Happy Birthday , Duke

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

” On his paper route in Glendale, California, Marion and Duke would stop to visit the local firemen at the fire station. The firemen would always say “here comes Big Duke,” referring to the Airedale, “and Little Duke,” referring to Marion Morrison.

The nickname Duke stuck with Marion Morrison/John Wayne for the rest of his life.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Actor (172 titles)

1976 The Shootist
J.B. Books
1974 McQ
McQ
1973 Cahill U.S. Marshal
J. D. Cahill
1968 The Green Berets
Col. Mike Kirby
1966 Magic Mansion (TV series)
John Wayne
– Ride ’em Cowboy (1966) … John Wayne
1965 In Harm’s Way
Captain Rockwell ‘Rock’ Torrey
1962 Alcoa Premiere (TV series)
Sergeant-Umpire in Korea
– Flashing Spikes (1962) … Sergeant-Umpire in Korea (as Marion Morrison)
1960 Wagon Train (TV series)
Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman
– The Colter Craven Story (1960) … Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman (as Michael Morris)
1958 I Married a Woman
Leonard (uncredited) / John Wayne (uncredited)
1955 Screen Directors Playhouse (TV series)
Mike Cronin
1955 The Sea Chase
Captain Karl Ehrlich
1953 Trouble Along the Way
Steve Aloysius Williams
1953 Three Lives (short)
Commentator
1952 Miracle in Motion (short)
Narrator
1947 Tycoon
Johnny

1942 Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh Markham

1942 Reap the Wild Wind
Capt. Jack Stuart

1939 Allegheny Uprising
Jim Smith

1937 Idol of the Crowds
Johnny Hanson

1936 Sea Spoilers
Bob Randall

1935 Paradise Canyon
John Wyatt / John Rogers

1935 The Desert Trail
John Scott/John Jones

1933 Central Airport
Co-Pilot in Wreck (uncredited)

1932 The Big Stampede
Deputy Sheriff John Steele

1932 That’s My Boy
Football Player (uncredited)

1932 The Hurricane Express
The Air Pilot

1930 Cheer Up and Smile
Roy (uncredited)

1930 Rough Romance
Lumberjack (uncredited)

1930 Born Reckless
Extra (uncredited)

1929 The Forward Pass
Extra (uncredited)

1929 Salute
Midshipman Bill (uncredited)

1929 Words and Music
Pete Donahue (as Duke Morrison)

1929 The Black Watch
42nd Highlander (uncredited)

1929 Speakeasy
Extra (uncredited)

1928 Noah’s Ark
Flood Extra (uncredited)

1928 Hangman’s House
Horse Race Spectator (uncredited)
(uncredited)

1928 Four Sons
Officer (uncredited)

1928 Mother Machree
Extra (uncredited)

1927 The Drop Kick
Football Player (uncredited) / Extra in Stands (uncredited)

1927 Annie Laurie
Extra (uncredited)

1926 The Great K & A Train Robbery
Extra (uncredited)

1926 Bardelys the Magnificent
Guard (uncredited)

Date of Birth

26 May 1907Winterset, Iowa, USA

Date of Death

11 June 1979, Los Angeles, California, USA (lung & stomach cancer)

Birth Name

Marion Robert Morrison

Nickname

Duke
JW (family nickname)

Height

6′ 4″ (1.93 m)

Mini Biography

” John Wayne (born Marion Morrison) was the son of pharmacist Clyde Morrison and his wife Mary. Clyde developed a lung condition that required him to move his family from Iowa to the warmer climate of southern California, where they tried ranching in the Mojave Desert. Until the ranch failed, Marion and his younger brother Robert E. Morrison swam in an irrigation ditch and rode a horse to school. When the ranch failed, the family moved to Glendale, California, where Marion delivered medicines for his father, sold newspapers and had an Airedale dog named “Duke” (the source of his own nickname). He did well at school both academically and in football. When he narrowly failed admission to Annapolis he went to USC on a football scholarship 1925-7. Tom Mix got him a summer job as a prop man in exchange for football tickets. On the set he became close friends with director John Ford for whom, among others, he began doing bit parts, some billed as John Wayne. His first featured film was Men Without Women (1930). After more than 70 low-budget westerns and adventures, mostly routine, Wayne’s career was stuck in a rut until Ford cast him in Stagecoach (1939), the movie that made him a star. He appeared in nearly 250 movies, many of epic proportions. From 1942-43 he was in a radio series, “The Three Sheets to the Wind”, and in 1944 he helped found the Motion Picture Alliance for the Preservation of American Ideals, a right-wing political organization, later becoming its President. His conservative political stance was also reflected in The Alamo (1960), which he produced, directed and starred in. His patriotic stand was enshrined in The Green Berets (1968) which he co-directed and starred in. Over the years Wayne was beset with health problems. In September 1964 he had a cancerous left lung removed; in March 1978 there was heart valve replacement surgery; and in January 1979 his stomach was removed. He received the Best Actor nomination for Sands of Iwo Jima (1949) and finally got the Oscar for his role as one-eyed Rooster Cogburn in True Grit (1969). A Congressional Gold Medal was struck in his honor in 1979. He is perhaps best remembered for his parts in Ford’s cavalry trilogy – Fort Apache (1948), She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949) and Rio Grande (1950).”

 

 

 

TRIVIA

Spouses
Pilar Wayne (1 November 1954 – 11 June 1979) (his death) 3 children
Esperanza Baur (17 January 1946 – 1 November 1954) (divorced)
Josephine Alicia Saenz (24 June 1933 – 25 December 1945) (divorced) 4 children

Trade Mark

Westerns

Slow talk and distinctive, gravelly voice

War movies

Distinctive cat-like walk

His movies frequently reflected his conservative values

Often starred with Maureen O’Hara

 

 

 

 

Trivia

” Holds the record for the actor with the most leading parts – 142. In all but 11 films he played the leading part.

Ranked #16 in Empire (UK) magazine’s “The Top 100 Movie Stars of All Time” list. (October 1997)

Born at 1:00pm-CST.

Children with Pilar WayneAissa WayneEthan Wayne and Marisa Wayne.

Sons with Josephine: Michael Wayne (producer) and Patrick Wayne (actor); daughters Toni Wayne and Melinda Wayne.

Most published sources refer to Wayne’s birth name as Marion Michael Morrison. His birth certificate, however, gives his original name as Marion Robert Morrison. According to Wayne’s own statements, after the birth of his younger brother in 1911, his parents named the newborn Robert Emmett and changed Wayne’s name from Marion Robert to Marion Michael. It has also been suggested by several of his biographers that Wayne’s parents actually changed his birth name from Marion Robert to Marion Mitchell. In “Duke: The Life and Times of John Wayne” (1985), Donald Shepherd and Robert F. Slatzer state that when Wayne’s younger brother was born, “the Duke’s middle name was changed from Robert to Mitchell. . . . After he gained celebrity, Duke deliberately confused biographers and others by claiming Michael as his middle name, a claim that had no basis in fact.”

His production company, Batjac, was originally to be called Batjak, after the shipping company owned by Luther Adler‘s character in the filmWake of the Red Witch (1948). A secretary’s typo while she was drawing up the papers resulted in it being called Batjac, and Wayne, not wanting to hurt her feelings, kept her spelling of it.

In the comic “Preacher”, his ghost appears in several issues, clothed in his traditional gunfighter outfit, as a mentor to the hero of the series, Jesse Custer.

Great-uncle of boxer/actor Tommy Morrison, aka “The Duke”.

An entry in the logbook of director John Ford‘s yacht “Araner”, during a voyage along the Baja peninsula, made a reference to one of Wayne’s pranks on Ward Bond: “Caught the first mate [Wayne] pissing in [Ward] Bond’s flask this morning – must remember to give him a raise.”

He and his drinking buddy, actor Ward Bond, frequently played practical jokes on each other. In one incident, Bond bet Wayne that they could stand on opposite sides of a newspaper and Wayne wouldn’t be able to hit him. Bond set a sheet of newspaper down in a doorway, Wayne stood on one end, and Bond slammed the door in his face, shouting “Try and hit me now!” Wayne responded by sending his fist through the door, flooring Bond (and winning the bet).

His favorite drink was Sauza Commemorativo Tequila, and he often served it with ice that he had chipped from an iceberg during one of his voyages on his yacht, “The Wild Goose”.

He was offered the lead in The Dirty Dozen (1967), but went to star in and direct The Green Berets (1968) instead. The part was eventually given to Lee Marvin.

The evening before a shoot he was trying to get some sleep in a Las Vegas hotel. The suite directly below his was that of Frank Sinatra (never a good friend of Wayne), who was having a party. The noise kept Wayne awake, and each time he made a complaining phone call it quieted temporarily but each time eventually grew louder. Wayne at last appeared at Sinatra’s door and told Frank to stop the noise. A Sinatra bodyguard of Wayne’s size approached saying, “Nobody talks to Mr. Sinatra that way.” Wayne looked at the man, turned as though to leave, then backhanded the bodyguard, who fell to the floor, where Wayne knocked him out by crashing a chair on top of him. The party noise stopped.

He was a member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity.

His spoken album “America: Why I Love Her” became a surprise best-seller and Grammy nominee when it was released in 1973. Reissued on CD in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, it became a best-seller all over again.

Pictured on one of four 25¢ US commemorative postage stamps issued on Friday, March 23rd, 1990 honoring classic films released in 1939. The stamp featured Wayne as The Ringo Kid in Stagecoach (1939). The other films honored were Beau Geste (1939), The Wizard of Oz (1939), and Gone with the Wind (1939).

Upon being cast by Raoul Walsh in Fox’s The Big Trail (1930) the studio decided his name had to be changed. Walsh said he was reading a biography on General “Mad” Anthony Wayne and suggested that name. The studio liked the last name but not the first and decided on “John Wayne” as the final rendition.

He once made a cameo appearance on “The Beverly Hillbillies” (1962). In episode, “The Beverly Hillbillies: The Indians Are Coming (#5.20)”(1967). And when asked how he wanted to be paid, his answer, in return, was “Give me a fifth of bourbon – that’ll square it.”.

In 1973 he was awarded the Gold Medal from the National Football Foundation for his days playing football for Glendale High School and USC.

Arguably Wayne’s worst film, The Conqueror (1956), in which he played Genghis Kahn, was based on a script that director Dick Powell had every intention of throwing into the wastebasket. According to Powell, when he had to leave his office at RKO for a few minutes during a story conference, he returned to find a very enthused Wayne reading the script, which had been in a pile of possible scripts on Powell’s desk, and insisting that this was the movie he wanted to make. As Powell himself summed it up, “Who am I to turn down John Wayne?”.

Among his favorite leisure activities were playing bridge, poker, and chess.

He was buried at Pacific View Cemetery in Corona del Mar, California, (a community within his hometown of Newport Beach). His grave finally received a plaque in 1999.

Inducted into the Hall of Great Western Performers of the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in 1974.

Grandfather of actor Brendan Wayne.

Because his on-screen adventures involved the slaying of a slew of Mexicans, Native Americans and Japanese, he has been called a racist by his critics. They believe this was strengthened by a Playboy Magazine interview in which he suggested that blacks were not yet qualified to hold high public office because “discrimination prevented them from receiving the kind of education a political career requires”. Yet all of his three wives were of Latin descent.

He was voted the 5th Greatest Movie Star of all time by Entertainment Weekly.

Just on his sheer popularity and his prominent political activism, the Republican party in 1968 supposedly asked him to run for President of the USA, even though he had no previous political experience. He turned them down because he did not believe America would take a movie star running for the President seriously. He did however support Ronald Reagan‘s campaigns for governor of California in 1966 and 1970, as well as his bid for the Republican presidential nomination in 1976.

Wayne was initiated into DeMolay in 1924 at the Glendale Chapter in Glendale California.

Received the DeMolay Legion of Honor in 1970.

He was a Master Mason. In other words, he was a good man who became a member of the Masonic Fraternity.

Pictured on a 37¢ USA commemorative stamp in the Legends of Hollywood series, issued on Thursday, September 9th, 2004. The first-day ceremonies were held at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre in Hollywood. “

Lots More Here and Here

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday John Wayne

Trace Adkins – Arlington

 

 

 

Uploaded on Feb 26, 2009

” Official video of Trace Adkins’s Arlington from the album Songs About Me. Buy It Here:http://smarturl.it/qqqphp

“Arlington” is sung from the viewpoint of a soldier, killed in battle and buried at Arlington National Cemetery. It was inspired by United States Marine Corps Corporal Patrick Nixon, who died in battle in 2003.
Like Trace Adkins on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/traceadkins
Follow Trace Adkins on Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/TraceAdkins
Official Website: http://www.traceadkins.com/wired/
See More Videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/TraceAdki… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Meaning Of Memorial Day – “Freedom Is Never Free” – A Vietnam Veteran’s Tribute

 

 

 

 

Dr John Plays The Blues For You

 

 

 

 

Published on Nov 4, 2014

” Dr John (Mac Rebennack) demonstrates New Orleans-style blues playing exclusively for our readers. Look for him on the cover of our December 2014 issue! “

Ralphie May And The Mexicans

 

 

 

 

Federal Government, Stop Interfering With Local Police!

 

 

 

 

Published on May 22, 2015

” Zo applauds President Obama’s efforts to stop providing military surplus equipment to local law enforcement. Hear why all conservatives should cheer these efforts as an example of federalism.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ready For The Blues – 22 Vintage Blues Tracks – One Hour Of Blues

 

 

 

 

Published on Dec 29, 2014

” Ready For The Blues – 22 Vintage Blues Tracks
♫ SUBSCRIBE HERE : http://bit.ly/10VoH4l
Find the album here: http://amzn.to/1D1r3gA http://bit.ly/1xqhSo0 http://bit.ly/1Be5Grb
Join us on facebook : http://on.fb.me/1yY77w3
00:00 – Don’t Start Me Talkin’ – Sugar Blue
03:56 – Still a Fool – Muddy Waters, Little Walter
07:14 – That’s Allright – Jimmy Rogers
10:06 – My Babe – Little Walter
12:51 – Rock Me – Muddy Waters, James Cotton
16:05 – Shake the Boogie – Sonny Boy Williamson
18:53 – All Night Boogie – Howlin Wolf
21:11 – I’m a Man – Bo Diddley, Billy Boy Arnold
24:15 – I’m In the Mood – John Lee Hooker, Eddie Kirkland
27:25 – King Biscuit Stomp – Big Joe Williams
30:00 – The Blues That Made Me Drunk – Sonny Boy Williamson
33:02 – Chicago Breakdown – Doctor Ross
35:59 – Baker Shop Boogie – James Cotton, Willie Nix
38:44 – Evening Sun – Big Walter Horton, Johnny Shines
41:14 – Easy – Big Walter Horton
44:18 – Jump the Boogie – Papa Lightfoot
46:41 – Mambo Chillun – John Lee Hooker
49:36 – Standing At the Crossraods – Elmore James
52:24 – Saturday Night – Roy Brown
54:46 – Straight Alky Blues – Leroy Carr
58:09 – Chicken Hearted Woman – Clarence Samuels
01:00:50 – Sugar Mama – Pee Wee Hughes

  JazzAndBluesExperience – SUBSCRIBE HERE : http://bit.ly/10VoH4l (Re)Discover the Jazz and Blues greatest hits – JazznBluesExperience is your channel for all the best jazz and blues music. Find your favorite songs and artists and experience the best of jazz music and blues music. Subscribe for free to stay connected to our channel and easily access our video updates! – Facebook FanPage:http://www.facebook.com/JazznBluesExp… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tim Wilson Explains What His Job Is As A Comedian At The Comedy House, Columbia SC

 

 

 

 

Published on Feb 27, 2014

” Tim Wilson stand-up comedy performed at the Comedy House Theatre on Berry Hill Rd in Columbia SC. In this clip, Tim warms up the audience at the top of the show and explains to them what his job is to do that night.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOMEMADE Folding-Fin 12ga. Shotgun Rounds – Surprising Results!

 

 

 

 

Published on May 16, 2015

” I threw together some toggle bolts and faucet washers I bought at the hardware store to make simple, folding-fin projectiles. Each round took less than a minute to assemble. How will they work? Will the fins pop out? Will they fly straight through the air or tumble? Will they be accurate? IMPOSSIBLE! Did I come in under my $5/video budget? YES!

  My videos are copyrighted. Please feel free to EMBED my videos but please do not download and re-post them.
Music information: Please watch the video to see the music credits.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Siegel – Schwall Band – “The Blues Is Alright”

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on May 30, 2009

” SAMBO ARTHUR IRBY takes lead vocals on this one.CORKY SIEGEL- Harmonica/Piano/Vocals. JIM SCHWALL – Guitar/Vocals, The “Legendary” SAM LAY – Drums/Vocals, ROLLO RADFORD – Bass/Vocals, SAMBO ARTHUR IRBY- Percussion’s, Drums, Vocals”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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An Introduction To Sledge Hammer – “Gun Crazy – Memorable Moments With The Cast”

 

 

 

Uploaded on Nov 1, 2011

” 14-minute documentary celebrating the best excerpts from spoof cop show “Sledge Hammer!” (that character played by David Rasche) – about the San Francisco detective with the nihilistic and misogynistic tendencies, ably backed up by his sexy sidekick, Dory Doreau (Anne-Marie Martin). Ever the bane of Captain Trunk’s (Harrison Page) life, his humorous antics kept TV audiences of the 1980s entertained and enthralled for two whole series. Move over, ‘Dirty Harry’ Callahan…..

If you’ve never discovered Inspector Hammer before, here are the perfect examples of his hilarious adventures…..

Written and produced by Alan Spencer. Copyright exists.

(The whole “Sledge Hammer!” experience is available on DVD at http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/offer-list…) “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Study: 82% Of People 60 & Older Working Or Expect To Work Past 65 – America’s Newsroom

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Fats Waller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” Not only was Fats Waller one of the greatest pianists jazz has ever known, he was also one of its most exuberantly funny entertainers — and as so often happens, one facet tends to obscure the other. His extraordinarily light and flexible touch belied his ample physical girth; he could swing as hard as any pianist alive or dead in his classic James P. Johnson-derived stride manner, with a powerful left hand delivering the octaves and tenths in a tireless, rapid, seamless stream. Waller also pioneered the use of the pipe organ and Hammond organ in jazz — he called the pipe organ the “God box” — adapting his irresistible sense of swing to the pedals and a staccato right hand while making imaginative changes of the registration. As a composer and improviser, his melodic invention rarely flagged, and he contributed fistfuls of joyous yet paradoxically winsome songs like “Honeysuckle Rose,” “Ain’t Misbehavin,'” “Keepin’ Out of Mischief Now,” “Blue Turning Grey Over You” and the extraordinary “Jitterbug Waltz” to the jazz repertoire.

  During his lifetime and afterwards, though, Fats Waller was best known to the world for his outsized comic personality and sly vocals, where he would send up trashy tunes that Victor Records made him record with his nifty combo, Fats Waller & His Rhythm. Yet on virtually any of his records, whether the song is an evergreen standard or the most trite bit of doggerel that a Tin Pan Alley hack could serve up, you will hear a winning combination of good knockabout humor, foot-tapping rhythm and fantastic piano playing. Today, almost all of Fats Waller‘s studio recordings can be found on RCA’s on-again-off-again series The Complete Fats Waller, which commenced on LPs in 1975 and was still in progress during the 1990s.” Continue reading

Discography

More videos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mister Roberts – Firecracker

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Jul 15, 2010

” And to a great American,
Frank Thurlowe Pulver…soldier, statesman, scientist.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another Clinton Tragedy: Elian Gonzalez All Grown Up – PJTV

 

 

 

 

Published on May 20, 2015

” The kid forcibly deported at gunpoint, Elian Gonzalez, has now grown up. And, if only the Cuban govt. would let him go online, he’d tell you about it… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newport Folk Festival

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Aug 29, 2010

” Some rare footage of two great Mississippi blues men, the fiery slide of Fred McDowell and the sweet and mellow John Hurt with his beautiful finger picking style, only glimpses that leave you wanting a whole lot more. Plus some of the young white guys who were making great music at the time, John Koerner and the Paul Butterfield band with Paul on harp and Mike Bloomfield on guitar.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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George Carlin – Euphemisms

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published on Dec 29, 2012

” In the age when torture has become “enhanced interrogation techniques”; when the rich are “job creators”; when murdered children are “collateral damage”; it is good to remember these brilliant words from the late, great, George Carlin.

  It is also good to remember that the phrase “Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder” has now been officially changed in American English to “PTSD”, a totally lifeless non-threatening acronym, totally devoid of even pity and with an almost whiny feel to it.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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John Stossel – Another Government Housing Bubble

 

 

 

 

Published on May 19, 2015

” Former Fannie Mae Chief Credit Officer Ed Pinto and former FHA Commissioner David Stevens join John to discuss current housing policies. http://www.LibertyPen.com “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday John Stuart Mill

 

 

Early Years

” Under the tutelage of his imposing father, himself a historian and economist, John Stuart Mill began his intellectual journey at an early age, starting his study of Greek at the age of three and Latin at eight. Mill’s father was a proponent of Jeremy Bentham’s philosophy of utilitarianism, and John Stuart Mill began embracing it himself in his middle teens.

  Born in 1806, John Stuart Mill was the eldest son of James Mill and Harriet Barrow (whose influence on Mill was vastly overshadowed by that of his father). A struggling man of letters, James Mill wrote History of British India (1818), and the work landed him a coveted position in the East India Company, where he rose to the post of chief examiner. When not carrying out his administrative duties, James Mill spent considerable time educating his son John, who began to learn Greek at age three and Latin at age eight. By the age of 14, John was extremely well versed in the Greek and Latin classics; had studied world history, logic and mathematics; and had mastered the basics of economic theory, all of which was part of his father’s plan to make John Stuart Mill a young proponent of the views of the philosophical radicals.

  By his late teens, Mill spent many hours editing Jeremy Bentham’s manuscripts, and he threw himself into the work of the philosophic radicals (still guided by his father). He also founded a number of intellectual societies and began to contribute to periodicals, including the Westminster Review (which was founded by Bentham and James Mill). In 1823, his father secured him a junior position in the East India Company, and he, like his father before him, rose in the ranks, eventually taking his father’s position of chief examiner.”

 

 

 

 

Career

 

” It was not until 1843 that John Stuart Mill became known as a philosopher. In this same year he published System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive, his most systematic work.

Whatever is known to us by consciousness, is known beyond possibility of question. What one sees or feels, whether bodily or mentally, one cannot but be sure that one sees or feels. No science is required for the purpose of establishing such truths; no rules of art can render our knowledge of them more certain than it is in itself. There is no logic for this portion of our knowledge. But we may fancy that we see or feel what we in reality infer.

  Attacking “intuitionist” philosophy, he argues in favour of logic as the most adequate method of proof. Despite the fact that truth “may seem to be apprehended intuitively,” Mill stresses the fact that, “it has long been ascertained that what is perceived by the eye, is at most nothing more than a variously colored surface.” It thus the object of logic to “distinguish between things proved and things not proved, between what is worthy and what is unworthy of belief.”

  In 1848, Mill published Principles of Political Economy, which soon became the most important text of his time. The book examines the conditions of production, namely labour and nature. Following Ricardo and Malthus, he emphasizes the possibility of change and social improvement and examines environmental protection needs. In order for these to be obtained, he considers a limitation of both economic growth and population growth, as the polis itself is indispensable. Furthermore, Mill argued in favour of worker-owned cooperatives, which clearly reflect his views.

  On Liberty, published in 1859, caused the greatest controversy of John Stuart Mill’s career and has since become a classic of liberal thought. Written and developed in close collaboration with his wife, Harriet Taylor, Mill examines the nature of power and argues for an absolute freedom of thought and speech. For Mill it is only through such “freedom” that human progress can be attained and preserved. As he states: “The subject of this Essay is not the so-called Liberty of the Will, […] but Civil, or Social Liberty: the nature and limits of the power which can be legitimately exercised by society over the individual.” He thus asserts a„very simple principle“: “that the sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively, in interfering with the liberty of action of any of their number, is self-protection. That the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others[…] The only part of the conduct of any one, for which he is amenable to society, is that which concerns others. In the part which merely concerns himself, his independence is, of right, absolute. Over himself, over his own body and mind, the individual is sovereign.” “

 

 

 

File:J S Mill and H Taylor.jpg

 

 

 

Philosophy

 

 

Liberty

 

” John Stuart Mill’s view on liberty, which was influenced by Joseph Priestley and Josiah Warren, is that the individual ought to be free to do as he wishes unless he harms others. Individuals are rational enough to make decisions about their good being and choose any religion they want to. Government should interfere when it is for the protection of society. Mill explains,

“The sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively, in interfering with the liberty of action of any of their number, is self-protection. That the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others. His own good, either physical or moral, is not sufficient warrant. He cannot rightfully be compelled to do or forbear because it will be better for him to do so, because it will make him happier, because, in the opinion of others, to do so would be wise, or even right…The only part of the conduct of anyone, for which he is amenable to society, is that which concerns others. In the part which merely concerns him, his independence is, of right, absolute. Over himself, over his own body and mind, the individual is sovereign.”

 

 

Freedom of speech 

 

An influential advocate of freedom of speech, Mill objected to censorship. He says:

I choose, by preference the cases which are least favourable to me – In which the argument opposing freedom of opinion, both on truth and that of utility, is considered the strongest. Let the opinions impugned be the belief of God and in a future state, or any of the commonly received doctrines of morality… But I must be permitted to observe that it is not the feeling sure of a doctrine (be it what it may) which I call an assumption of infallibility. It is the undertaking to decide that question for others, without allowing them to hear what can be said on the contrary side. And I denounce and reprobate this pretension not the less if it is put forth on the side of my most solemn convictions. However, positive anyone’s persuasion may be, not only of the faculty but of the pernicious consequences, but (to adopt expressions which I altogether condemn) the immorality and impiety of opinion. – yet if, in pursuance of that private judgement, though backed by the public judgement of his country or contemporaries, he prevents the opinion from being heard in its defence, he assumes infallibility. And so far from the assumption being less objectionable or less dangerous because the opinion is called immoral or impious, this is the case of all others in which it is most fatal. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Stuart Mill Major Publications

 

“Two Letters on the Measure of Value” 1822 “The Traveller”
“Questions of Population” 1823 “Black Dwarf”
“War Expenditure” 1824 Westminster Review
“Quarterly Review – Political Economy” 1825 Westminster Review
“Review of Miss Martineau’s Tales” 1830 Examiner
“The Spirit of the Age” 1831 Examiner
“Use and Abuse of Political Terms” 1832  
“What is Poetry” 1833, 1859  
“Rationale of Representation” 1835  
“De Tocqueville on Democracy in America [i]” 1835  
“State of Society In America” 1836  
“Civilization” 1836  
“Essay on Bentham” 1838  
“Essay on Coleridge” 1840  
“Essays On Government” 1840  
“De Tocqueville on Democracy in America [ii]” 1840  
A System of Logic 1843  
Essays on Some Unsettled Questions of Political Economy 1844  
“Claims of Labour” 1845 Edinburgh Review
The Principles of Political Economy: with some of their applications to social philosophy 1848  
“The Negro Question” 1850 Fraser’s Magazine
“Reform of the Civil Service” 1854  
Dissertations and Discussions 1859  
A Few Words on Non-intervention 1859  
On Liberty 1859  
‘Thoughts on Parliamentary Reform 1859  
Considerations on Representative Government 1861  
“Centralisation” 1862 Edinburgh Review
“The Contest in America” 1862 Harper’s Magazine
Utilitarianism 1863  
An Examination of Sir William Hamilton‘s Philosophy 1865  
Auguste Comte and Positivism 1865  
Inaugural Address at St. Andrews – Rectorial Inaugural Address at the University of St. Andrews, concerning the value of culture 1867  
“Speech In Favor of Capital Punishment” 1868  
England and Ireland 1868  
“Thornton on Labor and its Claims” 1869 Fortnightly Review
The Subjection of Women 1869  
Chapters and Speeches on the Irish Land Question 1870  
On Nature 1874  
Autobiography of John Stuart Mill 1873  
Three Essays on Religion 1874  
On Social Freedom: or the Necessary Limits of Individual Freedom Arising Out of the Conditions of Our Social Life 1907 “Oxford and Cambridge Review”
“Notes on N.W. Senior’s Political Economy” 1945 Economica

 

 

 

 

Further Reading & Resources

 

John Stuart Mill (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

Mill, John Stuart [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]

John Stuart Mill – Philosophy Pages

John Stuart Mill – Utilitarianism

John Stuart Mill : Biography – Spartacus Educational

John Stuart Mill – The ultimate collection of online works, papers …

John Stuart Mill – Papers and essays on his philosophy

John Stuart Mill: On Liberty

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Happy Birthday Carlos Hathcock

 

 

 

 

The Story of Legendary Sniper Carlos Hathcock

 

 

” When retired Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant Carlos Hathcock II died at the age of 57 on Feb. 26, 1999, his legend had long since chiseled its way into the pantheon of Marine Corps history.

  He’d served almost 20 years in the Corps, including two tours as a sniper during the Vietnam War. A killer more deadly and silent than Hathcock finally had him in the cross hairs and pulled the trigger, ending his extraordinary life.

  The medical term for that stealthy, relentless force is multiple sclerosis, a slow, progressive terminal malady that attacks the central nervous system. MS can cause paralysis, spasms and the loss of coordination and muscle control.”

 

 

Then Cpl. Carlos Hathcock (far left) being awarded the 1965 Wimbledon Cup.
This trophy is given to the winner of the 1000 yard shooting match.

 

 

Carlos Hathcock (1942 – 1999)

 

” was a US Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant who served as a sniper in the Vietnam War. With 93 confirmed kills, he was the 4th most effective sniper in American history, trailing behind Adelbert F Waldron (109), Charles Mawhinney (103), and Eric R England (98). His exploits, both as a courageous soldier and a sniper, made him a legend in the Marine Corps. Hathcock became a major developer of the United States Marine Corps Sniper training program. Not only was Carlos extremely lethal as a sniper, but he was also a brave marine; he was awarded the Silver Star for his act in 1969 of saving the lives of seven fellow Marines after the amphibious tractor on which they were riding struck a mine. Hathcock was knocked unconscious, but awoke in time to race back through the flames to save his comrades.


  Carlos Hathcock was born in Little Rock, Arkansas, on May 20, 1942. Since his parents had separated, he lived with his grandmother in the country where he grew up. At a young age, Carlos learned to use a rifle, which his father had brought from Europe after World War II. Then, he would hunt wild animals to help feed his poor family.In 1959, at the age of 17, Carlos Hathcock joined the Marine Corps. Before being shipped to Vietnam, he showed his natural skills as a marksman on the rifle range at Camp Pendleton where he was undergoing recruit training, winning the Pacific Division rifle championship while he was deployed in Hawaii as a member of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines. In 1966, he was sent to Vietnam and became a sniper after Captain Edward J. Land Jr. had pushed the Marines into raising snipers in every platoon.” ” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interview Parts 1-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Videos

 

 

Further Reading

 

Bob Tuley – Carlos Hathcock Sniper Biography

Carlos Norman “Gunny” Hathcock II (1942–1999) – Encyclopedia …

Carlos Hathcock – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Carlos Hathcock Biography | WordExplorer.com

Carlos Hathcock – Gunsopedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daily Comedy 5.19.15

Jonathan Winters – The Best Of It’s A Mad Mad Mad World

 

 

 

 

Published on Apr 12, 2013

” A humble tribute to the comic genius of the late Mr. Winters.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yq1xNc…
Mount Yale, a Colorado 14er that became my own personal Mad World.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Rand Paul & Scott Walker Lead In NH

 

 

 

 

Published on May 18, 2015

” A new poll in New Hampshire puts Rand Paul and Scott Walker in first place among GOP candidates in the Granite State. Hillary Clinton still leads among Democrats, but she is showing some weakness. Hear why.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Jimmy Thackery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” Singer, songwriter, and guitar virtuoso Jimmy Thackery carved an enviable niche for himself in the world of electric blues. Known for his gritty, blue-collar approach and marathon live shows, Thackery was for many years part of the Nighthawks, one of the hardest-working blues bar bands in North America. By the late ’80s, he was touring and recording under his own name, and finding widespread acceptance on the festival circuit. His hard-edged, tough-as-nails approach to guitar playing and his trio’s driving rhythm section holds appeal for fans of both the straight-ahead blues of Muddy Waters and the roots rock of Bruce Springsteen and Joe Grushecky. Like the Nighthawks and Grushecky‘s Houserockers, much of the material Thackery performs can safely be called blues or blues-rock. Hardcore blues like “It’s My Own Fault” and popular blues-rock chestnuts like “Red House” from Jimi Hendrix are fair game for Thackery & His Drivers, which included Michael Patrick on bass and Mark Stutso on drums and vocals.

  Born in Pittsburgh, Thackery was raised in Washington, D.C. In high school, he played in a band with Bonnie Raitt‘s brother, David, who exposed him to the music of Buddy Guy; Thackery saw both Guy and Jimi Hendrix perform in Washington, D.C. Thackery joined the Nighthawks in 1974, after being introduced to harmonica man Mark Wenner by fellow guitarist Bobby Radcliff, who was then based in D.C. Thackery recorded more than 20 albums with the Nighthawks and toured the U.S., Canada, Europe, and Japan. He left the band in 1987 and struck out on his own, needing a break from the Nighthawks‘ 300-nights-a-year tour schedule. ” Continue reading

Discography

More videos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Daily Comedy 5.18.15

Eddie Murphy Impersonates James Brown

 

 

 

 

Published on Mar 6, 2012

” Eddie Murphy does a hilarious impression of James Brown in his movie Delirious (1982) “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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