Tag Archive: Video


Lightnin’ Slim & Whispering Smith – Live 1972

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Dec 7, 2011

” From the American Folk Blues Festival 1972, live in Paris… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Yardbirds – Jeff Beck – Jimmy Page -Train Kept A Rollin’

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Feb 25, 2011

” Great Yardbirds clip with Page and a pissed off Beck! This beats the piss outta Duckface! “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American Folk Blues Festival 1962 – 1969 Vol 3

 

 

 

 

Published on Aug 1, 2013

” Tracks: Hound Dog (Big Mama Thornton), Gulfport Boogie (Roosevelt Sykes), Out of Sight (Buddy Guy), Feel So Good (Dr. Isaiah Ross), Flip, Flop & Fly (Joe Turner), All Night Long (Skip James), Crow Jane (Skip James), Got Sick & Tired (Bukka White), Death Letter Blues (Son House), Wild About You (Hound Dog Taylor), Wang Dang Doodle (Koko Taylor), Stranger Blues, Burnt Child (Afraid of Fire), Move Across the River (Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee), The Blues Ain’t Nothin’ But a Woman (Helen Humes) “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday Little Walter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be sure to read our birthday tribute to Mr Jacobs here 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Otis Rush

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Breaking into the R&B Top Ten his very first time out in 1956 with the startlingly intense slow blues “I Can’t Quit You Baby,” southpaw guitarist Otis Rush subsequently established himself as one of the premier bluesmen on the Chicago circuit. Rush is often credited with being one of the architects of the West side guitar style, along with Magic Sam and Buddy Guy. It’s a nebulous honor, since Rush played clubs on Chicago’s South side just as frequently during the sound’s late-’50s incubation period. Nevertheless, his esteemed status as a prime Chicago innovator is eternally assured by the ringing, vibrato-enhanced guitar work that remains his stock in trade and a tortured, super-intense vocal delivery that can force the hairs on the back of your neck upwards in silent salute. If talent alone were the formula for widespread success, Rush would certainly have been Chicago’s leading blues artist. But fate, luck, and the guitarist’s own idiosyncrasies conspired to hold him back on several occasions when opportunity was virtually begging to be accepted.

” Rush came to Chicago in 1948, met Muddy Waters, and knew instantly what he wanted to do with the rest of his life. The omnipresent Willie Dixon caught Rush‘s act and signed him to Eli Toscano‘s Cobra Records in 1956. The frighteningly intense “I Can’t Quit You Baby” was the maiden effort for both artist and label, streaking to number six on Billboard’s R&B chart. His 1956-1958 Cobra legacy is a magnificent one, distinguished by the Dixon-produced minor-key masterpieces “Double Trouble” and “My Love Will Never Die,” the tough-as-nails “Three Times a Fool” and “Keep on Loving Me Baby,” and the rhumba-rocking classic “All Your Love (I Miss Loving).” Rush apparently dashed off the latter tune in the car en route to Cobra’s West Roosevelt Road studios, where he would cut it with the nucleus of Ike Turner‘s combo.

  After Cobra closed up shop, Rush‘s recording fortunes mostly floundered. He followed Dixon over to Chess in 1960, cutting another classic (the stunning “So Many Roads, So Many Trains”) before moving on to Duke (one solitary single, 1962’s “Homework”), Vanguard, and Cotillion (there he cut the underrated Mike BloomfieldNick Gravenites-produced 1969 album Mourning in the Morning, with yeoman help from the house rhythm section in Muscle Shoals). Typical of Rush‘s horrendous luck was the unnerving saga of his Right Place, Wrong Time album.”Continue reading

 

 

 

 

Discography

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Howlin’ Wolf – How Many More Years

 

 

 

 

Published on Oct 10, 2012

” lyrics:
How many more years, have I got to let you dog me around
How many more years, have I got to let you dog me around
I’d soon rather be dead, sleeping six feet in the ground
I’m gonna fall on my knees, I’m gonna raise up my right hand
I’m gonna fall on my knees, I’m gonna raise up my right hand
Say I’d feel much better darling, if you’d just only understand
I’m going upstairs, I’m gonna bring back down my clothes
I’m going upstairs, I’m gonna bring back down my clothes, do them all
If anybody ask about me, just tell’em I walked out on”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bill Evans & Robben Ford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published on Mar 20, 2013

” Copyrights: BMG Rights Management
Bill Evans & Robben Ford – Soulgrass meets Blues, Miles & Beyond
(Estival Jazz Lugano 2010)
1. Lateral Climb
2. Cool Eddie
3. Don’t Worry ’bout Me
4. Oasis
5. Celtic Junction
6. Don’t Let The Sun Catch You Crying
7. Sweet Tea
8. Supernatural
9. Ode To The Working Man
10. Spoonful
Robben Ford – guitar
Bill Evans – saxophone
Etienne Mbappe – bass
Ryan Cavanaugh – banjo
Toss Panos – drums “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy 100th Birthday Johnny Shines  JB Hutto & Ma Rainey

 

Ma Rainey

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Ma Rainey wasn’t the first blues singer to make records, but by all rights she probably should have been. In an era when women were the marquee names in blues, Rainey was once the most celebrated of all; the “Mother of the Blues” had been singing the music for more than 20 years before she made her recording debut (Paramount, 1923). With the advent of blues records, she became even more influential, immortalizing such songs as “See See Rider,” “Bo-Weavil Blues,” and “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.” Like the other classic blues divas, she had a repertoire of pop and minstrel songs as well as blues, but she maintained a heavier, tougher vocal delivery than the cabaret blues singers who followed.Rainey‘s records featured her with jug bands, guitar duos, and bluesmen such as Tampa Red and Blind Blake, in addition to the more customary horns-and-piano jazz-band accompaniment (occasionally including such luminaries as Louis Armstrong, Kid Ory, and Fletcher Henderson).

  Born and raised in Columbus, Georgia, Ma Rainey (born Gertrude Pridgett) began singing professionally when she was a teenager, performing with a number of minstrel and medicine shows. In 1904, she married William “Pa” Rainey and she changed her name to “Ma” Rainey. The couple performed as “Rainey and Rainey, Assassinators of the Blues” and toured throughout the south, performing with several minstrel shows, circuses, and tent shows. According to legend, she gave a young Bessie Smith vocal lessons during this time. By the early ’20s, Rainey had become a featured performer on the Theater Owners’ Booking Association circuit.” Continue reading

 

Discography

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J B Hutto

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” J.B. Hutto — along with Hound Dog Taylor — was one of the last great slide guitar disciples of Elmore James to make it into the modern age. Hutto‘s huge voice, largely incomprehensible diction, and slash-and-burn playing was Chicago blues with a fierce, raw edge all its own. He entered the world of music back home in Augusta, GA, singing in the family-oriented group the Golden Crowns Gospel Singers. He came north to Chicago in the mid-’40s, teaching himself guitar and eventually landing his first paying job as a member of Johnny Ferguson & His Twisters. His recording career started in 1954 with two sessions for the Chance label supported by his original combo the Hawks (featuring George Mayweather on harmonica, Porkchop Hines on washboard traps, and Joe Custom on rhythm guitar), resulting in six of the nine songs recorded being issued as singles to scant acclaim. After breaking up the original band, Hutto worked outside of music for a good decade, part of it spent sweeping out a funeral parlor! He resurfaced around 1964 with a stripped-down version of the Hawks with two guitars and drums but no bass, working regularly at Turner’s Blue Lounge and recording blistering new sides for the first time in as many years.” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

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 Johnny Shines

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Best known as a traveling companion of Robert Johnson, Johnny Shines‘ own contributions to the blues have often been unfairly shortchanged, simply because Johnson‘s own legend casts such a long shadow. In his early days, Shines was one of the top slide guitarists in Delta blues, with his own distinctive, energized style; one that may have echoed Johnson‘s spirit and influence, but was never a mere imitation. Shines eventually made his way north to Chicago, and made the transition to electrified urban blues with ease, helped in part by his robust, impassioned vocals. He was vastly under-recorded during his prime years, even quitting the music business for a time, but was rediscovered in the late ’60s and recorded and toured steadily for quite some time. A 1980 stroke robbed him of some of his dexterity on guitar, but his voice remained a powerfully emotive instrument, and he performed up until his death in 1992.

  John Ned Shines was born April 26, 1915, in Frayser, TN, and grew up in Memphis from the age of six. Part of a musical family, he learned guitar from his mother, and as a youth he played for tips on the streets of Memphis with several friends, inspired by the likes of Charley Patton, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Lonnie Johnson, and the young Howlin’ Wolf. In 1932, he moved to Hughes, AR, to work as a sharecropper, keeping up his musical activities on the side; in 1935, he decided to try and make it as a professional musician. Shines had first met Robert Johnson in Memphis in 1934, and he began accompanying Johnson on his wanderings around the Southern juke-joint circuit, playing wherever they could find gigs; the two made their way as far north as Windsor, Ontario, where they appeared on a radio program. After around three years on the road together — which made Shines one of Johnson‘s most intimate associates, along with Johnson‘s stepson Robert Jr. Lockwood — the two split up in Arkansas in 1937, and never saw each other again before Johnson‘s death in 1938.” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

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Happy Birthday Albert King*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* See our proper tribute Happy Birthday Albert King

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mob Of Teenagers Beats Two High School Students In Philadelphia Subway Station

 

 

 

 

 

 

” A security video showing a mob of students brutally beating two high schoolers in a Philadelphia subway station on Tuesday is being investigated by the city’s transportation officers.

“ It’s an outrageous event. This is so dangerous, it’s not even funny,” Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority Police Chief Thomas J. Nestel III told Philly.com.

“ We have operating trains down there. There are passengers waiting for the train … it’s horrendous.”

  The video, which was time-stamped around 3:15 p.m., shows about a dozen teenagers either participating in a one-minute assault on two male students, or cheering it on.”

 

NY Daily News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Goin’ Down” – Jeff Beck ft Beth Hart

 

 

 

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Stevie Ray Vaughan – Live at Montreux (1985) Full Concert

 

 

 

 

 

Published on May 26, 2014

Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble performing live at the Montreux Jazz Festival in 1985

Tracklist :
1. Scuttle Buttin’ 1:41
2. Say What! 4:03
3. Ain’t Gone N’ Give Up On Love 8:45
4. Pride and Joy 15:09
5. Mary Had A Little Lamb 20:18
6. Cold Shot – (with Johnny Copeland) 24:26
7. Tin Pan Alley (aka Roughest Place In Town) – (with Johnny Copeland) 30:00
8. Look at little Sister – (with Johnny Copeland) 43:21
9. Voodoo Child (Slight Return) 52:07
10. Texas Flood 1:03:07
11. Life Without You 1:12:07
12. Gone Home 1:20:24
13. Couldn’t Stand The Weather 1:26:05 “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Deanna Bogart On WFPK’s Live Lunch

 

 

 

 

 

Published on Aug 22, 2014

” The Deanna Bogart Band stopped by to promote their new album Just a Wish Away.

http://www.deannabogart.com/
http://wfpk.org/

Set List:
Bye Bye Blackbird
In the Rain
Maybe I won’t
Fine by me if it’s good bayou “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I Put A Spell On You – Larry Carlton & Robben Ford

 

 

 

John Mayer – BB King – Blues Guitar

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday Alexis Korner

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Without Alexis Korner, there still might have been a British blues scene in the early 1960s, but chances are that it would have been very different from the one that spawned the Rolling Stones, nurtured the early talents of Eric Clapton, and made it possible for figures such as John Mayall to reach an audience. Born of mixed Turkish/Greek/Austrian descent, Korner spent the first decade of his life in France, Switzerland, and North Africa, and arrived in London in May of 1940, just in time for the German blitz, during which Korner discovered American blues. One of the most vivid memories of his teen years was listening to a record of bluesman Jimmy Yancey during a German air raid. “From then on,” he recalled in an interview, “all I wanted to do was play the blues.”

  After the war, Korner started playing piano and then guitar, and in 1947 he tried playing electric blues, but didn’t like the sound of the pick-ups that were then in use, and returned to acoustic playing. In 1949, he joined Chris Barber’s Jazz Band and in 1952 he became part of the much larger Ken Colyer Jazz Group, which had merged with Barber‘s band. Among those whom Korner crossed paths with during this era was Cyril Davies, a guitarist and harmonica player. The two found their interests in American blues completely complementary, and in 1954 they began making the rounds of the jazz clubs as an electric blues duo. They started the London Blues and Barrelhouse Club, where, in addition to their own performances, Korner and Davies brought visiting American bluesmen to listen and play. Very soon they were attracting blues enthusiasts from all over England.

   Korner and Davies made their first record in 1957, and in early 1962, they formed Blues Incorporated, a “supergroup” (for its time) consisting of the best players on the early-’60s British blues scene. Korner(guitar, vocals), Davies (harmonica, vocals), Ken Scott (piano), and Dick Heckstall-Smith (saxophone) formed the core, with a revolving membership featuring Charlie Watts or Graham Burbridge on drums,Spike Heatley or Jack Bruce on bass, and a rotating coterie of guest vocalists including Long John Baldry, Ronnie Jones, and Art Wood (older brother of Ron Wood). Most London jazz clubs were closed to them, so in March of 1962 they opened their own club, which quickly began attracting large crowds of young enthusiasts, among them Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, and Brian Jones, all of whom participated at some point with the group’s performances; others included Ian Stewart, Steve Marriott, Paul Jones, and Manfred Mann. In May of 1962, Blues Incorporated was invited to a regular residency at London’s Marquee Club, where the crowds grew even bigger and more enthusiastic. John Mayall later credited Blues Incorporated with giving him the inspiration to form his own Bluesbreakers group.”Continue reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Discography

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Happy Birthday To Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown & Lil Ed Williams Of The Blues Imperials

 

 

Mr Brown starts us off …

 

 

Biography

” Whatever you do, don’t refer to multi-instrumentalist Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown as a bluesman, although his imprimatur on the development of Texas blues is enormous. You’re liable to get him riled. If you must pigeonhole the legend, just call him an eclectic Texas musical master whose interests encompass virtually every roots genre imaginable.

  Brown learned the value of versatility while growing up in Orange, TX. His dad was a locally popular musician who specialized in country, Cajun, and bluegrass — but not blues. Later, Gate was entranced by the big bands of Count Basie, Lionel Hampton, and Duke Ellington (a torrid arrangement of “Take the ‘A’ Train” remains a centerpiece of Brown‘s repertoire). Tagged with the “Gatemouth” handle by a high school instructor who accused Brown of having a “voice like a gate,” Brown has used it to his advantage throughout his illustrious career. (His guitar-wielding brother, James “Widemouth” Brown, recorded “Boogie Woogie Nighthawk” for Jax in 1951.)

  In 1947, Gate’s impromptu fill-in for an ailing T-Bone Walker at Houston entrepreneur Don Robey‘s Bronze Peacock nightclub convinced Robey to assume control of Brown‘s career. After two singles for Aladdin stiffed, Robey inaugurated his own Peacock label in 1949 to showcase Brown‘s blistering riffs, which proved influential to a legion of Houston string-benders (Albert Collins, Johnny CopelandJohnny “Guitar” Watson, Cal Green, and many more have pledged allegiance to Brown‘s riffs). Peacock and its sister label Duke prospered through the ’50s and ’60s.” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

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Lil Ed and his Blues Imperials finish up the post …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Diminutive nicknames are common enough on the Chicago blues scene and in the case of Lil’ Ed Williams the “little” is even shrunken down. This hard-driving guitarist and vocalist is nonetheless a formidable presence in the former genre circa the new millennium and events such as his 2007 Rattleshake tour and album. By then Williams had led his Blues Imperials for more than 25 years off and on, inviting comparisons to the kick-ass blues-rock of Hound Dog Taylor & the Houserockers. The “lil'” fellow has a connection both stylistic and ancestral with guitarist J.B. Hutto, a uniquely rough-hewn performer in his own right. Hutto would certainly have been proud to see his nephew go from working in a car wash to teaching Conan O’Brien how to play the blues in a skit on national television.” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

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Ready For The Blues – 22 Vintage Blues Tracks – One Hour Of Blues

 

 

 

 

Published on Dec 29, 2014

” Ready For The Blues – 22 Vintage Blues Tracks
♫ SUBSCRIBE HERE : http://bit.ly/10VoH4l
Find the album here: http://amzn.to/1D1r3gAhttp://bit.ly/1xqhSo0http://bit.ly/1Be5Grb
Join us on facebook : http://on.fb.me/1yY77w3
00:00 – Don’t Start Me Talkin’ – Sugar Blue
03:56 – Still a Fool – Muddy Waters, Little Walter
07:14 – That’s Allright – Jimmy Rogers
10:06 – My Babe – Little Walter
12:51 – Rock Me – Muddy Waters, James Cotton
16:05 – Shake the Boogie – Sonny Boy Williamson
18:53 – All Night Boogie – Howlin Wolf
21:11 – I’m a Man – Bo Diddley, Billy Boy Arnold
24:15 – I’m In the Mood – John Lee Hooker, Eddie Kirkland
27:25 – King Biscuit Stomp – Big Joe Williams
30:00 – The Blues That Made Me Drunk – Sonny Boy Williamson
33:02 – Chicago Breakdown – Doctor Ross
35:59 – Baker Shop Boogie – James Cotton, Willie Nix
38:44 – Evening Sun – Big Walter Horton, Johnny Shines
41:14 – Easy – Big Walter Horton
44:18 – Jump the Boogie – Papa Lightfoot
46:41 – Mambo Chillun – John Lee Hooker
49:36 – Standing At the Crossraods – Elmore James
52:24 – Saturday Night – Roy Brown
54:46 – Straight Alky Blues – Leroy Carr
58:09 – Chicken Hearted Woman – Clarence Samuels
01:00:50 – Sugar Mama – Pee Wee Hughes

  JazzAndBluesExperience – SUBSCRIBE HERE : http://bit.ly/10VoH4l (Re)Discover the Jazz and Blues greatest hits – JazznBluesExperience is your channel for all the best jazz and blues music. Find your favorite songs and artists and experience the best of jazz music and blues music. Subscribe for free to stay connected to our channel and easily access our video updates! – Facebook FanPage:http://www.facebook.com/JazznBluesExp… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remy: Best Song Ever! (Tax Code Edition)

 

 

 

Published on Apr 15, 2015

Remy channels One Direction to help us understand the tax code.

Written and performed by Remy. Music tracks and background vocals by Ben Karlstrom. Produced and edited by Meredith Bragg.

Approximately 2 minutes.

Visit http://reason.com/reasontv/2015/04/15… for downloadable versions and subscribe to Reason TV’s YouTube channel to get automatic notifications when new material goes live. You can follow Reason on Twitter at @reason and follow Remy on Twitter at @goremy.

LYRICS:
Make them pay four months of earnings (oh, that’s a good one)
Have them look for lost receipts (ooh, I like it!)
They’ll have about as much fun
as their last colonoscopy
People everywhere will get ripped off…
the paper version of the Apple Watch

And we’ll dance all night, it’s the best code ever
Some folks pay a lot, others they pay never
And you’ll get tax breaks if you’re really clever
It’ll take so long, it’s the best code ever
They’ll be like “oh, oh no”
We’ll be like “yeah, yeah, yeah.”
We’ll be like “awww.”

You may have heard that all your info
on our systems can be hacked with ease
But rest assured if they don’t get them
they’ll be in the care of folks like these
Yes historians will all agree
among the greatest works in history

And we’ll dance all night, it’s the best code ever
Some folks pay a lot, others they pay never
and if you don’t comply you’ll go to jail, however
Why would you not file? It’s the best code ever
They’ll be like “Oh, oh no”
We’ll be like “yeah, yeah, yeah” “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yesterday We Were In Error With A Birthday . It Was Tommy Castro’s And Not Coco Montoya’s . Today We Make Amends.

 

 

 

 

Biography

” According to all the press and hype and hoopla for a time during the 1990s, Tommy Castro was pegged as the next big star of the blues. Long a favorite among Bay Area music fans, Castro — in the space of two album releases — took his music around the world and back again with a sheaf of praise from critics and old-time blues musicians alike. His music was a combination of soul-inflected rockers with the occasional slow blues or shuffle thrown into the mix to keep it honest. His vocals were laid-back and always a hair behind the beat, while his scorching guitar tone was Stevie Ray Stratocaster-approved. Crossover success did not seem out of the question.

  Born and raised in San Jose, California, Castro started playing guitar at the tender age of ten. Initially inspired by Mike Bloomfield, Eric Clapton, and Elvin Bishop, he started the inevitable journey into the roots of his heroes and discovered and quickly became enamored of B.B. King, Buddy Guy, Elmore James, Muddy Waters, and Freddie King. His vocal styling came from constant listening to Ray Charles, Wilson Pickett, James Brown, and Otis Redding. After playing with numerous Bay Area groups honing his chops, he landed a gig playing guitar for the San Francisco band the Dynatones, who were then signed to Warner Bros. The two-year stint augured well for Castro, playing to the biggest crowds he had seen up to that point and backing artists as diverse as Carla Thomas and Albert King.” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

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Today We Bid Happy Birthday To Bessie Smith And Coco Montoya

 

 

First a taste of Ms Bessie Smith ...

 

 

 

Biography

 

” The first major blues and jazz singer on record and one of the most powerful of all time, Bessie Smith rightly earned the title of “The Empress of the Blues.” Even on her first records in 1923, her passionate voice overcame the primitive recording quality of the day and still communicates easily to today’s listeners (which is not true of any other singer from that early period). At a time when the blues were in and most vocalists (particularly vaudevillians) were being dubbed “blues singers,” Bessie Smith simply had no competition.

  Back in 1912, Bessie Smith sang in the same show as Ma Rainey, who took her under her wing and coached her. Although Rainey would achieve a measure of fame throughout her career, she was soon surpassed by her protégée. In 1920, Smith had her own show in Atlantic City and, in 1923, she moved to New York. She was soon signed by Columbia and her first recording (Alberta Hunter‘s “Downhearted Blues”) made her famous. Bessie Smith worked and recorded steadily throughout the decade, using many top musicians as sidemen on sessions including Louis Armstrong, Joe Smith (her favorite cornetist), James P. Johnson, and Charlie Green. Her summer tent show Harlem Frolics was a big success during 1925-1927, and Mississippi Days in 1928 kept the momentum going.” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

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And now some Coco Montoya …

 

 

Biography

 

” Though he grew up as a drummer and was raised on rock & roll, Coco Montoya became an outstanding blues guitarist after stints in the bands of Albert Collins and John MayallMontoya debuted as a leader in 1995 with the Blind Pig album Gotta Mind to Travel and garnered an award for Best New Blues Artist at the following year’s W.C. Handy Awards ceremonies.

  Born in Santa Monica, Montoya played drums for a local rock band that toured the region during the mid-’70s, playing in area clubs. Although he had recently been turned on to blues at an Albert King show, he was somewhat unprepared to sit in with another blues legend — “the Iceman” Albert Collins — when a bar-owner friend of Montoya invited the bluesman to play at his nightclub. Though his inexperience showed, the young drummer impressed Collins enough to hire him for a Pacific Northwest tour three months later. The tour soon ended, but the pair’s affiliation remained for more than five years, while Montoya learned much about the handling of blues guitar from “the Master of the Telecaster.” ” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

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Oklahoma Deputy Tells Dying Man Shot By Accident, “Fuck Your Breath,” As He Gasps His Final Breaths

 

 

 

” A 73-year-old volunteer Oklahoma deputy who has donated thousands of dollars of items to the Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office over the years was allowed to participate in a high-profile sting operation where he ended up killing a man by accident.

  Reserve deputy  Robert Bates said he only meant to tase Eric Harris instead of shooting him to death.

  Bates can be heard apologizing for shooting the suspect before dropping the gun in a body cam video that is going viral.

  The shooting took place April 2, even though the date on the body cam footage reads 2008.

  Harris, who had led deputies on a pursuit after he attempted to sell a gun and ammo to an undercover cop, is seen on the ground with a deputy’s knee on his head.”

 

Photography Is Not A Crime has more on yet another senseless police killing 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Albert Castiglia – Somebody Loan Me A Dime – North Atlantic Blues Fest

 

 

Published on Jul 17, 2012

” North Atlantic Blues Festival Rockland Maine July 2012 “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carlos Santana & Buddy Guy – Montreux Jazz Festival

 

 

 

Uploaded on Oct 23, 2006

” http://www.marinoshop.com.br – 1982 Drinkin’ TNT ‘n’ Smokin’ Dynamite (live) — Blind Pig (rec. 1974 Montreax Jazz Fest.)
Carlos Augusto Alves Santana (born July 20, 1947), known simply as Carlos Santana or Santana, is a Grammy Award-winning Mexican-born American Latin rock musician and guitarist.
He became famous in the late 1960s and early 1970s with his band, the Santana Blues Band, going mostly under the title “Santana,” which created a highly successful blend of salsa, rock, blues, and jazz fusion. Their sound featured his often high-pitched and distorted guitar lines set against Latin American instrumentation such as timbales and congas. Santana continued to work in these forms over the following decades, and experienced a sudden resurgence of popularity and critical acclaim in the late 1990s.
Over his career he has sold an estimated 80 million albums worldwide.

  George “Buddy” Guy (born July 30, 1936) is an American blues and rock guitarist and singer. Known as an inspiration to Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and other 1960s blues and rock legends, Guy is considered an important exponent of Chicago blues. He is the father of female rapper Shawnna.
Guy is known for his showmanship; for example, he plays his guitar with drumsticks, or strolls into the audience while jamming and trailing a long guitar cord.
Born in Lettsworth, Louisiana, Guy grew up in Louisiana where he learned to play guitar at a womens trucker convention[citation needed]. In the early ’50s he began performing with bands in Baton Rouge. Soon after moving to Chicago in 1957, Guy fell under the influence of Muddy Waters. In 1958, a competition with West Side guitarists Magic Sam and Otis Rush gave Guy a record contract. Soon afterwards he recorded for the Cobra label. He recorded sessions with Junior Wells for Delmark Records under the pseudonym Friendly Chap in 1965 and 1966. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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