Tag Archive: New Bern North Carolina


HATTERAS: 100-FOOT MOTORYACHT RISING

 

 

 

 

 

 

” A recent visit to New Bern, NC, home of Pepsi and Hatteras, allowed us to catch up on the construction of its new flagship: the Hatteras 100 RPH.

At one point or another, all companies face this challenge when introducing a new model: How do you strike the right balance between innovation and tradition without losing loyal customers? Hatteras Yachts, which recently designed its flagship and is well into the build of Hull No. One of its new 100-foot raised pilothouse motoryacht, seems to be on the right track.

When we visited in early August, there was much to see of the new flagship, including the elegant composite hull, fresh out of the mold, and a full-size mockup of the lower, main and upper decks, spread out in a rented commercial space close to the shipyard.

Every component of the interior, from the beds to the helm console, coffee tables and lounge chairs on the sun deck, were built to scale in cardboard and plywood. The mockup had the dual purpose of helping the Hatteras design team—under the guidance of Hatteras’ manager of product design, David Brown—come up with the best spatial arrangements and also affords owners the opportunity to give their input while getting a feel for the new motoryacht.  “

 

 

 

 

 

 

LOA: 102ft. (31.09m)
Beam: 22ft. 6in. (6.86m)
Draft: 
5ft.11in. (1.8m)
Hull construction: 
fiberglass
Engines (standard): 
2 x CAT C32 Acerts @ 1,900bhp or 2 x MTU 16V 2000 @ 2,600 bhp
Speed (max.): 
25 to 29 knots
Speed (cruising): 
19 to 24 knots
Fuel capacity: 
4,700 gal. (17,791L)
Freshwater capacity: 
870 gal. (3,293L)
Propellers: 
2 x NiBral high-performance propellers
Exterior design: 
Team for Design by Enrico Gobbi
Overall design direction & interior layout:  
Hatteras Yachts
Interior decor: 
A La Mer
Staterooms: 
Four or Five (with optional ondeck master)
Crew cabins: 
Two
Builder: 
Hatteras Yachts
Delivery: 
Fall 2013

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Not Many Survive So Enjoy The Reminiscences Of One Veteran Who Is Still Around To Tell Of It

 

 

 

” NEW BERN, N.C. — It was probably all over but the dying in late 1944, but no one could convince Germany’s Adolf Hitler of the fact.

In the seas, he was sending orders that virtually turned his once-feared, but now miniscule U-boat fleet into kamikazes; on land, he was pressing a mixture of his best warriors and some untrained teenaged soldiers to make a last great offensive to break the incoming Allied forces before they crossed the Rhine.

He chose to assault the American line along the Ardennes mountains in Belgium because he believed Americans would be the quickest to run. On Dec. 16, a surprise attack opened one of the longest battles of the war (it would last through late January 1945) — a battle that, at times, looked dark for the Yanks.

Its official name was the Ardennes Counteroffensive. But when newspapers ran maps showing the deep curvature of the American battle lines as a result of the offensive, the battle was popularly renamed “The Battle of the Bulge.”

Retired U.S. Army Col. Abbott Weatherly, now 96, remembers the battle well. He was in the thick of it, a young artillery major overseeing a battery with the 113th Field Artillery — a unit raised, in part, from Battery D, National Guard, in New Bern.

Abbott, born in 1916, graduated from the New Bern school system in 1935, when he signed up with the National Guard armory — located then where the New Bern police station is today. “

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