National Police Misconduct NewsFeed Daily Recap 04.29.15

 

 

National Police Misconduct Reporting Project

 

 

 

” Here are the eight reports of police misconduct tracked for Wednesday, April 29, 2015:

  • Update: Kirtland Hills, Ohio (First reported 10-14-14): The now-former police chief was sentenced to two years in prison for fraud and tampering charges. According to the news report, “Prosecutors say he defrauded the village out of at least $80,000 by making unauthorized purchases of clothing, tools and goods for his own use.”  http://ow.ly/MfzJn
  • Update: Miami-Dade, Florida (First reported 08-06-14): A now-former officer pled guilty to aiding and abetting marijuana distribution. He faces a five-year mandatory minimum sentence for tipping off marijuana growers to when the police were investigating them and how to avoid capture. http://ow.ly/MfOqr
  • Sweetwater, Florida: An officer was arrested and suspended for buying cocaine. http://ow.ly/Mg26N
  • Phoenix, Arizona: The department released a video that led to the firing of a detective. The now-former detective knocked out an 18-year-old man’s teeth after he surrendered. http://ow.ly/Mg2Jz
  • Allen County, Ohio: A now-retired sergeant was charged with 112 counts related to 35 thefts from the evidence room. The alleged thefts occurred while he was employed with the department. http://ow.ly/Mg4Nm
  • Sidney, Nebraska: The chief was charged with obstructing government operations by a state attorney. Allegedly he did not pursue a criminal case that he should have. ow.ly/MiAJr
  • New Orleans, Louisiana: An officer was fired after a lengthy investigation. He fought a man after a fender bender in 2013 and though he was acquitted of criminal charges, his position was terminated after a disciplinary review. http://ow.ly/MiCPu
  • Update: Prescott Valley, Arizona (First reported 01-20-15): A now-former commander was sentenced to three years of probation. He pled guilty to stealing drugs from the evidence room. ow.ly/MiHhQ
 
 

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