3D Printed Gun Parts Hit Road Blocks (and Why it Matters)

 

 

 

 

” As states like Colorado try to make manufacturing some magazines illegal, than legality must be a concern. But regulation is going to be complicated, if not impossible, when people begin printing magazines at home.

But it goes beyond legislation.  After Sandy Hook, many people and corporate entities are distancing themselves from guns. There is the proposed sale of Freedom Group. Even firearms retailers pulled back from controversial guns.

Even Ebay is getting (more) skittish.  They’re paranoid about the mention of “Assault Weapons” in any description.  You can still sell a part that might fit more than one gun, but not if you mention assault weapons, or any of those taboo guns associated with assaults.  Theirpolicy page now reads: “Accessories that fit a variety of different weapons, including assault weapons [can be posted]. But in your listing, you can’t mention any assault weapon compatibility.”

And Thingiverse, the online repository of printable projects associated with MakerBot printers, recently pulled the plans for an AR-15 lower, citing a violation of their service terms (you’re not allowed to store files that can be used to make weapons).

This has to be an expected setback for HaveBlue (aka Michael Guslick), the designer that posted the AR-15 plans.  Similar things are happening to others.  Cody Wilson and the team at Defense Distributed, for example, now seem to be spearheading the printed firearms movement.  They have an SLA Printed 30 round AR magazine.  The only thing that isn’t printed is the mainspring.”