Tag Archive: Video


Siegel – Schwall Band – “The Blues Is Alright”

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on May 30, 2009

” SAMBO ARTHUR IRBY takes lead vocals on this one.CORKY SIEGEL- Harmonica/Piano/Vocals. JIM SCHWALL – Guitar/Vocals, The “Legendary” SAM LAY – Drums/Vocals, ROLLO RADFORD – Bass/Vocals, SAMBO ARTHUR IRBY- Percussion’s, Drums, Vocals”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday Fats Waller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” Not only was Fats Waller one of the greatest pianists jazz has ever known, he was also one of its most exuberantly funny entertainers — and as so often happens, one facet tends to obscure the other. His extraordinarily light and flexible touch belied his ample physical girth; he could swing as hard as any pianist alive or dead in his classic James P. Johnson-derived stride manner, with a powerful left hand delivering the octaves and tenths in a tireless, rapid, seamless stream. Waller also pioneered the use of the pipe organ and Hammond organ in jazz — he called the pipe organ the “God box” — adapting his irresistible sense of swing to the pedals and a staccato right hand while making imaginative changes of the registration. As a composer and improviser, his melodic invention rarely flagged, and he contributed fistfuls of joyous yet paradoxically winsome songs like “Honeysuckle Rose,” “Ain’t Misbehavin,'” “Keepin’ Out of Mischief Now,” “Blue Turning Grey Over You” and the extraordinary “Jitterbug Waltz” to the jazz repertoire.

  During his lifetime and afterwards, though, Fats Waller was best known to the world for his outsized comic personality and sly vocals, where he would send up trashy tunes that Victor Records made him record with his nifty combo, Fats Waller & His Rhythm. Yet on virtually any of his records, whether the song is an evergreen standard or the most trite bit of doggerel that a Tin Pan Alley hack could serve up, you will hear a winning combination of good knockabout humor, foot-tapping rhythm and fantastic piano playing. Today, almost all of Fats Waller‘s studio recordings can be found on RCA’s on-again-off-again series The Complete Fats Waller, which commenced on LPs in 1975 and was still in progress during the 1990s.” Continue reading

Discography

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Newport Folk Festival

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Aug 29, 2010

” Some rare footage of two great Mississippi blues men, the fiery slide of Fred McDowell and the sweet and mellow John Hurt with his beautiful finger picking style, only glimpses that leave you wanting a whole lot more. Plus some of the young white guys who were making great music at the time, John Koerner and the Paul Butterfield band with Paul on harp and Mike Bloomfield on guitar.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday Jimmy Thackery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” Singer, songwriter, and guitar virtuoso Jimmy Thackery carved an enviable niche for himself in the world of electric blues. Known for his gritty, blue-collar approach and marathon live shows, Thackery was for many years part of the Nighthawks, one of the hardest-working blues bar bands in North America. By the late ’80s, he was touring and recording under his own name, and finding widespread acceptance on the festival circuit. His hard-edged, tough-as-nails approach to guitar playing and his trio’s driving rhythm section holds appeal for fans of both the straight-ahead blues of Muddy Waters and the roots rock of Bruce Springsteen and Joe Grushecky. Like the Nighthawks and Grushecky‘s Houserockers, much of the material Thackery performs can safely be called blues or blues-rock. Hardcore blues like “It’s My Own Fault” and popular blues-rock chestnuts like “Red House” from Jimi Hendrix are fair game for Thackery & His Drivers, which included Michael Patrick on bass and Mark Stutso on drums and vocals.

  Born in Pittsburgh, Thackery was raised in Washington, D.C. In high school, he played in a band with Bonnie Raitt‘s brother, David, who exposed him to the music of Buddy Guy; Thackery saw both Guy and Jimi Hendrix perform in Washington, D.C. Thackery joined the Nighthawks in 1974, after being introduced to harmonica man Mark Wenner by fellow guitarist Bobby Radcliff, who was then based in D.C. Thackery recorded more than 20 albums with the Nighthawks and toured the U.S., Canada, Europe, and Japan. He left the band in 1987 and struck out on his own, needing a break from the Nighthawks‘ 300-nights-a-year tour schedule. ” Continue reading

Discography

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Happy Birthday Big Joe Turner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” The premier blues shouter of the postwar era, Big Joe Turner‘s roar could rattle the very foundation of any gin joint he sang within — and that’s without a microphone. Turner was a resilient figure in the history of blues — he effortlessly spanned boogie-woogie, jump blues, even the first wave of rock & roll, enjoying great success in each genre.

  Turner, whose powerful physique certainly matched his vocal might, was a product of the swinging, wide-open Kansas City scene. Even in his teens, the big-boned Turner looked entirely mature enough to gain entry to various K.C. nighteries. He ended up simultaneously tending bar and singing the blues before hooking up with boogie piano master Pete Johnson during the early ’30s. Theirs was a partnership that would endure for 13 years.

  The pair initially traveled to New York at John Hammond‘s behest in 1936. On December 23, 1938, they appeared on the fabled Spirituals to Swing concert at Carnegie Hall on a bill with Big Bill Broonzy,Sonny Terry, the Golden Gate Quartet, and Count Basie. Turner and Johnson performed “Low Down Dog” and “It’s All Right, Baby” on the historic show, kicking off a boogie-woogie craze that landed them a long-running slot at the Cafe Society (along with piano giants Meade Lux Lewis and Albert Ammons).

  As 1938 came to a close, Turner and Johnson waxed the thundering “Roll ‘Em Pete” for Vocalion. It was a thrilling up-tempo number anchored by Johnson‘s crashing 88s, and Turner would re-record it many times over the decades. Turner and Johnson waxed their seminal blues “Cherry Red” the next year for Vocalion with trumpeter Hot Lips Page and a full combo in support. In 1940, the massive shouter moved over to Decca and cut “Piney Brown Blues” with Johnson rippling the ivories. But not all of Turner‘s Decca sides teamed him with Johnson; Willie “The Lion” Smith accompanied him on the mournful “Careless Love,” while Freddie Slack’s Trio provided backing for “Rocks in My Bed” in 1941.

  Turner ventured out to the West Coast during the war years, building quite a following while ensconced on the L.A. circuit. In 1945, he signed on with National Records and cut some fine small combo platters under Herb Abramson‘s supervision. Turner remained with National through 1947, belting an exuberant “My Gal’s a Jockey” that became his first national R&B smash. Contracts didn’t stop him from waxing an incredibly risqué two-part “Around the Clock” for the aptly named Stag imprint (as Big Vernon!) in 1947. There were also solid sessions for Aladdin that year that included a wild vocal duel with one of Turner‘s principal rivals, Wynonie Harris, on the ribald two-part “Battle of the Blues.” ” Continue reading

Discography

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Happy Birthday Taj Mahal

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” One of the most prominent figures in late 20th century blues, singer/multi-instrumentalist Taj Mahal played an enormous role in revitalizing and preserving traditional acoustic blues. Not content to stay within that realm, Mahal soon broadened his approach, taking a musicologist’s interest in a multitude of folk and roots music from around the world — reggae and other Caribbean folk, jazz, gospel, R&B, zydeco, various West African styles, Latin, even Hawaiian. The African-derived heritage of most of those forms allowed Mahal to explore his own ethnicity from a global perspective and to present the blues as part of a wider musical context. Yet while he dabbled in many different genres, he never strayed too far from his laid-back country blues foundation. Blues purists naturally didn’t have much use for Mahal‘s music, and according to some of his other detractors, his multi-ethnic fusions sometimes came off as indulgent, or overly self-conscious and academic. Still, Mahal‘s concept was vindicated in the ’90s, when a cadre of young bluesmen began to follow his lead — both acoustic revivalists (Keb’ Mo’, Guy Davis) and eclectic bohemians (Corey Harris, Alvin Youngblood Hart).

  Taj Mahal was born Henry St. Clair Fredericks in New York on May 17, 1942. His parents — his father a jazz pianist/composer/arranger of Jamaican descent, his mother a schoolteacher from South Carolina who sang gospel — moved to Springfield, Massachusetts, when he was quite young, and while growing up there, he often listened to music from around the world on his father’s short-wave radio Bo Diddley. While studying agriculture and animal husbandry at the University of Massachusetts, he adopted the musical alias Taj Mahal (an idea that came to him in a dream) and formed Taj Mahal & the Elektras, who played around the area during the early ’60s. After graduating, Mahal moved to Los Angeles in 1964 and, after making his name on the local folk-blues scene, formed the Rising Sons with guitarist Ry Cooder. The group signed to Columbia and released one single, but the label didn’t quite know what to make of their forward-looking blend of Americana, which anticipated a number of roots rock fusions that would take shape in the next few years; as such, the album they recorded sat on the shelves, unreleased until 1992.” Continue reading 

Discography

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Lightnin’ Hopkins – Mr Charlie Your Rollin’ Mill Is Burnin’ Down

 

 

 

 

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Terry ” Harmonica ” Bean – Of Delta Mississippi Blues – With the Blues Band

 

 

 

 

Published on Mar 17, 2012

” Terry ” Harmonica ” Bean in live – Mike Jay Greene (guitare), Fred Jouglas (basse) et Simon “Shuffle” Boyer (batterie). @ l’Espace le Bois aux Dames Samoëns Haute Savoie France le Vendredi 16 Mars 2012 “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jeff Beck With Eric Clapton And A Roy Buchanan Song- 2 Of The Most Beautiful Songs In The World

 

 

 

 

Published on Jan 3, 2015

” I like Clapton’s opening comment at 0:12 “If there was a coin we could be like,you know,I could be on one side and he could be on the other”. Jeff Beck should have the words “Talent Scout” in his resume because he knew great talent when he saw it, heard it or performed with them. Les Paul,Cliff Gallup,B.B. King,Bo Diddley,Scotty Moore,Little Richard,Jerry Lee Lewis,Chuck Berry,Matt Murphy Paul Burlison,Buddy Guy,Earl Hooker,James Burton,Steve Cropper,Hank Marvin,Ian Stewart,Hendrix,Clapton,Page,Townsend,Ro­d Stewart,Ron Wood,Billy Gibbons,John McLaughlin,Stevie Wonder,Stanley Clarke,Jan Hammer,Carlos Santana,David Gilmour,Roger Waters,Aynsley Dunbar,Cozy Powell,Jack Bruce,Tim Bogert,Carmine Appice,Buddy Miles,Paul McCartney are just a few of many more to add.
The opening song “Cause We’ve Ended as Lovers” was written by Stevie Wonder and was voted the number 1 most beautiful instrumental of All Time. Jeff dedicated that song to Roy Buchanan on his landmark 1975 LP “Blow by Blow”. Since it was Jeff Beck who turned me onto Roy Buchanan’s music (I have almost every recording by him starting back from 1957) so I felt that I had to add,what I think is, Roy’s most beautiful song as a follow up. This Roy Buchanan song is an instrumental version of “The Messiah Will Come Again” recorded live in Chicago around 1985. Roy was known as “The World’s Greatest Unknown Guitarist” and there is a great book about him titled “American Axe”http://www.amazon.com/Roy-Buchanan-Am…
Buy it if you want to learn more about this great guitarist.
Jeff Beck http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Beck
Jeff Beck Discography http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Bec…
Blow by Blow LP http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blow_by_…
Roy Buchanan http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Buch…
Roy Buchanan’s first lp from 1972 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Buch…)
Back issues of Jeff Beck Bulletins http://www.ainian.com/backbull.html
0:00 Nice intro by Clapton
0:34 Cause We’ve Ended As Lovers
2:54 Eric Clapton lets loose
3:30 Doyle Bramhall II solo
4:02 Jeff Beck’s solo
Nathan East-Bass http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathan_East
Steve Gadd-Drums http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Gadd
6:13 The Messiah Will Come Again (I love how this song starts off slow then by the end it’s smoking hot. I once listened to this song 13 times in a row and it still gives me the goose bumps when ever I hear those pinched harmonics and Flash Guitar runs.
Here is a link to one of my favorite Roy Buchanan songs called “When A Guitar Plays The Blues” at Carnegie Hall in NYC https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ka7yH…
And here is another link of Roy performing “Green Onions” and “Short Fuse” at Carnegie Hall in NYC 1985https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNW-5… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sister Rosetta Tharpe – Documentary 2011

 

 

 

 

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Jimi Hendrix – 12 String Blues

 

 

 

 

Published on Nov 2, 2012

” Mr. Jimi Hendrix with his 12 string acoustic guitar. Filmed in widescreen. A very clear image of Jimi and his guitar work.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Howlin’ Wolf Story

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published on Jul 9, 2014

” The Howlin ‘Wolf Story – The Secret History of Rock & Roll

Documentary about Chester A. Burnett, better known as Howlin’ Wolf
Rare footage of Howlin’ Wolf presented by the Rolling Stones on Shindig performing “How Many More Years?
First presentation of previously unknown or unavailable performance footage,
Drummer Sam Lay’s rare, never-before-seen home movies of stars of the Chicago Blues clubs from the early ’60s,
Newly discovered photos of Howlin’ Wolf and his band,
First filmed interview with Howlin’ Wolf’s family.

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976,
allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism,
comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship,and research.
Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.
Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Bob ” Steady Rollin’ ” Margolin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” With each new album, guitarist, singer, and songwriter “Steady Rollin'” Bob Margolin continues to expand the boundaries of modern blues. Margolin, a sideman for Muddy Waters from 1973 to 1980, was born on May 9, 1949, and raised in Brookline, MA, became enamored with the recordings of Chuck Berry while still in high school and began playing out a few years later while attending Boston University in the early ’70s. Working with a variety of Boston-area blues bands and one he called the Boston Blues Band, he elected to pursue music full-time. In 1973, he joined Waters on the road and in the studio for seven years, playing festivals and clubs around the U.S., Canada, and Europe with the legendary bluesman, who died in 1983. Highlights of his career with Waters‘ band included the taping for The Last Waltz on Thanksgiving Day 1976, and performing at the White House for Jimmy Carter in August 1978.” Continue Reading

Discography

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Happy Birthday Robert Johnson & Joe Bonamassa

 

 

Mr Johnson:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” If the blues has a truly mythic figure, one whose story hangs over the music the way a Charlie Parker does over jazz or a Hank Williams does over country, it’s Robert Johnson, certainly the most celebrated figure in the history of the blues. Of course, his legend is immensely fortified by the fact that Johnson also left behind a small legacy of recordings that are considered the emotional apex of the music itself. These recordings have not only entered the realm of blues standards (“Love in Vain,” “Crossroads,” “Sweet Home Chicago,” “Stop Breaking Down”), but were adapted by rock & roll artists as diverse as the Rolling Stones, Steve Miller, Led Zeppelin, and Eric Clapton. While there are historical naysayers who would be more comfortable downplaying his skills and achievements (most of whom have never made a convincing case as where the source of his apocalyptic visions emanates from), Robert Johnson remains a potent force to be reckoned with. As a singer, a composer, and as a guitarist of considerable skills, he produced some of the genre’s best music and the ultimate blues legend to deal with. Doomed, haunted, driven by demons, a tormented genius dead at an early age, all of these add up to making him a character of mythology who — if he hadn’t actually existed — would have to be created by some biographer’s overactive romantic imagination.

  The legend of his life — which by now, even folks who don’t know anything about the blues can cite to you chapter and verse — goes something like this: Robert Johnson was a young black man living on a plantation in rural Mississippi. Branded with a burning desire to become great blues musician, he was instructed to take his guitar to a crossroad near Dockery’s plantation at midnight. There he was met by a large black man (the Devil) who took the guitar from Johnson, tuned it, and handed it back to him. Within less than a year’s time, in exchange for his everlasting soul, Robert Johnson became the king of the Delta blues singers, able to play, sing, and create the greatest blues anyone had ever heard.” Continue reading

Discography

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Joe Bonamassa:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” Guitar mastermind Joe Bonamassa, a young player with the childhood dream of playing music similar to legends like Stevie Ray Vaughan, Eric Clapton, and Jimi Hendrix, was 22 when he inked a deal with Epic. Hailing from Utica, New York, Bonamassa could play the blues before he could drive a car. He first heard Stevie Ray Vaughan at age four and was instantly taken by Vaughan‘s high-powered playing. At age eight, he opened for B.B. King, and at age 12, he was playing regularly around upstate New York. It was soon thereafter that Bonamassa hooked up with the band Bloodline, which featured other musicians’ sons: Waylon Krieger (Robby Krieger‘s son), Erin Davis (Miles Davis‘ drummer kid), and Berry Oakley, Jr. (son of the Allman Brothers bassist). Bloodline released a self-titled album, but Bonamassa wanted to move on. In summer 2000 he guested for Roger McGuinn on Jethro Tull‘s summer tour, later releasing his debut solo album, A New Day Yesterday. Produced by longtime fan Tom Dowd, the album marked a move toward a more organic and rock-sounding direction. He put together a power trio with drummer Kenny Kramme and bassist Eric Czar and hit the road to support the album.” Continue Reading

Discography

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Big Bill Broonzy 1957

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Jan 21, 2010

” The great country blues singer and guitarist Big Bill Broonzy performs “Worried Man Blues,” “Hey, Hey” and “How You Want It Done.” From the DVD “A Musical Journey: The Films of Pete, Toshi and Dan Seeger.” More info at http://www.guitarvideos.com/products/… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Blues Brothers – Full Concert – 12.31.78 – Winterland

 

 

Published on Nov 4, 2014

” The Blues Brothers – Full Concert
Recorded Live: 12/31/1978 – Winterland (San Francisco, CA)

More The Blues Brothers at Music Vault: http://www.musicvault.com
Subscribe to Music Vault: http://goo.gl/DUzpUF

Setlist:
0:00:00 – Can’t Turn You Loose (Intro)
0:01:49 – Hey Bartender
0:04:44 – Messin’ With The Kid
0:08:06 – (I Got Everything I Need) Almost
0:11:27 – Rubber Biscuit
0:14:55 – Shotgun Blues
0:20:40 – Groove Me
0:24:26 – I Don’t Know
0:29:57 – Soul Man
0:33:04 – B Movie Box Car Blues
0:38:44 – Flip, Flop & Fly
0:42:41 – Jailhouse Rock

Personnel:
Joliet Jake Blues (John Belushi) – vocals
Elwood Blues (Dan Akroyd) – harmonica, vocals
Steve Cropper – guitar
Matt Murphy – guitar
Donald Dunn – bass
Tom Malone – trombone, trumpet, saxophone
Lou Marini – saxophone
Tom Scott – saxophone
Alan Rubin – trumpet
Paul Shaffer – keyboards
Murphy Dunne – piano
Steve Jordan – drums
Willie Hall – drums “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday “Blind” Willie McTell

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Willie Samuel McTell was one of the blues’ greatest guitarists, and also one of the finest singers ever to work in blues. A major figure with a local following in Atlanta from the 1920s onward, he recorded dozens of sides throughout the ’30s under a multitude of names — all the better to juggle “exclusive” relationships with many different record labels at once — including Blind Willie, Blind Sammie, Hot Shot Willie, and Georgia Bill, as a backup musician to Ruth Mary Willis. And those may not have been all of his pseudonyms — we don’t even know what he chose to call himself, although “Blind Willie” was his preferred choice among friends. Much of what we do know about him was learned only years after his death, from family members and acquaintances. His family name was, so far as we know, McTier or McTear, and the origins of the “McTell” name are unclear. What is clear is that he was born into a family filled with musicians — his mother and his father both played guitar, as did one of his uncles, and he was also related to Georgia Tom Dorsey, who later became the Rev. Thomas Dorsey.

  McTell was born in Thomson, Georgia, near Augusta, and raised near Statesboro. He was probably born blind, although early in his life he could perceive light in one eye. His blindness never became a major impediment, however, and it was said that his sense of hearing and touch were extraordinary. His first instruments were the harmonica and the accordion, but as soon as he was big enough he took up the guitar and showed immediate aptitude on the new instrument. He played a standard six-string acoustic until the mid-’20s, and never entirely abandoned the instrument, but from the beginning of his recording career, he used a 12-string acoustic in the studio almost exclusively. McTell‘s technique on the 12-string instrument was unique. Unlike virtually every other bluesman who used one, he relied not on its resonances as a rhythm instrument, but, instead, displayed a nimble, elegant slide and finger-picking style that made it sound like more than one guitar at any given moment. He studied at a number of schools for the blind, in Georgia, New York, and Michigan, during the early ’20s, and probably picked up some formal musical knowledge. He worked medicine shows, carnivals, and other outdoor venues, and was a popular attraction, owing to his sheer dexterity and a nasal singing voice that could sound either pleasant or mournful, and incorporated some of the characteristics normally associated with white hillbilly singers.” Continue reading

 

 

 

Discography

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Lightnin’ Slim & Whispering Smith – Live 1972

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Dec 7, 2011

” From the American Folk Blues Festival 1972, live in Paris… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Yardbirds – Jeff Beck – Jimmy Page -Train Kept A Rollin’

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Feb 25, 2011

” Great Yardbirds clip with Page and a pissed off Beck! This beats the piss outta Duckface! “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American Folk Blues Festival 1962 – 1969 Vol 3

 

 

 

 

Published on Aug 1, 2013

” Tracks: Hound Dog (Big Mama Thornton), Gulfport Boogie (Roosevelt Sykes), Out of Sight (Buddy Guy), Feel So Good (Dr. Isaiah Ross), Flip, Flop & Fly (Joe Turner), All Night Long (Skip James), Crow Jane (Skip James), Got Sick & Tired (Bukka White), Death Letter Blues (Son House), Wild About You (Hound Dog Taylor), Wang Dang Doodle (Koko Taylor), Stranger Blues, Burnt Child (Afraid of Fire), Move Across the River (Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee), The Blues Ain’t Nothin’ But a Woman (Helen Humes) “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday Little Walter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be sure to read our birthday tribute to Mr Jacobs here 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Otis Rush

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Breaking into the R&B Top Ten his very first time out in 1956 with the startlingly intense slow blues “I Can’t Quit You Baby,” southpaw guitarist Otis Rush subsequently established himself as one of the premier bluesmen on the Chicago circuit. Rush is often credited with being one of the architects of the West side guitar style, along with Magic Sam and Buddy Guy. It’s a nebulous honor, since Rush played clubs on Chicago’s South side just as frequently during the sound’s late-’50s incubation period. Nevertheless, his esteemed status as a prime Chicago innovator is eternally assured by the ringing, vibrato-enhanced guitar work that remains his stock in trade and a tortured, super-intense vocal delivery that can force the hairs on the back of your neck upwards in silent salute. If talent alone were the formula for widespread success, Rush would certainly have been Chicago’s leading blues artist. But fate, luck, and the guitarist’s own idiosyncrasies conspired to hold him back on several occasions when opportunity was virtually begging to be accepted.

” Rush came to Chicago in 1948, met Muddy Waters, and knew instantly what he wanted to do with the rest of his life. The omnipresent Willie Dixon caught Rush‘s act and signed him to Eli Toscano‘s Cobra Records in 1956. The frighteningly intense “I Can’t Quit You Baby” was the maiden effort for both artist and label, streaking to number six on Billboard’s R&B chart. His 1956-1958 Cobra legacy is a magnificent one, distinguished by the Dixon-produced minor-key masterpieces “Double Trouble” and “My Love Will Never Die,” the tough-as-nails “Three Times a Fool” and “Keep on Loving Me Baby,” and the rhumba-rocking classic “All Your Love (I Miss Loving).” Rush apparently dashed off the latter tune in the car en route to Cobra’s West Roosevelt Road studios, where he would cut it with the nucleus of Ike Turner‘s combo.

  After Cobra closed up shop, Rush‘s recording fortunes mostly floundered. He followed Dixon over to Chess in 1960, cutting another classic (the stunning “So Many Roads, So Many Trains”) before moving on to Duke (one solitary single, 1962’s “Homework”), Vanguard, and Cotillion (there he cut the underrated Mike BloomfieldNick Gravenites-produced 1969 album Mourning in the Morning, with yeoman help from the house rhythm section in Muscle Shoals). Typical of Rush‘s horrendous luck was the unnerving saga of his Right Place, Wrong Time album.”Continue reading

 

 

 

 

Discography

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Howlin’ Wolf – How Many More Years

 

 

 

 

Published on Oct 10, 2012

” lyrics:
How many more years, have I got to let you dog me around
How many more years, have I got to let you dog me around
I’d soon rather be dead, sleeping six feet in the ground
I’m gonna fall on my knees, I’m gonna raise up my right hand
I’m gonna fall on my knees, I’m gonna raise up my right hand
Say I’d feel much better darling, if you’d just only understand
I’m going upstairs, I’m gonna bring back down my clothes
I’m going upstairs, I’m gonna bring back down my clothes, do them all
If anybody ask about me, just tell’em I walked out on”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bill Evans & Robben Ford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published on Mar 20, 2013

” Copyrights: BMG Rights Management
Bill Evans & Robben Ford – Soulgrass meets Blues, Miles & Beyond
(Estival Jazz Lugano 2010)
1. Lateral Climb
2. Cool Eddie
3. Don’t Worry ’bout Me
4. Oasis
5. Celtic Junction
6. Don’t Let The Sun Catch You Crying
7. Sweet Tea
8. Supernatural
9. Ode To The Working Man
10. Spoonful
Robben Ford – guitar
Bill Evans – saxophone
Etienne Mbappe – bass
Ryan Cavanaugh – banjo
Toss Panos – drums “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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