Tag Archive: Medal of Honor


Long Wait Ends This Week As Swenson Receives Medal of Honor

 

 

” It’s sadly fitting that William Swenson’s Medal of Honor ceremony at the White House on Tuesday has been overshadowed by the government shutdown and the looming debt ceiling crisis.

That’s because Swenson’s heroism at the Battle of Ganjgal in September 2009 has already been overshadowed by the mistakes of his superiors and bureaucratic delays. The former soldier waited more than four years for his recognition, much to the chagrin of his friends and military advocates.”

 

 

 

 

” Swenson, who left the Army in 2011, is the sixth living Medal of Honor recipient for action in Afghanistan, and the second for that fight in the Ganjgal Valley. Former Marine Dakota Meyer was awarded the medal two years ago for his part of that fight, dodging gunfire in another part of the steep terrain before meeting up with Swenson for the final push against the enemy.”

 

 

 

 

” Swenson declined media interviews in the lead-up to the White House ceremony and has been mostly silent since the battle. In an Army release, he called the medal an honor for “those I served with” and “my family and my teammates.” “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Medal of Honor Recipient Shows Bravery, Tenderness

 

 

 

” Just this week, the White House announced that Army Capt. Will Swenson would receive the Medal of Honor for his actions in one of the most hard-fought battles of the Afghan war – in Ganjgal Valley in Kunar Province on Sept. 8, 2009. 

Five Americans were killed that day. Two others — Swenson and Marine Corp. Dakota Meyer — would receive the Medal of Honor.

Now, more than four years after the battle, an extraordinary video has come to light which shows Swenson in action. This is not a recreation. It’s the real thing.

Swenson is the one without a helmet, while bullets flew all around.

“Everybody was taking fire,” said Sgt. Kevin Duerst of the California National Guard, the crew chief of a medevac helicopter that flew into the valley. “The whole valley was just a giant ambush. It was crazy.”

Both he and the pilot recorded the battle with cameras attached to their helmets, producing the dramatic video.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medal of Honor Belonging To Civil War General Joshua Chamberlain Is Discovered Hidden In Old Book At CHURCH SALE

” The medal of honor presented to Joshua Chamberlain for his role in the Battle of Gettysburg has been returned to the Civil War General’s hometown after being found at a church sale. “

Civil War find: General Chamberlain's Medal of Honor has been returned to a museum devoted to him

” The medal, awarded in 1893, three decades after the historic battle, was returned to the Brunswick museum housed in the General’s former home by an anonymous person who found it in a book. “

Chamberlain

 

 

” Its return is timely, arriving back in Maine in time for the 150th anniversary of the famous civil war battle.

After being examined by experts from the Smithsonian and the Army, it was revealed as the General’s medal, which had been presented to him by President Grover Cleveland for ‘distinguished gallantry’.

Chamberlain fought in at least 24 battles during the Civil War, was wounded six times and had six horse shot from under him.

He is best remembered for the battle of Little Round Top, on the second day of Gettysburg, when he helped Union forces hold off a rebel attack.

 

 

 

 

 

 


See ‘MURPH: The Protector’ In A Real Movie Theater

 

” OK, here’s one for all our readers who say they never go to the movies because Hollywood never puts out anything they want to see. Regal Cinemas has teamed up with the producers of a new documentary called MURPH: The Protector for a limited nationwide release in select theaters on Friday, March 22nd.

MURPH: The Protector tells the life story of U.S. Navy SEAL Lt. Michael Murphy. He joined the Navy after graduating from Penn State, served in Iraq and Afghanistan and was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in 2007.”

 

 

Lieutenant Michael P. Murphy
United States Navy (SEAL)
May 7, 1976 – June 28, 2005

Lt. Michael P. Murphy, fondly referred to by friends and family as “Murph,” was born May 7, 1976 in Smithtown, N.Y. and grew up in the New York City commuter town of Patchogue, N.Y. on Long Island.

Murphy grew up active in sports and attended Patchogue’s Saxton Middle School. In high school, Murphy took a summer lifeguard job at the Brookhaven town beach in Lake Ronkonkoma — a job he returned to each summer through his college years. Murphy graduated from Patchogue-Medford High School in 1994.

Murphy attended Penn State University, where he was an exceptional all-around athlete and student, excelling at ice hockey and graduating with honors. He was an avid reader; his reading tastes ranged from the Greek historian Herodotus to Tolstoy’s “War and Peace.” Murphy’s favorite book was Steven Pressfield’s “Gates of Fire,” about the Spartan stand at Thermopylae. In 1998, he graduated with a pair of Bachelor of Arts degrees from Penn State — in political science and psychology.

Following graduation, he was accepted to several law schools, but instead he changed course.  Slightly built at 5 feet 10 inches, Murphy decided to attend SEAL mentoring sessions at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point with his sights on becoming a U.S. Navy SEAL. Murphy accepted an appointment to the Navy’s Officer Candidate School at Pensacola, Fla., in September, 2000.

Murphy was commissioned as an ensign in the Navy on Dec. 13, 2000, and began Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) training in Coronado, Calif., in January 2001, graduating with Class 236. BUD/S is a six-month training course and the first step to becoming a Navy SEAL.

Upon graduation from BUD/S, he attended the Army Jump School, SEAL Qualification Training and SEAL Delivery Vehicle (SDV) school. Lt. Murphy earned his SEAL Trident and checked on board SDV Team (SDVT) 1 in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii in July of 2002. In October of 2002, he deployed with Foxtrot Platoon to Jordan as the liaison officer for Exercise Early Victor.

Following his tour with SDVT-1, Lt. Murphy was assigned to Special Operations Central Command in Florida and deployed to Qatar in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. After returning from Qatar, Lt. Murphy was deployed to the Horn of Africa, Djibouti, to assist in the operational planning of future SDV missions.

In early 2005, Murphy was assigned to SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team 1 as assistant officer in charge of ALFA Platoon and deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

On June 28, 2005, Lt. Murphy was the officer-in-charge of a four-man SEAL element in support of Operation Red Wing tasked with finding key anti-coalition militia commander near Asadabad, Afghanistan. Shortly after inserting into the objective area, the SEALs were spotted by three goat herders who were initially detained and then released. It is believed the goat herders immediately reported the SEALs’ presence to Taliban fighters.

A fierce gun battle ensued on the steep face of the mountain between the SEALs and a much larger enemy force. Despite the intensity of the firefight and suffering grave gunshot wounds himself, Murphy is credited with risking his own life to save the lives of his teammates. Murphy, intent on making contact with headquarters, but realizing this would be impossible in the extreme terrain where they were fighting, unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his own life moved into the open, where he could gain a better position to transmit a call to get help for his men.

Moving away from the protective mountain rocks, he knowingly exposed himself to increased enemy gunfire.  This deliberate and heroic act deprived him of cover and made him a target for the enemy.  While continuing to be fired upon, Murphy made contact with the SOF Quick Reaction Force at Bagram Air Base and requested assistance. He calmly provided his unit’s location and the size of the enemy force while requesting immediate support for his team. At one point, he was shot in the back causing him to drop the transmitter. Murphy picked it back up, completed the call and continued firing at the enemy who was closing in.  Severely wounded, Lt. Murphy returned to his cover position with his men and continued the battle.

As a result of Murphy’s call, an MH-47 Chinook helicopter, with eight additional SEALs and eight Army Night Stalkers aboard, was sent in as part of the QRF to extract the four embattled SEALs. As the Chinook drew nearer to the fight, a rocket-propelled grenade hit the helicopter, causing it to crash and killing all 16 men aboard.

On the ground and nearly out of ammunition, the four SEALs, continued to fight.  By the end of a two-hour gunfight that careened through the hills and over cliffs, Murphy, Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class (SEAL) Danny Dietz and Sonar Technician 2nd Class (SEAL) Matthew Axelson had fallen. An estimated 35 Taliban were also dead.  The fourth SEAL, Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class (SEAL) Marcus Luttrell, was blasted over a ridge by a rocket-propelled grenade and knocked unconscious. Though severely wounded, the fourth SEAL and sole survivor, Luttrell, was able to evade the enemy for nearly a day; after which local nationals came to his aide, carrying him to a nearby village where they kept him for three more days. Luttrell was rescued by U.S. Forces on July 2, 2005.

By his undaunted courage, intrepid fighting spirit and inspirational devotion to his men in the face of certain death, Lt. Murphy was able to relay the position of his unit, an act that ultimately led to the rescue of Luttrell and the recovery of the remains of the three who were killed in the battle.

Lt. Murphy was buried at Calverton National Cemetery less than 20 miles from his childhood home. Lt. Murphy’s other personal awards include the Purple Heart, Combat Action Ribbon, the Joint Service Commendation Medal, the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Ribbon and National Defense Service Medal.

Lt. Murphy is survived by his mother Maureen Murphy; his father Dan Murphy; and his brother John Murphy. Dan and Maureen Murphy, who were divorced in 1999, remain close friends and continue to live in N.Y.  Their son John, 22, attends the New York Institute of Technology, and upon graduation will  pursue a career in criminal justice, having been accepted to the New York City Police Deparment.

murphy_medals

Operation Red Wings

” Operation Red Wings was a failed counter-insurgent mission in Kunar province, Afghanistan, involving four members of the United States Navy SEALs. Murphy and two other SEALs were killed in the fighting in addition to 16 American Special Operations Forces soldiers who were killed when their helicopter was shot down while attempting to extract the SEAL Team. Prior to a helicopter being shot down in 2011,[4][5] it was both the largest loss of life for American forces since the invasion began[6] and the largest loss for the SEALs since the Vietnam War. Marcus Luttrell was the only surviving American sailor from the squad; he was protected by local villagers who sent an emissary to the closest military base allowing a rescue team to locate him.

Murphy led the four-man reconnaissance team on a mission to kill or capture a top Taliban leader, Ahmad Shah(code name Ben Sharmak),[7] who commanded a group of insurgents known as the “Mountain Tigers,”[8] west ofAsadabad.[9][10] The group was dropped off by helicopter in a remote, mountainous area east of Asadabad in Kunar Province, near the Pakistan border. After an initially successful infiltration, local goat herders stumbled upon the SEALs’ hiding place. Unable to verify any hostile intent from the herders,[11] Murphy asked the team what should be done with them. Matthew Axelson reportedly voted to kill the Afghans, and Danny Dietz did not offer an opinion, causing Murphy to state that he would vote the same as Marcus Luttrell, who said the herders should be set free.[9]Hostile locals, possibly the goat herders they let pass, alerted 150 to 200[citation needed] nearby Taliban forces, who surrounded and attacked the small group. After Murphy called for help, an MH-47 Chinook helicopter loaded with reinforcements was dispatched to rescue the team, but was shot down with an RPG, killing all 16 personnel aboard; eight SEALs and eight service members from the 160th SOAR.[1]

By the end of the two-hour battle, an undisclosed number of Taliban soldiers (which is estimated at 70% by some sources), Murphy, Dietz, and Axelson were killed in the action. Luttrell was the only American survivor and was eventually rescued after several days of wandering the mountain and being protected by the people of an Afghanistan village.[1] All three of Murphy’s men were awarded the Navy’s second-highest honor, the Navy Cross, for their part in the battle making theirs the most decorated Navy SEAL team in history.[12]

File:Navy SEALs in Afghanistan prior to Red Wing.jpgSEALs of Operation Red Wings, Murphy is on the far right

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CLINT ROMESHA, MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENT, DECLINES INVITATION BY MICHELLE OBAMA TO THE STATE OF THE UNION SPEECH

 

 

 

” The former Army staff sergeant who was awarded the Medal of Honor by President Barack Obama Monday is declining the first lady’s invitation to be her guest at Tuesday’s State of the Union address.

Clint Romesha, who was awarded the prestigious medal for uncommon valor in Afghanistan, told CNN that he has decided to spend the evening with friends from his former unit, Black Knight Troop, 3-61 CAV, his wife Tammy — with whom he celebrates a wedding anniversary Tuesday — and their families.

“It’s such a great honor to be invited to the State of the Union,” Romesha, 31, told CNN. “I really feel bad about not being able to go. But a lot of these guys I haven’t seen a really long time and I’d like to hang with them just a little bit more.”

Romesha said he also wants “to be there with the family, especially on the 13th wedding anniversary of me and Tammy,” his high school sweetheart.”

 

 

 

SSG Clinton Romesha To Receive Congressional Medal Of Honor Today

 

 

 

” For his actions at Combat Outpost Keating as recounted in Jake Tapper’s excellent book, The Outpost, Staff Sergeant Clinton Romesha will receive the Congressional Medal of Honor at a White House ceremony scheduled for 1:30pm EST today.

The Army’s official narrative:

 

At 6 a.m., Oct. 3, 2009, Combat Outpost Keating in Kamdesh District, Nuristan Province, Afghanistan, came under complex attack by an enemy force estimated at 400 fighters. The fighters occupied the high ground on all four sides of the combat outpost and initiated the attack with concentrated fire from B10 recoilless rifles, rocket-propelled grenades, known as RPGs, DSHKA heavy machine gun fire, mortars, and small-arms fire.Staff Sgt. Clinton L. Romesha displayed extraordinary heroism through a day-long engagement in which he killed multiple enemy fighters, recovered fallen Soldiers, and led multiple recovery, resupply, and counterattack operations.”

Honor at Last for Roy P Benavidez

 

“I did this as a way to honor all those who have struggled to come back from serving our country in times of war. The most interesting part for me was something I didn’t find out until after I created this photoplay, was that this was Roy’s second tour. He had been so gravely wounded, by stepping on a landmine, on his first tour that he was drummed out of the Army after returning. Roy built his body back up and returned to the service after proving himself fit and joined the elite Green Beret’s and went back to Vietnam for a second tour for which he received the Medal of Honor.”

MSG Roy Benavidez speech 1991

 

Army Medal of Honor

Memorial to Roy P Benavidez

Rank: Master Sergeant
Organization: U.S. Army
Company: Detachment B-56
Division: 5th Special Forces Group
Born: 5 August 1935, DeWitt County, Cuero, Texas
Departed: Yes
Entered Service At: Houston, Texas June 1955
G.O. Number:
Date of Issue:
Accredited To:
Place / Date: West of Loc Ninh on 2 May 1968

Citation

” Master Sergeant (then Staff Sergeant) Roy P. Benavidez United States Army, who distinguished himself by a series of daring and extremely valorous actions on 2 May 1968 while assigned to Detachment B56, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 2 May 1968, a 12-man Special Forces Reconnaissance Team was inserted by helicopters in a dense jungle area west of Loc Ninh, Vietnam to gather intelligence information about confirmed large-scale enemy activity. This area was controlled and routinely patrolled by the North Vietnamese Army. After a short period of time on the ground, the team met heavy enemy resistance, and requested emergency extraction. Three helicopters attempted extraction, but were unable to land due to intense enemy small arms and anti-aircraft fire. Sergeant Benavidez was at the Forward Operating Base in Loc Ninh monitoring the operation by radio when these helicopters returned to off-load wounded crewmembers and to assess aircraft damage. Sergeant Benavidez voluntarily boarded a returning aircraft to assist in another extraction attempt. Realizing that all the team members were either dead or wounded and unable to move to the pickup zone, he directed the aircraft to a nearby clearing where he jumped from the hovering helicopter, and ran approximately 75 meters under withering small arms fire to the crippled team. Prior to reaching the team’s position he was wounded in his right leg, face, and head. Despite these painful injuries, he took charge, repositioning the team members and directing their fire to facilitate the landing of an extraction aircraft, and the loading of wounded and dead team members. He then threw smoke canisters to direct the aircraft to the team’s position. Despite his severe wounds and under intense enemy fire, he carried and dragged half of the wounded team members to the awaiting aircraft. He then provided protective fire by running alongside the aircraft as it moved to pick up the remaining team members. As the enemy’s fire intensified, he hurried to recover the body and classified documents on the dead team leader. When he reached the leader’s body, Sergeant Benavidez was severely wounded by small arms fire in the abdomen and grenade fragments in his back. At nearly the same moment, the aircraft pilot was mortally wounded, and his helicopter crashed. Although in extremely critical condition due to his multiple wounds, Sergeant Benavidez secured the classified documents and made his way back to the wreckage, where he aided the wounded out of the overturned aircraft, and gathered the stunned survivors into a defensive perimeter. Under increasing enemy automatic weapons and grenade fire, he moved around the perimeter distributing water and ammunition to his weary men, reinstilling in them a will to live and fight. Facing a buildup of enemy opposition with a beleaguered team, Sergeant Benavidez mustered his strength, began calling in tactical air strikes and directed the fire from supporting gunships to suppress the enemy’s fire and so permit another extraction attempt. He was wounded again in his thigh by small arms fire while administering first aid to a wounded team member just before another extraction helicopter was able to land. His indomitable spirit kept him going as he began to ferry his comrades to the craft. On his second trip with the wounded, he was clubbed from additional wounds to his head and arms before killing his adversary. He then continued under devastating fire to carry the wounded to the helicopter. Upon reaching the aircraft, he spotted and killed two enemy soldiers who were rushing the craft from an angle that prevented the aircraft door gunner from firing upon them. With little strength remaining, he made one last trip to the perimeter to ensure that all classified material had been collected or destroyed, and to bring in the remaining wounded. Only then, in extremely serious condition from numerous wounds and loss of blood, did he allow himself to be pulled into the extraction aircraft. Sergeant Benavidez’ gallant choice to join voluntarily his comrades who were in critical straits, to expose himself constantly to withering enemy fire, and his refusal to be stopped despite numerous severe wounds, saved the lives of at least eight men. His fearless personal leadership, tenacious devotion to duty, and extremely valorous actions in the face of overwhelming odds were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect the utmost credit on him and the United States Army. “

Obama Hijacks Medal of Honor Winner’s Funeral To Talk About His Own Vacation

 

INOUYE, DANIEL K. Photo

 

 

 

Words Obama Could Have Read But Didn’t 

 

 

Citation

” Second Lieutenant Daniel K. Inouye distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action on 21 April 1945, in the vicinity of San Terenzo, Italy. While attacking a defended ridge guarding an important road junction, Second Lieutenant Inouye skillfully directed his platoon through a hail of automatic weapon and small arms fire, in a swift enveloping movement that resulted in the capture of an artillery and mortar post and brought his men to within 40 yards of the hostile force. Emplaced in bunkers and rock formations, the enemy halted the advance with crossfire from three machine guns. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Second Lieutenant Inouye crawled up the treacherous slope to within five yards of the nearest machine gun and hurled two grenades, destroying the emplacement. Before the enemy could retaliate, he stood up and neutralized a second machine gun nest. Although wounded by a sniper’s bullet, he continued to engage other hostile positions at close range until an exploding grenade shattered his right arm. Despite the intense pain, he refused evacuation and continued to direct his platoon until enemy resistance was broken and his men were again deployed in defensive positions. In the attack, 25 enemy soldiers were killed and eight others captured. By his gallant, aggressive tactics and by his indomitable leadership, Second Lieutenant Inouye enabled his platoon to advance through formidable resistance, and was instrumental in the capture of the ridge. Second Lieutenant Inouye’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.”

 

 

Army Medal of Honor

 

 

Instead He Spoke Of His Favorite Topic Of Conversation … Himself 

 

 

 

 

” You know when you’re talking about a Medal of Honor winner and the highest ranked Asian elected official, there might be a few other topics to talk about then your own vacation memories, but well, Obama loves his vacations. He doesn’t love much else, but he sure loves his vacations. And talking about himself.

And Obama combined his two great passions, vacations and talking about himself, in true classy style at Senator Inouye’s funeral.

“Now, even though my mother and grandparents took great pride that they had voted for him, I confess that I wasn’t paying much attention to the United States Senate at the age of four or five or six.  It wasn’t until I was 11 years old that I recall even learning what a U.S. senator was, or it registering, at least.”

Death must be a truly horrifying phenomenon for Obama. Other people at least take comfort in knowing that their country and their family will go on, but for Obama there is nothing else. Everything only exists in relation to him in a completely solipsistic universe.

Senator Inouye only exists in relation to Obama. “

 

 

 

Do You Know ?

Which President Was Awarded The Medal Of Honor ?

 

 

Army Medal of Honor

 

 

” Citation Lieutenant Colonel Theodore Roosevelt distinguished himself by acts of bravery on 1 July, 1898, near Santiago de Cuba, Republic of Cuba, while leading a daring charge up San Juan Hill. Lieutenant Colonel Roosevelt, in total disregard for his personal safety, and accompanied by only four or five men, led a desperate and gallant charge up San Juan Hill, encouraging his troops to continue the assault through withering enemy fire over open countryside. Facing the enemy’s heavy fire, he displayed extraordinary bravery throughout the charge and was the first to reach the enemy trenches, where he quickly killed one of the enemy with his pistol, allowing his men to continue the assault. His leadership and valor turned the tide in the Battle for San Juan Hill. Lieutenant Colonel Roosevelt’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army. “

 

 

The Medal of Honor

Above and Beyond the Call of Duty

 

 “The Medal of Honor is the nation’s highest medal for valor in combat that can be awarded to members of the armed forces.

The medal was first authorized in 1861 for Sailors and Marines, and the following year for Soldiers as well. Since then, more than 3,400 Medals of Honor have been awarded to members of all DoD services and the Coast Guard. Medals of Honor are awarded sparingly and are bestowed only to the bravest of the brave; and that courage must be well documented. The most recent Army recipients are Sgt. 1st Class Leroy A. PetryStaff Sgt. Salvatore A. GiuntaStaff Sgt. Robert J. Miller and Sgt. 1st Class Jared C. Monti.

Today on Army Live, we honor Medal of Honor recipient, Corporal Gordon M. Craig.  Cpl. Gordon’s actions during the Korean War on September 10, 1950 awarded him the highest medal in the land. Read Cpl. Gordon’s citation below:”

 

Click the link to read Cpl Craig’s citation .

Remember

MEMORIAL DAY

The military don’t start wars.  Politicians start wars.  ~William Westmoreland

Remember

Nathan Hale, Spy and State Hero

Nathan Hale, a martyr soldier of the American Revolution, was born in Coventry, Conn., June 6, 1755. When but little more than twenty-one years old he was hanged, by order of General William Howe, as a spy, in the city of New York, on September 22, 1776.”

Napoleon :

“Soldiers usually win the battles and generals get the credit for them.”

Remember

“Historians know little about Crispus Attucks, and they have constructed accounts of his life more from speculation than facts. Most documents described his ancestry as African and American Indian. His father, Prince Yonger, is thought to have been a slave brought to America from Africa and that his mother, Nancy Attucks, was a Natick Indian. The family, which may have included an older sister named Phebe, lived in Framingham, Massachusetts.”

Otto Von Bismarck :

“Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think hard before starting a war.”

Remember

“Not all of the women soldiers of the Civil War were discharged so quickly. Some women served for years, like Sarah Emma Edmonds Seelye, and others served the entire war, like Albert D. J. Cashier. These two women are the best known and most fully documented of all the women combatants.”

General Ulysses S Grant :

 “Wherever the enemy goes, let our troops go also.”

Remember

The Battle of Chickamauga    35,000 Casualties 

September 18-20, 1863

“After the Tullahoma Campaign, Rosecrans renewed his offensive, aiming to force the Confederates out of Chattanooga. The three army corps comprising Rosecrans’ s army split and set out for Chattanooga by separate routes. In early September, Rosecrans consolidated his forces scattered in Tennessee and Georgia and forced Bragg’s army out of Chattanooga, heading south.”

Albert Pike :

“What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal”

Remember

26th Colored US Pennsylvania

Giuseppe Garibaldi :

“I offer neither pay, nor quarters, nor food; I offer only hunger, thirst, forced marches, battles and death. Let him who loves his country with his heart, and not merely with his lips, follow me.”

Remember

                                     

The Spanish-American War

John “Black Jack” Pershing :

“The deadliest weapon in the world is a Marine and his rifle!”

Remember

The Argonne World War I

General George S Patton :

 “Always do everything you ask of those you command.”

Remember

D Day , Omaha Beach

General Robert E Lee

  “What a cruel thing is war:  to separate and destroy families and friends, and mar the purest joys and happiness God has granted us in this world; to fill our hearts with hatred instead of love for our neighbors, and to devastate the fair face of this beautiful world.”

Remember

The Forgotten War , Korea

Plato :

  “Only the dead have seen the end of war. “

Remember

Viet Nam

Jeane J. Kirkpatrick :

 “We have war when at least one of the parties to a conflict wants something more than it wants peace.”  

Remember

Urgent-fury-grenada-500-9

Operation : Urgent Fury

Jonathan Swift :

  “War! that mad game the world so loves to play. ” 

Remember

Operation Just Cause : Panama

 General William Westmoreland :

             ” War is fear cloaked in courage.”

Remember

Beirut October 23 , 1983

Dwight D. Eisenhower :

   “We are going to have peace even if we have to fight for it.”

Remember

The Gulf War : Operation Desert Storm

 Herbert V. Prochnow :

  “A visitor from Mars could easily pick out the civilized nations.  They have the best implements of war.”

Remember

Sergeant First Class Randall D. Shughart
Citation Reads: Rank and organization: Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army. Place and date: 3 October 1993, Mogadishu, Somalia. Entered service at: —– Born: Newville, Pennsylvania. Citation: Sergeant First Class Shughart, United States Army, distinguished himself by actions above and beyond the call of duty on 3 October 1993, while serving as a Sniper Team Member, United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu, Somalia. Sergeant First Class Shughart provided precision sniper fires from the lead helicopter during an assault on a building and at two helicopter crash sites, while subjected to intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fires. While providing critical suppressive fires at the second crash site, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader learned that ground forces were not immediately available to secure the site. Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader unhesitatingly volunteered to be inserted to protect the four critically wounded personnel, despite being well aware of the growing number of enemy personnel closing in on the site. After their third request to be inserted, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader received permission to perform this volunteer mission. When debris and enemy ground fires at the site caused them to abort the first attempt, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader were inserted one hundred meters south of the crash site. Equipped with only his sniper rifle and a pistol, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader, while under intense small arms fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members. Sergeant First Class Shughart pulled the pilot and the other crew members from the aircraft, establishing a perimeter which placed him and his fellow sniper in the most vulnerable position. Sergeant First Class Shughart used his long range rifle and side arm to kill an undetermined number of attackers while traveling the perimeter, protecting the downed crew. Sergeant First Class Shughart continued his protective fire until he depleted his ammunition and was fatally wounded. His actions saved the pilot’s life. Sergeant First Class Shughart’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest standards of military service and reflect great credit upon him, his unit and the United States Army.
Master Sergeant Gary I. Gordon
Citation Reads: Rank and organization: Master Sergeant, U.S. Army. Place and date: 3 October 1993, Mogadishu, Somalia. Entered service at: —– Born: Lincoln, Maine. Citation: Master Sergeant Gordon, United States Army, distinguished himself by actions above and beyond the call of duty on 3 October 1993, while serving as Sniper Team Leader, United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu, Somalia. Master Sergeant Gordon’s sniper team provided precision fires from the lead helicopter during an assault and at two helicopter crash sites, while subjected to intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fires. When Master Sergeant Gordon learned that ground forces were not immediately available to secure the second crash site, he and another sniper unhesitatingly volunteered to be inserted to protect the four critically wounded personnel, despite being well aware of the growing number of enemy personnel closing in on the site. After his third request to be inserted, Master Sergeant Gordon received permission to perform his volunteer mission. When debris and enemy ground fires at the site caused them to abort the first attempt, Master Sergeant Gordon was inserted one hundred meters south of the crash site. Equipped with only his sniper rifle and a pistol, Master Sergeant Gordon and his fellow sniper, while under intense small arms fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members. Master Sergeant Gordon immediately pulled the pilot and the other crew members from the aircraft, establishing a perimeter which placed him and his fellow sniper in the most vulnerable position. Master Sergeant Gordon used his long range rifle and side arm to kill an undetermined number of attackers until he depleted his ammunition. Master Sergeant Gordon then went back to the wreckage, recovering some of the crew’s weapons and ammunition. Despite the fact that he was critically low on ammunition, he provided some of it to the dazed pilot and then radioed for help. Master Sergeant Gordon continued to travel the perimeter, protecting the downed crew. After his team member was fatally wounded and his own rifle ammunition exhausted, Master Sergeant Gordon returned to the wreckage, recovering a rifle with the last five rounds of ammunition and gave it to the pilot with the words, “good luck.” Then, armed only with his pistol, Master Sergeant Gordon continued to fight until he was fatally wounded. His actions saved the pilot’s life. Master Sergeant Gordon’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest standards of military service and reflect great credit upon, his unit and the United States Army.

Mogadishu , Somalia October 1993

Thomas Jefferson :

  “I recoil with horror at the ferociousness of man.  Will nations never devise a more rational umpire of differences than force?  Are there no means of coercing injustice more gratifying to our nature than a waste of the blood of thousands and of the labor of millions of our fellow creatures?”

Remember

Bosnian Genocide

Dick Motta :

  “War is the only game in which it doesn’t pay to have the home-court advantage.” 

Remember

special forces on horseback

Afganistan

José Narosky :

  “In war, there are no unwounded soldiers.”

Remember

Invasion of Iraq

Henry Fosdick :

  “The tragedy of war is that it uses man’s best to do man’s worst.”  

Remember

All of the terrorist attacks over the past 30 odd years

Remember All Who Were Lost 

  They Were Lost For Us 

    PS: For those of you who have an interest in a conflict I left out please check out this timeline of US Wars created by the Smithsonian Institute . God Bless and please REMEMBER .

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