the King album review Reprise
(213)
A Night in Cannes
2001 A Night in Cannes Purple Pyramid/Cleopatra / Cleopatra
(2)
A Christmas Celebration of Hope
2001 A Christmas Celebration of Hope album review MCA
(5)
Reflections
2003 Reflections album review MCA
(6)
80
2005 80 album review Geffen
(20)
Live
2008 Live album review Geffen
(45)
One Kind Favor
2008 One Kind Favor album review Geffen
(202)
Live at the Royal Albert Hall 2011
2012 Live at the Royal Albert Hall 2011 album review Shout! Factory
(134)

Concert Films 

BB King Africa 1974

B.B. King – Live in Dallas (1983)

B.B. King & Friends – A Blues Session [live in L.A. 1987]

B.B.King Live in Bonn 1994

A Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan with Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy and BB King – 1996

B B King & Band Live at B B King Blues Clubs Nashville & Menphis 2006

 

 

 

Interviews

B.B. King 1968 Interview

A talk with B.B. King

BB King – Blues Master

B.B. King: First Gig

Interview with B.B. King – North Sea jazz 2000

B.B. King interview 1989 – U2 “discover” B.B. King!

BB King – Johnny Winter – Blues, Interviews & Jam

B.B. King: The Life of Riley Official Trailer 1 (2014) – Documentary HD

B B King – The Life of Riley – Interview

 

 

 

Happy Birthday To The King Of The Blues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rollin’ & Tumblin’

 

 

 

 

Blues Legend Johnny Winter Dies At Age 70 In Zurich

 

 

 

 

 

” Texas blues legend Johnny Winter, known for his collaborations with the likes of Jimi Hendrix and childhood hero Muddy Waters, has died at the age of 70.

  His representative, Carla Parisi, confirmed today that Winter died in a hotel room in Zurich, Switzerland, on Wednesday. There was no immediate word on the cause of death.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Winter was a leading light among the white blues guitar players, including Eric Clapton and the late Stevie Ray Vaughan, who followed in the footsteps of the earlier Chicago blues masters. 

Winter idolized Waters — and got a chance to produce some of the blues legend’s more popular albums.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Rolling Stone magazine named Winter one of the top 100 guitarists of all time and he was famed for his lightening-fast blues guitar riffs and striking long white hair.

  His representative’s statement said his wife, family and bandmates were all saddened by the loss of one of the world’s finest guitarists.”

 

 

 

    Johnny may have departed this earth but thanks to his music we are “still alive & well” … RIP Mr Winter your absence will be forever felt .

 

 

 

   Read more about the legend’s death here and look for an in-depth tribute to one of our favorite guitarists very soon…

Daily Video 7.7.14

Hound Dog Taylor & Little Walter – Wild About You Baby

 

 

 

Uploaded on Nov 18, 2007

” Hound Dog Taylor & the Houserockers featuring Little Walter on harmonica. This was back in 1967. 

My account was deleted a while ago so I re-uploaded this one again. I thought it was kind a shame this one was deleted of youtube because we had some very nice discussions going, with even people like Billy Branch commenting! “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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