Tag Archive: Veteran’s Day


Pete Seeger, Sonny Terry, Brownie McGhee – Down By The Riverside

 

 

 

 

Published on Apr 3, 2013

” Pete Seeger, Sonny Terry, and Brownie McGhee perform “Down by the Riverside” on Pete Seeger’s Rainbow Quest. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Rock Hill Students Hold Guns During Veterans Day Event

 

ROCK HILL GUNS

 

 

” The principal of Saluda Trail Middle School in Rock Hill is defending the decision to let students hold military weapons during a Veterans Day program at the school last week.

A parent complained after pictures of two students holding weapons were posted on the eighth grade school blog.

In each picture a member of the military is next to the student.

The parent thought, that in light of recent school shootings, it was inappropriate.

Principal Brenda Campbell disagreed.

“Those guns are completely no ammo. They had been checked out by the military themselves, who brought them into our school,” Campbell said.”

 

Kudos to Principal Campbell for standing her ground .

 

 

 

 

 

A Repost From Last Year For Our Veterans

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWD4Oy6fKlo&feature=youtube_gdata_player

We are proud to present a classic Armistice Day tribute from Mark Steyn

 

 

 

  ” This Remembrance Day/Veterans Day piece from the first November 11th after September 11th is anthologized in The Face Of The TigerAnd don’t forget Monique Fauteux’s and my live performance of the greatest of songs from the Great War, “Roses Of Picardy“, in a special Song of the Week audio edition.

On CNN the other day, Larry King asked Tony Blair what it was he had in his buttonhole. It was a poppy — not a real poppy, but a stylized, mass-produced thing of red paper and green plastic that, as the Prime Minister explained, is worn in Britain and other Commonwealth countries in the days before November 11th. They’re sold in the street by aged members of the Royal British Legion to commemorate that moment 83 years ago today, when on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month the guns fell silent on the battlefields of Europe.

The poppy is an indelible image of that “war to end all wars”, summoned up by a Canadian, Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae, in a poem written in the trenches in May 1915:

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

Row on row on row.

And, in between, thousands of poppies, for they bloom in uprooted soil. Sacrifice on the scale McCrae witnessed is all but unimaginable in the west today — in Canada, in Britain, even apparently in America, which instead of sending in the cavalry is now dropping horse feed for the Northern Alliance, in the hope they might rouse themselves to seize an abandoned village or two, weather permitting.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank You Veterans , God Bless You

 

 

Uploaded on Nov 16, 2010

” This is a video I did to honor and thank all United States military personnel, past and present, for the selfless sacrifices they make to keep our nation free. It was used for our church’s annual Veterans Day Celebration on November 14, 2010.

I’m paying special honor to my grandfather, RICHARD A. PESTKE, who was a photographer in the US Navy during WWII. His picture is at the 2:20 mark of the video.

PLEASE, NO PROFANITY IN COMMENTS! I want this video to be something families and children can view without offense. If you use profanity your comments will be removed. If it continues I may shut off the ability to leave comments. I don’t want to do that, so PLEASE don’t use profanity. It’s not necessary. Thank you!

One last thing. I’m sorry for the random “flickering” on the video. You can thank Microsoft for making such a poor software program called “Windows Movie Maker.” I won’t be using it again for any more major projects. Now I know why most graphics experts like using Macs.

All images were taken from Google images and the sound effects from YouTube or sounddogs.com. A special “thank you” to Mr. Dustin Evans for the use of his song “If I Die Before You Wake.” “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II’s Surviving Doolittle Raiders Make Final Toast

 

 

” Known as the Doolittle Raiders, the 80 men who risked their lives on a World War II bombing mission on Japan after the attack on Pearl Harbor were toasted one last time by their surviving comrades and honored with a Veterans Day weekend of fanfare shared by thousands.’

 

 

 

 

” Three of the four surviving Raiders attended the toast Saturday at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. Their late commander, Lt. Gen. James “Jimmy” Doolittle, started the tradition but they decided this autumn’s ceremony would be their last.”

 

 

 

 

” “May they rest in peace,” Lt. Col. Richard Cole, 98, said before he and fellow Raiders — Lt. Col. Edward Saylor, 93, and Staff Sgt. David Thatcher, 92 — sipped cognac from specially engraved silver goblets. The 1896 cognac was saved for the occasion after being passed down from Doolittle.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

School Removed God Reference From first-Grader’s Poem

 

 

 

 

 

” An elementary school in North Carolina censored a first-grade student’s Veterans Day poem by removing a line that referenced her grandfather’s belief in God.

The West Marion Elementary School student was supposed to read the poem at a Nov. 8 Veterans Day ceremony to honor her grandfather, a Vietnam veteran.

The deleted line read: “He prayed to God for peace, he prayed to God for strength.”

An attorney for the Alliance Defending Freedom, which advocates for religious rights and freedoms, criticized the school’s decision. “

The Federalist Papers

 

 

Illustration Courtesy of US War Dogs Association 

We see honors bestowed in the military communities, but how well do you know what they mean?

 

 

 

  ” U.S. Military salutes can wrench emotion from one’s soul. Who can hold back a tear when shots echo through the countryside at a funeral, or not be overwhelmed with pride when the big guns on a ship roar across the seas?

 

These salutes are steeped in military tradition, some dating back hundreds of years. But, there are many misconceptions about military salutes. This is understandable, though, considering the number of salutes for various occasions. Some have even changed over the years, sometimes through acts of Congress. All of them, however, are intended to demonstrate great honor to those for whom they are conducted. This includes fallen members of the military, presidents, heads of state and even the nation.

 

 

Three Volley Salute

One misconception is calling the shots fired at a military funeral a 21-gun salute. Even if there are seven soldiers firing three rounds each, this is not a 21-gun salute, because the soldiers aren’t using guns, they’re using rifles. In the military, guns are considered artillery. Instead, the shots fired during a military funeral are called the firing of three volleys in honor of the fallen.

 

The firing of three volleys dates back to the custom of ceasing hostilities to remove the dead from the battlefield. Once finished, both sides would fire three volleys to signal that they were ready to resume the battle. “

Mark Steyn

 

 

  ” This Remembrance Day/Veterans Day piece from the first November 11th after September 11th is anthologized in The Face Of The TigerAnd don’t forget Monique Fauteux’s and my live performance of the greatest of songs from the Great War, “Roses Of Picardy“, in a special Song of the Week audio edition.

 

On CNN the other day, Larry King asked Tony Blair what it was he had in his buttonhole. It was a poppy — not a real poppy, but a stylized, mass-produced thing of red paper and green plastic that, as the Prime Minister explained, is worn in Britain and other Commonwealth countries in the days before November 11th. They’re sold in the street by aged members of the Royal British Legion to commemorate that moment 83 years ago today, when on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month the guns fell silent on the battlefields of Europe.

The poppy is an indelible image of that “war to end all wars”, summoned up by a Canadian, Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae, in a poem written in the trenches in May 1915:

 

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

Row on row on row.

 

And, in between, thousands of poppies, for they bloom in uprooted soil. Sacrifice on the scale McCrae witnessed is all but unimaginable in the west today — in Canada, in Britain, even apparently in America, which instead of sending in the cavalry is now dropping horse feed for the Northern Alliance, in the hope they might rouse themselves to seize an abandoned village or two, weather permitting.”

 Armistice Day

 

 

 

  ” Five times I have trod the battlefields of France from that long ago first global conflict. Three times I have led others across them, explaining what happened where. And one stop that I never fail to make while over there is to the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery at Romagne-sous-Montfaucon, the largest cemetery of American war dead in Europe, with 14,246 graves; all from the First World War. And each time I bring pilgrims with me to the site, I remind them this: the war cemeteries in Europe are not like veteran’s cemeteries back home. While both are filled with men who served and defended our beliefs, the ones back home contain men who also built the way of life that we enjoy today. They raised families and helped others to; started business’s and built industry; created marvelous inventions and intellectual properties; dug the ditches and prevailed over the board rooms; built the Cadillac’s and drove the Cadillac’s; they farmed, and banked, and trucked, and bought and sold, and raised our standard of living to the highest in the world. They came home and lived.

 

The men who lie in France did not.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special Deals Around The Nation 

 

 

Military Veterans Gain Free Admission Veterans to National Parks

Military veterans are offered free admission to all national parks during certain designated days each year.  They include:

 

  • January 14-16
    Martin Luther King, Jr. weekend

 

  • April 21-29
    National Park Week

  • June 9
    Get Outdoors Day

 

 

  • November 10-12
    Veterans Day weekend

 

The annual pass is available free to active duty military members and their dependents. For more information on this deal, please click here.

 Expiration: Dec 31, 2012

*This deal requires valid military ID in order to redeem*

Category: Sports & Recreation

View Deal Details
 
 
 

Lots More At The Link 

November 11 , 2012

History of Veterans Day

  ” World War I – known at the time as “The Great War” – officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of “the war to end all wars.”

Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry near a church at Stenay, Meuse in France.

Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry near a church at Stenay, Meuse in France, wait for the end of hostilities.  This photo was taken at 10:58 a.m., on November 11, 1918, two minutes before the armistice ending World War I went into effect

In Flanders Fields
John McCrae, 1915.

 In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields. 

“And all this madness, all this rage, all this flaming death of our civilization and our hopes, has been brought about because a set of official gentlemen, living luxurious lives, mostly stupid, and all without imagination or heart, have chosen that it should occur rather than that any one of them should suffer some infinitesimal rebuff to his country`s pride.”


 Bertrand Russell, 1914

“We were not making war against Germany, we were being ordered about in the King’s war with Germany.” 

H.G. Wells

Verdun

Remembering Belleau Wood

‘Retreat? Hell, we just got here!’ 

US Marine Captain Lloyd W. Williams

Tommy

I went into a public-'ouse to get a pint o' beer,
The publican 'e up an' sez, "We serve no red-coats here."
The girls be'ind the bar they laughed an' giggled fit to die,
I outs into the street again an' to myself sez I:
    O it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, go away";
    But it's "Thank you, Mister Atkins", when the band begins to play,
    The band begins to play, my boys, the band begins to play,
    O it's "Thank you, Mister Atkins", when the band begins to play.

I went into a theatre as sober as could be,
They gave a drunk civilian room, but 'adn't none for me;
They sent me to the gallery or round the music-'alls,
But when it comes to fightin', Lord! they'll shove me in the stalls!
    For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, wait outside";
    But it's "Special train for Atkins" when the trooper's on the tide,
    The troopship's on the tide, my boys, the troopship's on the tide,
    O it's "Special train for Atkins" when the trooper's on the tide.

Yes, makin' mock o' uniforms that guard you while you sleep
Is cheaper than them uniforms, an' they're starvation cheap;
An' hustlin' drunken soldiers when they're goin' large a bit
Is five times better business than paradin' in full kit.
    Then it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, 'ow's yer soul?"
    But it's "Thin red line of 'eroes" when the drums begin to roll,
    The drums begin to roll, my boys, the drums begin to roll,
    O it's "Thin red line of 'eroes" when the drums begin to roll.

We aren't no thin red 'eroes, nor we aren't no blackguards too,
But single men in barricks, most remarkable like you;
An' if sometimes our conduck isn't all your fancy paints,
Why, single men in barricks don't grow into plaster saints;
    While it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, fall be'ind",
    But it's "Please to walk in front, sir", when there's trouble in the wind,
    There's trouble in the wind, my boys, there's trouble in the wind,
    O it's "Please to walk in front, sir", when there's trouble in the wind.

You talk o' better food for us, an' schools, an' fires, an' all:
We'll wait for extry rations if you treat us rational.
Don't mess about the cook-room slops, but prove it to our face
The Widow's Uniform is not the soldier-man's disgrace.
    For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Chuck him out, the brute!"
    But it's "Saviour of 'is country" when the guns begin to shoot;
    An' it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' anything you please;
    An' Tommy ain't a bloomin' fool -- you bet that Tommy sees!

The Somme

‘This is not peace, it is an armistice for 20 years.’ 

Ferdinand Foch
After the Treaty of Versailles, 1919

Thank You Veterans 

We Will Never Forget

   Mike Lester

 

 

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