Tag Archive: Tuna


Women Who Love Fishing, Tackle And Boats

 

 

Tuna:

 

sfgirl-jenn

 

 

 

” Jennifer landed this 120-pound yellowfin tuna off Panama in May 2014. She caught the tuna on a Black Hole Cape Cod special 250g jigging rod and Avet MXL Raptor reel with 65-pound Fins braid. Panama yellowfins can amass so thick around bait schools that it’s possible to motor right into the school and watch tunas fly through the air next to the boat.”

 

 

 

Little Tunny:

 

sfgirl-cynthia

 

” Cynthia landed this nice little tunny on a recent trip. The little tunny is often confused with similar species, mostly because it has different nicknames in different regions and looks like other tunalike fish. Find out the difference between a tuna and a bonito.”

 

 

See the other 23 pictures at SportFishing Mag

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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How Five Skippers Pulled Off Major Tourney Wins

tournament-winners-0000

 

 

 

” What does it take to win a fishing tournament? Perhaps a better question is, what doesn’t it take? The dirty little secret about tournament fishing is that winning requires a lot of everything. While intense preparation usually figures as a major component of any successful team, that doesn’t preclude plain dumb luck as accounting for a winner’s check. Similarly, playing it safe on the water is often the key to success — but then again, the risk-taker is sometimes the one who prevails in the end. And that’s the beauty of tournament fishing: You never know what lies in wait.

Here are a few thoughts from some recent winners of big events and their accounts of just how they did it.”

 

 

 

 

 

10 Of The Greatest Fisheries

canadian-bluefin

” An 857-pound bluefin is maneuvered alongside the boat during the 1949 Tuna Cup in Nova Scotia (top), while Maureen Marazzi caught a 881-pounder in 1971 (lower right); big fish are still caught today in this northerly fishery (bottom left).”

 

 

 

” #1 Canadian Maritimes — Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick

Primary Species: Giant bluefin tuna

Golden Era: 1930 to 1950, 1970s. In the late 1970s, the tuna apparently changed their migration. When the Asian taste for bluefin sushi evolved during the 1980s, prices rose, an industry was born, and Canada prohibited recreational anglers from catching giants. In the past few years, the country has allowed a regulated catch-and-release fishery.

The History: During the late 1800s, harpooners began targeting giants that tangled their herring nets. Through the early 20th century, anglers started pursuing the bluefin, though they were not considered good table fare. Finally, in the 1930s, tackle makers caught up with the fishery, and IGFA founder Michael Lerner helped initiate the International Tuna Cup (Sharp Cup).

Memorable Moment: Bluefin here average 700 pounds, but they get much bigger. The current all-tackle world-record bluefin — a 1,496-pound behemoth — was caught off Nova Scotia in 1979.”


 

 

 

 

 

World’s Top 100 Game Fish

The History of Big Game Fishing

 

Big Game 1896–1978

The “good old times”, great moments of the pioneers – we have always to think about the fact that the Big Gamer hadn´t (useful) mono-lines or fiber-glass-rods until the end of the 50’s. They fished hickory-, bamboo or steel rods -,; the lines were twisted natural fibers (cotton, silk …)

 

 

 

The initial members of the Tuna club of Avalon 1896.







S. Kip Farrington mit 765 lb Blauflossenthun, 9-thread/100 lb Leine, North Carolina, August 1936.


 

 

The 12 Biggest Fish Ever Caught

 

 

tuna, bluefin

 

#5: 1,496-Pound Bluefin Tuna

On October 26, 1979, Ken Fraser caught the record 1,496-pound bluefin tuna. He caught the fish in Aulds Cove off Nova Scotia, Canada, using a mackerel.

New Study Helps Explain Why Tuna and Porpoise Hang Out Together

 

 

 

” For decades, recreational and commercial fishermen have exploited the unique relationship between yellowfin tuna and certain species of porpoise (aka dolphin) in the Eastern Pacific. Schools of yellowfin swim with pods of spotted dolphin and spinner dolphin in the tropics, as well as Pacific common dolphin and white-sided dolphin as far north as Southern California in warmer months. Commercial fishermen look for the dolphin and then wrap up the pod with purse seines to capture the schooling tuna below, sometimes killing dolphin in the process. Recreational fishermen troll lures or put baits in front of the pod to catch yellowfin.

Most anglers, including me, have always believed that the relationship was born out of the search for food, though no one knew if the porpoise were leading the tuna to food or vice versa. However, recently published research indicates that the tuna follow the dolphin, but food is not the primary reason. “

Tuna Fishing In A Kayak

Kona Kayaker Beats Tiger Shark to Boat Big Tuna

 

kayak tuna

 

 

” With all the 400-plus-pound yellowfin tuna in the news these days, a mere 114 ½-pounder doesn’t rank as spectacular in size. But of course everything is relative.
If you’ve paddled out to deep blue depths in a 13 ½-foot piece of plastic, and from that platform hooked and — for more than three hours — fought that 114 ½-pounder, with a big tiger shark hot on its caudal fin, that makes the catch seem a bit more spectacular. “

 

 

 

Beat This One

The Sport Fishing Photo Contest

 

 

 

HOW TO ENTER

1. If you are not a member of our Saltwater Fishing Forums, you need to be. Just register here to become a member.

2. Once you are a member, all you have to do is log in and upload your photos into our Photo Contest Gallery.You must be logged-in to upload photos.

3. If you are having problems, just emailcontest@sportfishingmag.com and we’ll be happy to help.

4. Please upload or have a high-resolution version of your photo available in case you win. Winning photos that do not have a high-resolution version available may not appear in Sport Fishing.

WHAT YOU CAN WIN

Each month, a panel of judges chosen from theSport Fishing editorial staff will pick a First Place winner. That lucky photographer will get a certificate for their choice ofCosta sunglasses!*

Two runner-up photos will also be chosen each month, and these winners will receive a one-year subscription to Sport Fishing magazine!*

Winners will also get a chance to see their photos featured in Sport Fishing magazine (space permitting).

GO TO OUR FORUM PHOTO GALLERIES TO UPLOAD YOUR PHOTOS

The submission period for this month’s contest will end December 31, 2012  First place and runner-up photos will be chosen by Sport Fishing editorial staff by January 15, 2012. See Official Contest Rules here.

*Prize sunglasses and subscriptions are only available to winners that can provide a mailing address in the U.S. or Canada

 

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