Tag Archive: RFID


The Myth Of The ‘Smart Gun’

 

 

 

” “Biometrics and grip pattern detection can sense the registered owner of a gun and allow only that person to fire it. For example, the iGun, made by Mossberg Group, cannot be fired unless its owner is wearing a ring with a chip that activates the gun,” wrote Nick Bilton for the New York Times.

“But you would be hard pressed to find this technology on many weapons sold in stores.”

There’s a reason for that: because it doesn’t exist. Not yet, anyway, and not without some notable shortcomings. TriggerSmart is another such company, and they’re hoping to have a viable product available in 2014. They’re still in the prototype phase, though, and their product is pretty rough.

Smart guns introduce a layer of complexity that brings along with it several points of failure. They are battery-operated and generally default to safe. They are not water resistant. Biometric scanners require a clean scanner and a clean scan, and cannot be used with gloves. Radio-based scanners can be spoofed or jammed, and because they’re linked to a ring or bracelet, can be used by anyone with access to the key. Both systems are not instantaneous; it takes time for the controller to disengage the safety.

And they just don’t work 100 percent of the time. Which is precisely why both New Jersey and Maryland have enacted legislation that exempts them from being forced to issue smart guns to their police officers. For a target or recreational shooter, this might be OK. But for anyone who may want to use their gun for self-defense, police or otherwise, the failure rate inherent to smart guns—about one percent with the latest generation of smart safeties—is unacceptable. Smart guns aren’t. “

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Originally posted on The Rio Norte Line:

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I keep telling people that nothing happens in our politics today that was not planned in some way. If you are among those who still doubt me, watch this — and remember this was filmed BEFORE these events actually started to happen:

These things were planned, you just have to know how to listen — and what to listen for.  Did you watch to the end?  Did you see the crowd’s reaction to Obama’s heckler?  Do you still wonder why I draw the comparisons between the way people react to Obama and the way they reacted to men such as Mussolini and Hitler?  You shouldn’t: the motivation is exactly the same.  This is a cult of personality, and that seldom ends well.

What this is all about is really very simple to understand: it is about the self-appointed elite controlling EVERYTHING the rest of us do over the course of…

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Remember , The Schools Are Tools Of The Government , Not Of The People 

  ” After a student protested a pilot RFID tracking system in San Antonio, lawyers are now moving to stop expulsion.

John Jay High School sophomore Andrea Hernandez was expelled from her high school after protesting against a new pilot program which tracks the precise location of all attending 4,200 students at Anson Jones Middle School and John Jay High School, according to Infowars.

Under the “Smart ID” program, ID badges have been issued with a tracking chip, which students must wear when attending school. The school badges, worn like a necklace, contain a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chip and links to their social security number. This allows the school to track the student’s location after leaving campus and for as long as the badge is on the student’s person.

The scheme is now in full swing and all students must wear it, according to a letter sent by the school district to the student’s parents and made public. The notice says:

“This “smart” ID card will transmit location information of students to electronic readers which are installed throughout the campus. This is so that we always know where the students are in the building.

After all, parents, you expect school staff to always know where your children are during the school day.” “

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