National Police Misconduct NewsFeed Daily Recap 04.24.15

 

 

National Police Misconduct Reporting Project

 

 

 

” Here are the nine reports of police misconduct tracked for Friday, April 24, 2015:

  • Dallas, Texas: A grand jury declined to indict two officers who fatally shot 38-year-old Jason Harrison. ow.ly/M3PzB
  • Palm Beach County, Florida: Recently released dashcam video contradicts statement by deputy who had been cleared in the 2013 shooting of unarmed black man. ow.ly/M3QbX
  • Latimer County, Oklahoma: A now-former deputy was arrested for stealing drug evidence. The drugs were discovered in his patrol vehicle during a routine cleaning. ow.ly/M3Wno
  • Oakland, California: The city paid $275,000 to two innocent teens. One of the teens was shot in the jaw by a police officer because he was mistaken for robbery suspect, the other was present at the time of the shooting. The officer who shot at the boys was, at the time, a field training officer. He claimed the victim made “a sweeping motion toward his waistband.”  http://bit.ly/1DArdJO
  • Coral Springs, Florida: An officer was arrested for domestic battery. He allegedly dragged his wife out of a car and drove off with their one-year-old son ow.ly/M4z5S
  • Update: Inkster, Michigan (First reported 03-30-15): An officer was fired and charged with assault after violent arrest video was released. The police chief resigned in the wake of the incident. ow.ly/M4Dyc
  • Dallas, Texas: Two officers were fired for maintaining inappropriate personal relationships. One officer had a relationship with someone in their Explorers program. The other had a relationship “with a person of immoral character.” ow.ly/M4Gcd
  • Mt. Juliet, Tennessee: An officer was suspended for falsifying time cards. ow.ly/M4Ihq
  • Greenwood, Mississippi: An officer was suspended after arresting activist who is also a candidate for lieutenant governor. The activist was recording a traffic stop. ow.ly/M51KU

 

 

 

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