Tag Archive: World War II


Hiroo Onoda, Japanese Soldier Who Long Refused To Surrender, Dies At 91

 

 

 

” Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier who refused to stop fighting World War II until the 1970s, has died in Tokyo at the age of 91.

  During the war, Onoda was sent to the small island of Lubang in the western Philippines to spy on U.S. forces in the area.

  He ended up remaining there, eking out a life in the jungle, until 1974, nearly three decades after Japan surrendered.

  Allied forces defeated the Japanese imperial army in the Philippines in 1944, but Onoda evaded capture and stayed on. “

 

Story Continues

 

   We are pleased to present a four part documentary about Lt. Hiroo Onoda and his thirty years in the jungles of the Philippines . Part one is above the fold and parts two through four are below .

 

Uploaded on Jun 8, 2010

” Japan surrendered in 1945, ending World War II. But the war continued for another 29 years in the mind of Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese intelligence officer assigned to Lubang Island off Mindoro . When he finally emerged from the jungle in 1974 and returned to Japan , he was celebrated as a devoted soldier.

  Howie Severino and his I-Witness team retrace some of Onoda’s steps in the rugged forest of Lubang and imagine his life in the wild. But they also discover some ugly truths about what he did to survive and persist in his mission.”

 

 

 

” When the Allied Forces returned to Lubang Island in 1945, the Japanese military had no choice but to retreat. Hoping for a Japanese counterattack, Onoda and his men did everything to survive in the jungle and prepared themselves to fight till the end. Surrender was not an option.”

 

 

 

” For many years since World War II, Lt. Hiroo Onoda and his three Japanese soldiers lived off the resources of the jungle and of the residents of Lubang Island — armed with warrior instincts of survival, force and intimidation. For 29 years, going to the jungle was no easy task for the residents because somewhere in that expanse was Lt. Onoda, the lone surviving Japanese guerrilla who continued to carryout his military orders. For 29 years, some Filipino lives were lost for a war that no longer existed.”

 

 

 
” Howie Severino and outdoorsman David Tajan enter the jungles of Lubang Island to retrace the trails of Lt. Onoda. How did this environment define the hero that Lt. Onoda now is? And where do the casualties of war, the Lubang residents, fit in a war that is only imagined? “

 

 

Say what you will but Lt Onoda understood commitment .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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These 20 Photographs Will Leave You Speechless. Especially The 6th One.There Are No Words

 

 

The Last man …

 

World War II veteran from Belarus Konstantin Pronin, 86, sits on a bench as he waits for his comrades at Gorky park during Victory Day in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, May 9, 2011. Konstantin comes to this place every year. This year he was the only person from the unit to show.

” World War II veteran from Belarus Konstantin Pronin, 86, sits on a bench as he waits for his comrades at Gorky park during Victory Day in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, May 9, 2011. Konstantin comes to this place every year. This year he was the only person from the unit to show. “

Sunset on Mars, taken in 2005 by the Spirit rover.

” Sunset on Mars, taken in 2005 by the Spirit rover.”

One more heartbreaking photo too powerful to miss 

 

 

Two engineers died when the windmill they were working on caught fire. This might be the last picture taken of them alive. Picture was taken on October 29th, 2013 in the Netherlands.

 

 

” Two engineers died when the windmill they were working on caught fire. This might be the last picture taken of them alive. Picture was taken on October 29th, 2013 in the Netherlands. “

 

 

See Them All 

Common Core Aligned Curriculum and Pearl Harbor. Missouri House Education Committee: Please Read

 

 

 

 

” From Terrence Moore and A Textbook That Should Live in Infamy: The Common Core Assaults World War II:

 If you want to understand Common Core aligned curriculum in action, Moore deconstructs the method of close reading and how American history is now taught to students:

  There is more than a little sophistry taking place here: an alarming superficiality and political bias that pervades all the Common Core textbooks (as I have illustrated in my book The Story-Killers: A Common Sense Case Against the Common Core). There is no reading in this chapter ostensibly devoted to World War II that tells why America entered the war. There is no document on Pearl Harbor or the Rape of Nanking or the atrocities committed against the Jews or the bombing of Britain. The book contains no speech of Winston Churchill or F.D.R. even though the reading of high-caliber “informational texts” is the new priority set by the Common Core, and great rhetoric has always been the province of an English class. There is not a single account of a battle or of American losses or of the liberation of Europe. The editors do not balance Jarrell’s poem with the much more famous war song “Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition” that ends with the line, “And we’ll all stay free!” The rest of this chapter consists in a poster of a junk rally to gather metals for the making of munitions, a New York Times editorial, and a political cartoon penned by Dr. Seuss (who supported the war). There is not a single document or sentence in the chapter that would make a young reader consider the Axis Powers anything other than “enemies” in quotes.Essentially, all of World War II has been reduced to dropping the bomb and consequently, we are led to believe, America’s inhumanity. In short, the entire presentation of the Second World War is not an exercise in critical thinking; nor will it make students “college and career ready.” This is not teaching. It is programming, pure and simple.”

 

 

 

Common Core = Leftist revisionism = indoctrination = brainwashing = typical public school education = SHAME

Read the whole thing including the links

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 New Book Tells The Extraordinary Story Of The Children Who Believe They Are A WWII pilot, Star Golfer And A Hollywood Agent From A Past Life – And have This Scientist Utterly Convinced

Dr. Tucker, in a follow-up to his book Life Before Life, explores American cases of young children who report memories of previous lives

 

 

” How could anyone possibly take seriously a three-year-old golfing prodigy’s claim to be legendary 13-time major winner Bobby Jones? Or another boy from Louisiana who recalls being a Second World War pilot shot down over the Pacific?

A world renowned professor for a start. Dr Jim Tucker’s remarkable experiences with these children, many who can recall intimate details of their past lives in pin-sharp detail – and with no prompting – has led him to the conclusion that reincarnation is real.

Over the past 10-years, Dr Jim Tucker has traveled the country meeting  families and hearing fantastical incredible stories just like these, which he outlines in his new book, Return To Life: Extraordinary Cases Of Children Who Remember Past Lives.

    This is very strange and we’re not sure what to make of it , not being at all well-versed in the more spiritual side of life we can think of little to add to the conversation of afterlife and re-incarnation other than … Cool !

 

 

” Dr Tucker’s explanation for his belief in reincarnation may be mind-boggling but it is far from outlandish.

He bases it in the ever-developing field of quantum mechanics, pioneered by scientific luminaries such as Albert Einstein.

Dr Tucker believes that because quantum physics demonstrates that conscious observation can be critical in determining physical events, he argues that consciousness might actually be separate from the brain and exists apart from our physical bodies.

He believes that the brain might in fact simply be a conduit for consciousness to inhabit our bodies but is transient through time and space.

He provides the analogy of a television set and the television transmission; the television is required to decode the signal, but it does not create the signal. In a similar way the brain may be required for consciousness to express itself, but may not be the source of consciousness.”

    As we said above , we know squat about the spiritual realm and have never given much thought to the idea of re-incarnation but the Professor’s concept of the brain being a kind of receiver for the soul to broadcast itself to the mortal world is a fascinating proposition and beckons the mind in a hundred different directions .

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II’s Surviving Doolittle Raiders Make Final Toast

 

 

” Known as the Doolittle Raiders, the 80 men who risked their lives on a World War II bombing mission on Japan after the attack on Pearl Harbor were toasted one last time by their surviving comrades and honored with a Veterans Day weekend of fanfare shared by thousands.’

 

 

 

 

” Three of the four surviving Raiders attended the toast Saturday at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. Their late commander, Lt. Gen. James “Jimmy” Doolittle, started the tradition but they decided this autumn’s ceremony would be their last.”

 

 

 

 

” “May they rest in peace,” Lt. Col. Richard Cole, 98, said before he and fellow Raiders — Lt. Col. Edward Saylor, 93, and Staff Sgt. David Thatcher, 92 — sipped cognac from specially engraved silver goblets. The 1896 cognac was saved for the occasion after being passed down from Doolittle.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WWII Vets Knock Over Shutdown Barrier To Visit Memorial

 

 

WWII vets

 

 

” A group of World War II veterans in an Honor Flight group Tuesday knocked over barriers imposed during the government shutdown at the WWII Memorial in Washington, D.C., to get inside.

As part of the federal government shutdown, national parks are closed. But the group of veterans continued to the monument Tuesday, as reported by Stars and Stripes reporter Leo Shane.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another Racial Attack That The White House Is SurelyUnaware Of

 

” An elderly World War II veteran was beaten to death outside a lodge in Spokane, Wash. and police said two black teenagers are suspect in the horrific crime.

Delbert Belton was left for dead outside the Eagles Lodge Wednesday night. The 89-year-old was on his way inside to shoot a game of pool when the two teenagers brutally attacked him and left him for dead.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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SS Gairsoppa: 61 Tons of Silver Found in Odyssey Exploration

 

 

 

” Odyssey Marine Exploration Inc. recovered 61 tons of silver this month from the SS Gairsoppa, a World War II shipwreck lodged nearly three miles below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Ireland.

Odyssey recovered 1,574 silver ingots weighing a total of about 1.8 million ounces from the SS Gairsoppa, the Tampa, Florida-based deep-sea salvage company said in a statement Monday. The 412-foot (126-meter) British cargo ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat in February 1941, according to Bloomberg.

The metal was worth about $630,000 when the Gairsoppa was sunk and about $36 million at today’s prices. Odyssey has recovered a total of 2,792 ingots from the wreck, about 99 percent of the insured silver reported to be aboard when the vessel sank.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

B-17 Bombing Missions in Color: “The Memphis Belle” 1944 US Army Air Forces in World War II

 

The Memphis Belle: A Story of a Flying Fortress is a 1944 documentary film which ostensibly provides an account of the final mission of the crew of the Memphis Belle, a Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress. In May 1943 it became the first U.S. Army Air Forces heavy bomber to complete 25 missions over Europe and return to the United States.

The dramatic 16 mm color film of actual battles was made by cinematographer First Lieutenant Harold J. Tannenbaum. The film was directed by Major William Wyler, narrated by Eugene Kern, and had scenes at its Bassingbourn base photographed by Hollywood cinematographer Captain William H. Clothier. It was made under the auspices of the First Motion Picture Unit, a branch of the United States Army Air Forces. The film actually depicted the next to last mission of the crew (see below) on May 15, 1943, and was made as a morale-building inspiration for the Home Front by showing the everyday courage of the men who manned these bombers…

Production

Morgan’s crew had not flown all of its missions together. Captain Verinis had originally been Morgan’s co-pilot at the beginning of their combat tour but had become a “first pilot” (aircraft commander) in his own right on December 30, 1942, after which he flew 16 missions as commander of a replacement B-17 he named Connecticut Yankee after his home state. Verinis finished his tour two days before the rest of Morgan’s crew.

Nor was Morgan’s crew the one originally selected by Wyler for filming. He had been following Captain Oscar O’Neill (whose bomber was named Invasion 2nd) of the 401st Bomb Squadron until O’Neill’s B-17 and five others were shot down over Bremen, Germany, on April 17, 1943. Morgan was then selected and his crew re-united by the Eighth Air Force to complete its tour together and to return to the United States for a war bond drive. Wyler also informed Morgan when asked that had the Memphis Belle been shot down on the crew’s final mission, Wyler had a backup crew working with another B-17 about to finish its 25 missions, Hell’s Angels of the nearby 303d Bombardment Group. Ironically, Hell’s Angels actually completed 25 missions first, on May 13 (the date of the 21st for the Memphis Belle).

Morgan states in his memoirs that he was approached by Wyler in late January 1943 after his crew’s eighth mission. Wyler told Morgan he wanted to film the Memphis Belle and her crew because of “a certain mystique” to the aircraft’s nickname, and that Morgan’s reputation as a pilot meant that Wyler would be “in the center of the action…(with) a pretty good chance of coming back.” Morgan agreed after assurances from Wyler that the film crew would not interfere with operation of the airplane in combat in any way.

The first mission flown in filming, ironically, was not aboard the Memphis Belle, but aboard the B-17 Jersey Bounce on a February 26, 1943, mission to Wilhelmshaven, Germany. (The Memphis Belle was being repaired after severe battle damage incurred on February 16.) The mission experienced heavy German fighter attacks and two of the 91st group’s B-17s were shot down. Despite the hazards, Wyler filmed at least six more combat missions with Morgan’s crew, not all of them aboard the Memphis Belle, using a set-up that placed mounted cameras in the nose, tail, right waist, and radio hatch positions. The camera setup is documented in the photograph of the Bad Penny, which Morgan and Wyler flew on a mission to Antwerp on April 5, 1943.

The 16 mm color film used did not include sound, and this was added later in Hollywood. The original crew, during their war bonds drive in the United States, made typical appropriate comments to each other while watching the silent movie in a studio. The result was difficult to distinguish from real combat recordings.

King George VI (wearing a Marshal of the Royal Air Force uniform) and his consort Queen Elizabeth are seen congratulating the crew on May 18, after Morgan’s final mission but the day before that of the B-17… “

 

Ban On Displaying Guns At City Museums Should Be Lifted, Ald. Burke Says

 

 

” The city’s most powerful alderman — Edward Burke (14th) — introduced an ordinance at Wednesday’s City Council meeting that would allow Chicago museums to display unloaded firearms for historical purposes.

Currently, city museums are prohibited from lawfully displaying firearms of historic value, according to the city’s long-standing gun ordinance.

Burke said Wednesday he recently learned of the “anomaly in the city code.”

“Museums are caught in a dilemma that if they have in their collections artifacts that can be defined as firearms, even though there’s historical significance to the memento, they can’t be registered in the city and can’t be displayed,” Burke said.

Burke cited the example of Major General William P. Levine, one of the very first American soldiers to liberate the Dachau concentration camp during World War II.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Marlin Machine Guns

 

 

” Most Marlin owners know of their long legacy of lever action rifles, .22 rimfire guns, and others. However, what most don’t know is that the company was one of the largest manufacturers of machine guns in World War One. 

The Marlin Machine Guns - christophereger - colt-m1895-2-7.jpg

The Colt-Marlin Light Machine Gun

 

” In 1915, during World War I, a New York syndicate bought the company from the sons of John Marlin, the company’s founder, and renamed it the Marlin Rockwell Corporation (MRC). In that same year, MRC obtained license to the 1895 Colt Light Machine Gun. Colt had been manufacturing their ‘potato-digger’ machine gun for twenty years and the weapon had been made in a half dozen calibers not only for the US Army and Navy but also for Belgium, Canada, France, Italy, and Imperial Russia. With World War I becoming a boom for Colt and other firearms manufacturers producing weapons for Western European clients, the company was anxious to rid itself of the old Model 1895. Colt sold all of the rights, tooling, plans, and patents to MRC and washed their hands of the old potato digger.” 

Today all of these Marlin guns are rarely encountered and when they do run over $10,000 in working condition. Not bad for a weapon that fought in two world wars.” 

Gun Review: Mauser P08: ‘Everything It’s Hyped To Be’ (VIDEO)

 

 

 

 

” It was one of the first semi-automatic pistols and the design was so good that it saw service through two World Wars. As a matter of fact, it continues to be used around the world today. Was it John M. Browning’s M1911? Nope — Georg J. Luger’s. We’re talking, of course, about the Mauser P08.

It’s a gun I knew and loved through the war movies I grew up watching. While I always rooted for the ‘good guys’ to defeat the Nazis, I always thought that the Germans had the cooler pistols. But it wasn’t until very recently that I had a chance to actually shoot a WWII-era version, a 4-inch barrel standard-army one made by Mauser in the early part of the war. And it was everything it’s hyped to be, so I was not disappointed.

Now, I won’t diss the 1911 because I love the design, and own several examples of it myself. Browning was a genius of the first water. But the P08 — commonly called the ‘Luger’ after its designer — is still a very cool design. I think that it is the articulated joint mechanism that operates it. It’s an obvious mechanical connection to an older time, like an evolutionary link that allows you to see something of how the thing works.”

 

 

‘Dirty Dozen’ WWII Hero Dies

” James “Jake” McNiece, a World War II hero whose leadership inspired the 1967 film “The Dirty Dozen,” died Monday at the age of 93.

The Oklahoman reported:

Hours before the June 6, 1944, D-Day invasion, McNiece led 18 paratroopers behind enemy lines to destroy two bridges and control a third to prevent German reinforcements from moving into Normandy and to cut off retreating German troops. Sixteen of his men were killed during the 36-day mission, in which they also cut enemy communications and supply lines.

France presented McNiece with the Legion of Honor Medal, France’s highest order, in September. “

HT/This Ain’t Hell

 

 

The Welrod Assassin Gun: WWII’s Phantom Plinker Supressed Pistol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Actually made before the MkI (dont ask), the MkII was the most common type of Welrod with some 14,000 produced.  It was rather heavy for a weapon designed to be secreted away at 38-ounces and was

Welrod MK II could make use of captured German, Italian and Japanese ammunition.

slightly over a foot long. Chambered for .32ACP (7.65x17mm), the same caliber as many popular ItalianGerman, and Japanese pistols, the gun was stated to be able to fire a 72-grain Kynoch lead head at 920fps. Its single stack magazine held 8-shots.

The German military captured many of the weapons dropped to European Resistance groups and the MkII Welrod was often in these caches. The SS special operations groups led by Otto Skorzeny (called once the most dangerous man in Europe) are known to have carried the occasional Welrod. A number were given as reverse-Lend Lease to the US Navy who referred to them as “.32 Hand Firing Mechanism Mk.1 Mod 0″ to obscure its use as a weapon of special applications. Many of these later were passed on to the CIA.

A Black Hole of Information

The individual who invented the Welrod or even company that manufactured them is a matter of conjecture and is a question that has never been definitively answered. Even the name ‘Welrod’ has never been fully explained other than in urban legends that have found their way onto the Internet over the yearsWhile small resolution diagrams abound, the full and correct set of manufacturer’s blue prints have seemingly never been declassified. Additionally, the guns were almost completely unmarked so they could be deniable if captured. It is thought that BSA made the Welrod production pistols, although this information is still classified. “

 

 

 

Combining War Photos with Photos of Today

 

Prague (1944). Powder Tower. People meet the Soviet liberating T-34 tanks and soldiers riding them.

 

 

 

” Many structures and buildings have been rebuilt after World War 2, but the history will always remain in photos. Take a look at this amazing collection of “now & then” photo combinations created by Sergey Larenkov. “

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks Kid

Duffel Bag Of WWII Soldier, 92, Returned 7 Decades After Going Missing; Was Sent By French Boy

 

William Kadar

 

” MERRILLVILLE, Ind. — A World War II veteran who served in France during the war has been reunited with his Army-issued duffel bag nearly seven decades after it went missing.

Ninety-two-year-old William Kadar of Merrillville opened a carefully wrapped package Tuesday to find his drab green duffel bag inside. The folded up bag is still stenciled with his name and serial number. “

 

 

 

Related :

 

WWII soldier’s duffel bag returned 7 decades later

92-YEAR-OLD WWII SOLDIER GETS HIS MISSING DUFFEL BAG BACK

The Real Scoop on Sound Suppression

” Thanks to Hollywood, gun mufflers, sound suppressors or “silencers”—one and the same—are viewed in a negative context by many non-shooters. But the truth is that noise suppressors are used daily—as they have been for more than a century—to enhance safety, ease instruction and improve accuracy for shooters of all demographics.

How Do They Work?
The first thing you need to understand is that when a cartridge is fired, there is no gunpowder “explosion” in the way that some may think. Smokeless gunpowder does not explode, it just burns very fast. The primer ignites when struck by the firing pin, and the powder is ignited by the primer. As it burns, it forms a very high-pressure gas, forcing the bullet down and out the barrel followed by all the residual hot gas. The loud “boom” you hear is the expulsion of gasses happening all at once, with little or no restriction.

Thanks to Hollywood, gun mufflers, sound suppressors or “silencers”—one and the same—are viewed in a negative context by many non-shooters. But the truth is that noise suppressors are used daily—as they have been for more than a century—to enhance safety, ease instruction and improve accuracy for shooters of all demographics.

How Do They Work?
The first thing you need to understand is that when a cartridge is fired, there is no gunpowder “explosion” in the way that some may think. Smokeless gunpowder does not explode, it just burns very fast. The primer ignites when struck by the firing pin, and the powder is ignited by the primer. As it burns, it forms a very high-pressure gas, forcing the bullet down and out the barrel followed by all the residual hot gas. The loud “boom” you hear is the expulsion of gasses happening all at once, with little or no restriction.

To put the function of a sound suppressor it in its simplest terms, the suppressor works by slowing, redirecting and cooling the hot gasses created when the cartridge is fired. We can get into all kinds of scientific terminology, but that is the general function. If we relate it to something we are all familiar with, it will be easier to understand. Think of a balloon. If you release the gas very fast by use of a pin, it will make a “boom.” If you untie the knot and let go, the high-pressure gas inside will bleed out a little slower through the sputtering neck, making much less noise. If you hold the end when untied and slowly let the air out by using pressure of your fingers to control the flow, it will make very little noise, if any. A modern suppressor would fit roughly between the last two examples. “

Silencerco Sound Check



Woman Turns In Historic Nazi Assault Rifle At Conn. Gun Buy-Back

 

Most gun collectors would love to have one of these in their safe , we know we would .

 

 

 

 

 

 ” When police officers announced this year’s gun buy-back program would allow residents to exchange their guns for Wal-Mart gift certificates, they never expected a woman possessing a World War II-era Nazi Assault Rifle to take the bait.

But that’s exactly what happened in Hartford, Conn. over the weekend.

“It’s like finding the Babe Ruth of baseball cards. The rarity, it was made for such a very short period,” Officer John Cavanna, one of the two officers who discovered the gun, told ABC News. “

Pearl Harbor in Perspective

 

 

 

 

 

 ” December 7, 1941 is a date which will live in infamy.  Any unfounded illusions held by peace-loving Americans concerning the intentions of Imperial Japan or its ally Nazi Germany were painfully but necessarily shattered that day, on which our nation was stirred into action before it was too late to stop the threat that the Axis powers posed to us and the rest of the world.

 

Franklin Roosevelt is universally acclaimed as a good war president, guiding the United States through an unprecedented time of global upheaval.  His domestic policies, however, granted enormous powers to the federal government that it has not since failed to abuse. “

 

Pearl Harbor (61 Photos)

 

 

 

Random-12_07_12-Pearl-920-25

 … YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT RATE HIGHEST SINCE WWII

 

 

 

 

 ” California’s overall employment rate for people aged 16-19 clocks in at just 18 percent; its high school graduation rate is a paltry 76 percent.

Young people in America are losing their future. Sadly, they don’t have enough basic education to realize that – they think that the government ought to be bigger, according to the latest polls. “

 

 Air Force Missile Site 8 – That Nearly Began World War 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 ” Retired top-secret installations are nothing short of jaw-dropping, and this one is nothing short of that. This top secret facility was also once known as Titan II ICBM Site 571-7because of the massive Titan II missile that it housed inside of it.

Located about 15 miles south of Tucson, this large 8 level installation is now a museum. During the time of its operation it was one of the most important missile sites. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WWII Snipers

Cheaper Than Dirt

“Of the top ten deadliest snipers of World War II, all but one were from the former Soviet Union. Those nine combined kills totaled 4,074. The rifle of choice, the Mosin Nagant (Винтовка Мосина). Remember that the next time someone laughs at your Mosin. What was the second best sniper rifle of WWII?”

 

Remember

MEMORIAL DAY

The military don’t start wars.  Politicians start wars.  ~William Westmoreland

Remember

Nathan Hale, Spy and State Hero

Nathan Hale, a martyr soldier of the American Revolution, was born in Coventry, Conn., June 6, 1755. When but little more than twenty-one years old he was hanged, by order of General William Howe, as a spy, in the city of New York, on September 22, 1776.”

Napoleon :

“Soldiers usually win the battles and generals get the credit for them.”

Remember

“Historians know little about Crispus Attucks, and they have constructed accounts of his life more from speculation than facts. Most documents described his ancestry as African and American Indian. His father, Prince Yonger, is thought to have been a slave brought to America from Africa and that his mother, Nancy Attucks, was a Natick Indian. The family, which may have included an older sister named Phebe, lived in Framingham, Massachusetts.”

Otto Von Bismarck :

“Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think hard before starting a war.”

Remember

“Not all of the women soldiers of the Civil War were discharged so quickly. Some women served for years, like Sarah Emma Edmonds Seelye, and others served the entire war, like Albert D. J. Cashier. These two women are the best known and most fully documented of all the women combatants.”

General Ulysses S Grant :

 “Wherever the enemy goes, let our troops go also.”

Remember

The Battle of Chickamauga    35,000 Casualties 

September 18-20, 1863

“After the Tullahoma Campaign, Rosecrans renewed his offensive, aiming to force the Confederates out of Chattanooga. The three army corps comprising Rosecrans’ s army split and set out for Chattanooga by separate routes. In early September, Rosecrans consolidated his forces scattered in Tennessee and Georgia and forced Bragg’s army out of Chattanooga, heading south.”

Albert Pike :

“What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal”

Remember

26th Colored US Pennsylvania

Giuseppe Garibaldi :

“I offer neither pay, nor quarters, nor food; I offer only hunger, thirst, forced marches, battles and death. Let him who loves his country with his heart, and not merely with his lips, follow me.”

Remember

                                     

The Spanish-American War

John “Black Jack” Pershing :

“The deadliest weapon in the world is a Marine and his rifle!”

Remember

The Argonne World War I

General George S Patton :

 “Always do everything you ask of those you command.”

Remember

D Day , Omaha Beach

General Robert E Lee

  “What a cruel thing is war:  to separate and destroy families and friends, and mar the purest joys and happiness God has granted us in this world; to fill our hearts with hatred instead of love for our neighbors, and to devastate the fair face of this beautiful world.”

Remember

The Forgotten War , Korea

Plato :

  “Only the dead have seen the end of war. “

Remember

Viet Nam

Jeane J. Kirkpatrick :

 “We have war when at least one of the parties to a conflict wants something more than it wants peace.”  

Remember

Urgent-fury-grenada-500-9

Operation : Urgent Fury

Jonathan Swift :

  “War! that mad game the world so loves to play. ” 

Remember

Operation Just Cause : Panama

 General William Westmoreland :

             ” War is fear cloaked in courage.”

Remember

Beirut October 23 , 1983

Dwight D. Eisenhower :

   “We are going to have peace even if we have to fight for it.”

Remember

The Gulf War : Operation Desert Storm

 Herbert V. Prochnow :

  “A visitor from Mars could easily pick out the civilized nations.  They have the best implements of war.”

Remember

Sergeant First Class Randall D. Shughart
Citation Reads: Rank and organization: Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army. Place and date: 3 October 1993, Mogadishu, Somalia. Entered service at: —– Born: Newville, Pennsylvania. Citation: Sergeant First Class Shughart, United States Army, distinguished himself by actions above and beyond the call of duty on 3 October 1993, while serving as a Sniper Team Member, United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu, Somalia. Sergeant First Class Shughart provided precision sniper fires from the lead helicopter during an assault on a building and at two helicopter crash sites, while subjected to intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fires. While providing critical suppressive fires at the second crash site, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader learned that ground forces were not immediately available to secure the site. Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader unhesitatingly volunteered to be inserted to protect the four critically wounded personnel, despite being well aware of the growing number of enemy personnel closing in on the site. After their third request to be inserted, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader received permission to perform this volunteer mission. When debris and enemy ground fires at the site caused them to abort the first attempt, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader were inserted one hundred meters south of the crash site. Equipped with only his sniper rifle and a pistol, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader, while under intense small arms fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members. Sergeant First Class Shughart pulled the pilot and the other crew members from the aircraft, establishing a perimeter which placed him and his fellow sniper in the most vulnerable position. Sergeant First Class Shughart used his long range rifle and side arm to kill an undetermined number of attackers while traveling the perimeter, protecting the downed crew. Sergeant First Class Shughart continued his protective fire until he depleted his ammunition and was fatally wounded. His actions saved the pilot’s life. Sergeant First Class Shughart’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest standards of military service and reflect great credit upon him, his unit and the United States Army.
Master Sergeant Gary I. Gordon
Citation Reads: Rank and organization: Master Sergeant, U.S. Army. Place and date: 3 October 1993, Mogadishu, Somalia. Entered service at: —– Born: Lincoln, Maine. Citation: Master Sergeant Gordon, United States Army, distinguished himself by actions above and beyond the call of duty on 3 October 1993, while serving as Sniper Team Leader, United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu, Somalia. Master Sergeant Gordon’s sniper team provided precision fires from the lead helicopter during an assault and at two helicopter crash sites, while subjected to intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fires. When Master Sergeant Gordon learned that ground forces were not immediately available to secure the second crash site, he and another sniper unhesitatingly volunteered to be inserted to protect the four critically wounded personnel, despite being well aware of the growing number of enemy personnel closing in on the site. After his third request to be inserted, Master Sergeant Gordon received permission to perform his volunteer mission. When debris and enemy ground fires at the site caused them to abort the first attempt, Master Sergeant Gordon was inserted one hundred meters south of the crash site. Equipped with only his sniper rifle and a pistol, Master Sergeant Gordon and his fellow sniper, while under intense small arms fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members. Master Sergeant Gordon immediately pulled the pilot and the other crew members from the aircraft, establishing a perimeter which placed him and his fellow sniper in the most vulnerable position. Master Sergeant Gordon used his long range rifle and side arm to kill an undetermined number of attackers until he depleted his ammunition. Master Sergeant Gordon then went back to the wreckage, recovering some of the crew’s weapons and ammunition. Despite the fact that he was critically low on ammunition, he provided some of it to the dazed pilot and then radioed for help. Master Sergeant Gordon continued to travel the perimeter, protecting the downed crew. After his team member was fatally wounded and his own rifle ammunition exhausted, Master Sergeant Gordon returned to the wreckage, recovering a rifle with the last five rounds of ammunition and gave it to the pilot with the words, “good luck.” Then, armed only with his pistol, Master Sergeant Gordon continued to fight until he was fatally wounded. His actions saved the pilot’s life. Master Sergeant Gordon’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest standards of military service and reflect great credit upon, his unit and the United States Army.

Mogadishu , Somalia October 1993

Thomas Jefferson :

  “I recoil with horror at the ferociousness of man.  Will nations never devise a more rational umpire of differences than force?  Are there no means of coercing injustice more gratifying to our nature than a waste of the blood of thousands and of the labor of millions of our fellow creatures?”

Remember

Bosnian Genocide

Dick Motta :

  “War is the only game in which it doesn’t pay to have the home-court advantage.” 

Remember

special forces on horseback

Afganistan

José Narosky :

  “In war, there are no unwounded soldiers.”

Remember

Invasion of Iraq

Henry Fosdick :

  “The tragedy of war is that it uses man’s best to do man’s worst.”  

Remember

All of the terrorist attacks over the past 30 odd years

Remember All Who Were Lost 

  They Were Lost For Us 

    PS: For those of you who have an interest in a conflict I left out please check out this timeline of US Wars created by the Smithsonian Institute . God Bless and please REMEMBER .

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