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Category: Cyber Crime


Report Says Former IRS Employees–Think Lois Lerner–Can Still Peruse Your Tax Returns

 

 

 

” Could Lois Lerner still take a look at your tax returns on IRS computers? It sounds preposterous, but a new watchdog report says former IRS employees still have access to IRS computer systems long after they have no official business with the information. The report is by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, an independent, nonpartisan agency that works for Congress. The GAO investigates how the federal government spends taxpayer dollars. In the case of IRS security, the report says not well.

  This report cites significant deficiencies in the security of IRS financial reporting systems. Millions of Americans who are legally required to file taxes are fearful about fraud. The report says the IRS needs to continue improving controls over financial and taxpayer data. In the case of former IRS workers with continuing access to IRS data systems, they need to be cut off.”

 

Forbes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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How Google Skewed Search Results

 

 

 

 

” A previously undisclosed report by staffers at the Federal Trade Commission reveals new details about how Google Inc. manipulated search results to favor its own services over rivals’, even when they weren’t most relevant for users.

  In a lengthy investigation, staffers in the FTC’s bureau of competition found evidence that Google boosted its own services for shopping, travel and local businesses by altering its ranking criteria and “scraping” content from other sites. It also deliberately demoted rivals.

The report’s insight into Google’s business practices is still relevant as Google expands its own offerings. Just this month, it launched a search tool for car-insurance quotes, which competes with similar tools offered by Allstate Corp.’s Esurance, among others. It has beefed up hotel listings that compete with TripAdvisor Inc. and Expedia Inc.”

 

 

    Gee , is anyone really surprised that Google manipulates the search results of it’s users ? If ever there was a monopoly that could use a little trust-busting … and remember , this is coming from the corporation that wants to rank it’s search results by “truthiness” …  Continue reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cybergeddon: Why The Internet Could Be The Next “Failed State”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” In the New York City of the late 1970s, things looked bad. The city government was bankrupt, urban blight was rampant, and crime was high. But people still went to the city every day because that was where everything was happening. And despite the foreboding feelings hanging over New York at the time, the vast majority of those people had at most minor brushes with crime.

  Today, we all dabble in some place that looks a lot like 1970s New York City—the Internet. (For those needing a more recent simile, think the Baltimore of The Wire). Low-level crime remains rampant, while increasingly sophisticated crime syndicates go after big scores. There is a cacophony of hateful speech, vice of every kind (see Rule 34), and policemen of various sorts trying to keep a lid on all of it—or at least, trying to keep the chaos away from most law-abiding citizens. But people still use the Internet every day, though the ones who consider themselves “street smart” do so with varying levels of defenses installed. Things sort of work.

  Just like 1970s New York, however, there’s a pervasive feeling that everything could go completely to hell with the slightest push—into a place to be escaped from with the aid of a digital Snake Plissken. In other words, the Internet might soon look less like 1970s New York and more like 1990s Mogadishu: warring factions destroying the most fundamental of services, “security zones” reducing or eliminating free movement, and security costs making it prohibitive for anyone but the most well-funded operations to do business without becoming a “soft target” for political or economic gain.

  That day is not yet nigh, but logic suggests the status quo can’t continue forever. The recent rash of major breaches of corporate networks, including the theft of personal information from the health insurer Anthem and the theft of as much as a billion dollars from over 100 banks are symptoms of a much larger trend of cybercrime and espionage. And while the issue has been once again raised to national importance by the White House, it could be argued that governments have done more to exacerbate the problem than address it. Fears of digital warfare and crime are shifting budget priorities, funding the rapid expansion of the security industry and being used as a reason for proposals for new laws and policy that could reshape the Internet.

“ If we think our kids and grandkids are going to have as awesome and free an Internet as the one we have, we really have to look at why we think that,” Jason Healey, director of the Cyber Statecraft Initiative at the Atlantic Council of the United States, told Ars.”

 

Read the whole thing at ArsTechnica

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DDoS Attacks Against Governments More Powerful And Popular Than Ever

 

 

 

” When the protesters hit the streets, expect DDoS attacks to hit the Web. 

  Distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks are being used against government targets more than ever before, according to new research from Internet infrastructure firm Verisign. The attacks are increasingly powerful, cheap, and easy to deploy.

  DDoS attacks work by flooding a target—a bank, for instance, or a popular website—with data in order to make it crash or unusable for users. It’s not only an easy-to-use, cheap, and effective weapon for hackers, it’s also a goldmine for security firms paid to defend against the attacks.

  DDoS attacks against public-sector targets grew to account for 15 percent of all attacks recorded by the company at the end of 2014. The average size of attacks grew in size by 245 percent, Verisign found.

  DDoS-for-hire services can cost as little as $2 per hour, delivering an easy-to-use but potentially powerful punch to any Internet-connected devices on earth. 

  The DDoS defense market—where Verisign is a major player—is projected to hit $1.6 billion within two years.”

 

Daily Dot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This Malware Can Hijack A Drone In Seconds

 

 

 

 

 

” If the White House wants to keep drones off the lawn, they might want to give Rahul Sasi a call. He’s developing malware that can hijack a drone in just a few short seconds.

  He calls his malware (fittingly enough) Maldrone, and it doesn’t gain control over its victims the way that previously-demonstrated attacks do. Most others have leveraged the APIs — like the one provided by Parrot for developers who want to tinker with their AR Drones — to do the hijacking.

  But a “Parrot drone is a toy,” Rahul says, and he went to work on an attack that was a bit more generic, able to wreak havoc on multitudes of drones regardless of whether or not the manufacturer exposes anything via an API. Maldrone is the result, and it’s impressive even though it’s very much a work in progress.”

 

    Read more about Maldrone here . In other drone news , DJI has upgraded their firmware creating a 15.5 mile radius no-fly zone around Washington DC .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War III Scares Posted By Hacked NY Post, UPI Twitter Feeds

 

 

 

 

 

” Social media watchers on Friday were treated to shocking and dramatic global developments courtesy of the New York Post and United Press International: World War III declared by the Pope! China and the United States engaged in a serious military battle!

  Thankfully for the international community, it was just (another) case of hacked Twitter accounts going haywire.”

 

 

upi-twitter-screenshot.png

 

 

” Both UPI and the New York Post had their Twitter feeds hijacked at around 1 p.m. on Friday, as President Barack Obama and UK Prime Minister David Cameron addressed the media on cyber security and the need to beef up online defenses.”

 

Read more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sharyl Attkisson Sues Administration Over Computer Hacking

 

 

 

 

” Former CBS News correspondent Sharyl Attkisson has sued the Justice Department over the hacking of her computers, officially accusing the Obama administration of illegal surveillance while she was reporting on administration scandals. 

  In a series of legal filings that seek $35 million in damages, Attkisson alleges that three separate computer forensic exams showed that hackers used sophisticated methods to surreptitiously monitor her work between 2011 and 2013. 

” I just think it’s important to send a message that people shouldn’t be victimized and throw up their hands and think there’s nothing they can do and they’re powerless,” Attkisson said in an interview. 

  The department has steadfastly denied any involvement in the hacking, saying in a 2013 statement: “To our knowledge, the Justice Department has never compromised Ms. Attkisson’s computers, or otherwise sought any information from or concerning any telephone, computer, or other media device she may own or use.” “

 

Fox News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hackers Released An Enormous Cache Of 13,000 Passwords And Credit Cards

 

 

 

 

 

” On Friday, a group claiming affiliation with the loose hacker collective Anonymous released a document containing approximately 13,000 username-and-password combinations along with credit card numbers and expiration dates.

  The stolen personal information was released in a massive text file posted the document sharing site Ghostbin. The compromised sites run the gamut from pornography to gaming to online shopping. 

  Some of the most significant leaks came from online video gaming networks like Xbox Live, the Sony PlayStation Network, and Twitch.tv. There was information from accounts at Walmart, Amazon, and Hulu Plus, as well as keys to computer games like The Sims 3 and Dragon Age: Origins, and a whole lot of porn sites.

  Some Anonymous members have pushed back on the assertion that this leak had anything to do with the hacktivist group. Anonymous has no official leadership or centralized organizational structure; instead, it functions as a loose affiliation of computer hackers that join together in support of various causes, ranging from battles with the Church of Scientology to doxing members of the KKK. If hackers branding themselves as Anonymous carry out a particular action, it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s any of the same people who have carried out any other Anonymous-branded action.

  Judging from the document, the following sites were compromised or, at the very least, had some of their user data stolen—possibly through malware installed onto users’ personal devices or other nefarious methods.

 

  • Amazon
  • Walmart
  • PlayStation Network
  • Xbox Live
  • Twitch.tv
  • Origin.com
  • Hulu Plus
  • Dell
  • Brazzers
  • lKnowThatGirl
  • Mofos
  • DigitalPlayground
  • Wicked
  • Twistys
  • Fantyasyhd
  • Puremature
  • Tiny4k
  • MotherFuckerXxx
  • Playboy
  • CastingCouchX
  • BangBros
  • POVD
  • BabesNetwork
  • ArtisticAddiction
  • X-art
  • Shutterstock
  • Platinumclub.com
  • AprilJordan.com
  • DareDorm
  • PrettyPetites
  • NaughtyAmerica
  • PornAccess
  • RookieBabe
  • GFMembersPass
  • HungarianHoneys
  • PleaseBangMyWife “

 

Daily Dot has more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No, North Korea Didn’t Hack Sony

 

 

 

 

 

” The FBI and the President may claim that the Hermit Kingdom is to blame for the most high-profile network breach in forever. But almost all signs point in another direction.
  So, “The Interview” is to be released after all.

  The news that the satirical movie—which revolves around a plot to murder Kim Jong-Un—will have a Christmas Day release as planned, will prompt renewed scrutiny of whether, as the US authorities have officially claimed, the cyber attack on Sony really was the work of an elite group of North Korean government hackers.

  All the evidence leads me to believe that the great Sony Pictures hack of 2014 is far more likely to be the work of one disgruntled employee facing a pink slip.

  I may be biased, but, as the director of security operations for DEF CON, the world’s largest hacker conference, and the principal security researcher for the world’s leading mobile security company, Cloudflare, I think I am worth hearing out. “

 

 

Read more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sony Hackers Mock FBI: ‘You Are An Idiot’

 

 

 

 

 

 

” The group behind the devastating hacking attack on Sony has apparently posted a message mocking the FBI.

” The result of investigation by FBI is so excellent that you might have seen what we were doing with your own eyes,” the message posted on the file-sharing website Pastebin by a group calling itself GOP (Guardians of Peace) said.

” We congratulate you success. FBI is the BEST in the world.”

  The US federal agency has named North Korea as the force behind the attack on Sony, which led the company to withdraw the comedy The Interview from its Christmas Day release.”

 

Yahoo News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 “President Obama Piles On And Blames Sony” Regarding Sony Hack Attack

 

 

 

Cellphone Privacy Is Shaky, Researchers Say

 

 

 

” German researchers have discovered security flaws that could let hackers, spies, and criminals listen to private phone calls and intercept text messages on a potentially massive scale — even when cellular networks are using the most advanced encryption available.

  The flaws, to be reported at a hacker conference in Hamburg this month, are the latest evidence of widespread insecurity on SS7, the global network that allows the world’s cellular carriers to route calls, texts, and other data to one another. Experts say it’s increasingly clear that SS7, designed in the 1980s, is riddled with serious vulnerabilities.

  The flaws discovered by the Germans are actually functions built into SS7 for other purposes, such as keeping calls connected as users speed down highways, switching from cell tower to cell tower. Hackers can repurpose them because of the lax security on the network.”

 

Read more at the Boston Globe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Pirate Bay Raided By Police, Site Down

 

 

 

 

 

” Swedish police have reportedly raided The Pirate Bay. The portal has been down for several hours. The site has long hidden behind the relatively lax laws of Sweden, but it appears it’s exhausted the leniency.

  The embattled torrent tracker went down this morning, and Swedish Police confirmed to TorrentFreak that some servers were seized in connection with a broad intellectual property operation of some kind.

  There has been a crackdown on a server room in Greater Stockholm. This is in connection with violations of copyright law,” read a statement from Paul Pintér, police national coordinator for IP enforcement.

According to Metro in Sweden (bastardized translation by Google):

  The effort was initiated by Frederick Ingblad, one of Sweden’s special prosecutors file sharing. He confirms that the raid took place in the Stockholm area, on Tuesday morning, without specifying the site further.

– There were a number of police officers and Digital forensics there.This took place during the morning and until the afternoon. And there were several servers and computers seized, but I would not say exactly how many, says Fredrik Ingblad.

  So while we don’t have a definite confirmation, it’s probably fair to draw a line between the intellectual property operation and the outage. TorrentFreak notes that several other trackers like EZTV are down. The Pirate Bay forum at Suprbay.org is also down.

  Earlier this year it was reported that The Pirate Bay set up a network of virtual servers to keep the tracker up and running in the case of a raid but that obviously didn’t work. “

Gizmodo has the story

Anonymous Hacking Attack Lands British Rock Guitarist In Jail

 

 

 

” Geoffrey “Jake” Commander, a rock guitarist who has played with the Electric Light Orchestra, George Harrison and Elton John, among others, walked unnoticed through the halls of the U.S. District Court in Alexandria early Friday afternoon.

  Having been found indigent by a federal judge, the 66-year-old was accompanied by a court-appointed lawyer. Nearly four years to the day earlier, as his attorney put it, Commander, “like the crew of Gilligan’s Island, went on a three-hour tour that led to disastrous consequences.”

  He was one of 13 people charged last year as members of the underground group Anonymous in attacks against financial institutions and other companies. Initially, he faced up to 10 years in federal prison.

  Later, though, the case was quietly downgraded to a misdemeanor. On Friday, Commander was sentenced to 10 days in the Alexandria jail. With credit for one day served already after his arrest, he’ll be out early next week.

  Records hardly depict Commander as a cybercrime mastermind as much as an online surfer who stumbled his way into an unfamiliar chat room. Once there, in what he later would call an “impulsive, spurious and foolish” decision, he clicked on a link that would lead him years later right into the crosshairs of the Justice Department. “

 

Washington Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Government Employees Cause Nearly 60% Of Public Sector Cyber Incidents

 

Fed Cyber Attacks

 

 

” About 58 percent of cyber incidents reported in the public sector were caused by government employees, according to an annual data breach report compiled by Verizon. The findings — stripped of identifying information — do not mention ex-contractor Edward Snowden’s mammoth leak of national secrets. 

  Even if Snowden’s leaks had been included in the tally of results attributed to insider threats, they wouldn’t have made much of a dent. 

” If that were recorded in here, that would be a single event,” said Jay Jacobs, a Verizon senior analyst and co-author of the report. 

  Most (34 percent) of the insider incidents in the global public sector during the past three years were miscellaneous errors such as emailing documents to the wrong person. Unapproved or malicious use of data by public servants accounted for 24 percent of reported incidents.

  Surprisingly, cyberspying and intrusions via security holes in websites, known to be big problems in government, represented less than 1 percent of the situations reported. “

 

NextGov has more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sony Struggles To Fight #GOP Hackers Who Claim Stolen Data Includes Stars’ IDs, Budget And Contract Figures

 

 

 

 

” The Guardians of Peace group, which says it is responsible for Monday’s attack, releases list of files it says it has found.

  The situation at Sony Pictures Entertainment is more dire than the studio has allowed to be known, as the fifth day of hackers taking down the studio’s computer system continues though a threat to release private information has not materialized, TheWrap has learned.

  The studio has taken as much of its functions offline as possible, and managed to get payroll out as well as sustain DVD sales for titles like “Spider-Man” on the all-important Black Friday. One insider said company email is expected to be back on Monday. “

 

Read more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detroit Database Held For Ransom

 

Bitcoin.png

 

 

” Mayor Mike Duggan detailed Monday how Detroit has been victimized by cyber crimes, including how a city database was frozen in April and held for ransom.

  Duggan said the city database was held hostage for a ransom of 2,000 bitcoins, an encrypted digital currency. A bitcoin is currently worth $401.75, making that ransom worth $803,500. Duggan said the ransom was not paid and the database wasn’t used or needed by the city.

“ It was a good warning sign for us,” he said at Michigan’s third summit focusing on cyber security issues in government, business and other sectors at the North American International Cyber Summit at Cobo Center. “

 

Detroit News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Masque Attack: All Your iOS Apps Belong To Us

 

 

 

 

 

 

” In July 2014, FireEye mobile security researchers have discovered that an iOS app installed using enterprise/ad-hoc provisioning could replace another genuine app installed through the App Store, as long as both apps used the same bundle identifier. This in-house app may display an arbitrary title (like “New Flappy Bird”) that lures the user to install it, but the app can replace another genuine app after installation. All apps can be replaced except iOS preinstalled apps, such as Mobile Safari. This vulnerability exists because iOS doesn’t enforce matching certificates for apps with the same bundle identifier. We verified this vulnerability on iOS 7.1.1, 7.1.2, 8.0, 8.1 and 8.1.1 beta, for both jailbroken and non-jailbroken devices. An attacker can leverage this vulnerability both through wireless networks and USB. We named this attack “Masque Attack,” and have created a demo video here: ” (see above)

” We have notified Apple about this vulnerability on July 26. Recently Claud Xiao discovered the “WireLurker” malware. After looking into WireLurker, we found that it started to utilize a limited form of Masque Attacks to attack iOS devices through USB. Masque Attacks can pose much bigger threats than WireLurker. Masque Attacks can replace authentic apps,such as banking and email apps, using attacker’s malware through the Internet. That means the attacker can steal user’s banking credentials by replacing an authentic banking app with an malware that has identical UI. Surprisingly, the malware can even access the original app’s local data, which wasn’t removed when the original app was replaced. These data may contain cached emails, or even login-tokens which the malware can use to log into the user’s account directly.

  We have seen proofs that this issue started to circulate. In this situation, we consider it urgent to let the public know, since there could be existing attacks that haven’t been found by security vendors. We are also sharing mitigation measures to help iOS users better protect themselves.

Security Impacts

  By leveraging Masque Attack, an attacker can lure a victim to install an app with a deceiving name crafted by the attacker (like “New Angry Bird”), and the iOS system will use it to replace a legitimate app with the same bundle identifier. Masque Attack couldn’t replace Apple’s own platform apps such as Mobile Safari, but it can replace apps installed from app store. Masque Attack has severe security consequences:

  1. Attackers could mimic the original app’s login interface to steal the victim’s login credentials. We have confirmed this through multiple email and banking apps, where the malware uses a UI identical to the original app to trick the user into entering real login credentials and upload them to a remote server.
  2. We also found that data under the original app’s directory, such as local data caches, remained in the malware local directory after the original app was replaced. The malware can steal these sensitive data. We have confirmed this attack with email apps where the malware can steal local caches of important emails and upload them to remote server.
  3. The MDM interface couldn’t distinguish the malware from the original app, because they used the same bundle identifier. Currently there is no MDM API to get the certificate information for each app. Thus, it is difficult for MDM to detect such attacks.
  4. As mentioned in our Virus Bulletin 2014 paper “Apple without a shell – iOS under targeted attack”, apps distributed using enterprise provisioning profiles (which we call “EnPublic apps”) aren’t subjected to Apple’s review process. Therefore, the attacker can leverage iOS private APIs for powerful attacks such as background monitoring (CVE-2014-1276) and mimic iCloud’s UI to steal the user’s Apple ID and password.
  5. The attacker can also use Masque Attacks to bypass the normal app sandbox and then get root privileges by attacking known iOS vulnerabilities, such as the ones used by the Pangu team. “

 

Read more on how to protect yourself from this latest iPhone privacy threat .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sharyl Attkisson Releases Chilling Video Of Mysterious Deletions On Her Computer

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Investigative journalist Sharyl Attkisson, a senior independent contributor to The Daily Signal, released video showing what she believes to be a hacker deleting data from her computer right before her eyes.

  Attkisson began experiencing technological problems during her reporting of the 2012 terrorist attacks on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, she writes in her new book, “Stonewalled: My Fight for Truth Against the Forces of Obstruction, Intimidation, and Harassment in Obama’s Washington.”

  One September night last year while Attkisson — then with CBS News —  prepped for an interview with Thomas Pickering, chairman of the Benghazi Accountability Review Board, she watched as information in a document began disappearing before her eyes. The information, she writes, was “deleted line by line in a split second: it’s gone, gone, gone.” “

 

Read more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hackers Steal Millions In Cash From ATMs Worldwide

 

 

 

 

 

” A mysterious gang of cyber hackers have been reportedly using a new malware called Tyupkin, which allows them to steal money from ATMs worldwide, without using debit or credit cards.

  The malware is installed on an ATM, allowing the hackers to steal money by simply entering a series of codes. 

  The attack, which was first detected by Russian security firm Kaspersky Lab, has detected infected ATMs in Europe, Latin America, and Asia so far, Business Insider reports.

  An unnamed financial institution reportedly asked the Russian security firm to investigate the cyber-attack. There is no details made available on the alleged criminal gang behind these sophisticated thefts, but Kaspersky Lab says the gang has stolen “millions of dollars” using the malware.”

 

 

International Business Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JPMorgan Says Data Breach Affected 76 Million Households

 

 

Data Breaches

 

 

 

” JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPM), the biggest U.S. bank, said a previously disclosed data breach affected 76 million households and 7 million small businesses.

  Customer names, addresses, phone numbers and e-mail addresses were taken, the New York-based bank said today in a regulatory filing. Hackers also obtained internal data identifying customers by category, such as whether they are clients of the private-bank, mortgage, auto or credit-card divisions, said a person briefed on the matter.

  The breach affected anyone who visited the company’s websites, including Chase.com, or used its mobile app, said the person, who requested anonymity because that information wasn’t publicly disclosed. Some of those affected by the incursion are former clients of JPMorgan, which currently has 65 million customers and reaches half of all U.S. households, the person said. “

 

Bloomberg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New ‘Bash’ Software Bug May Pose Bigger Threat Than ‘Heartbleed’

 

 

 

 

” A newly discovered security bug in a widely used piece of Linux software, known as “Bash,” could pose a bigger threat to computer users than the “Heartbleed” bug that surfaced in April, cyber experts warned on Wednesday.

  Bash is the software used to control the command prompt on many Unix computers. Hackers can exploit a bug in Bash to take complete control of a targeted system, security experts said.

  The Department of Homeland Security’s United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team, or US-CERT, issued an alert saying the vulnerability affected Unix-based operating systems including Linux and Apple Inc’s (AAPL.O) Mac OS X.

  The “Heartbleed” bug allowed hackers to spy on computers but not take control of them, according to Dan Guido, chief executive of a cybersecurity firm Trail of Bits.”

 

Reuters

 

For those who are interested here are some links to further stories about the newly discovered cyber-threat …

 

The Switchboard: Meet Shell Shock, the security bug experts say is worsethan Heartbleed

Bash Security Bug is Worse than Heartbleed

‘Worse than Heartbleed:’ Shellshock bash bug blasts OS X systems

‘Bigger than Heartbleed’ Shellshock flaw leaves OS X

Worse than Heartbleed? Today’s Bash bug could be

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your Medical Record Is Worth More To Hackers Than Your Credit Card

 

 

 

 

” Your medical information is worth 10 times more than your credit card number on the black market.

  Last month, the FBI warned healthcare providers to guard against cyber attacks after one of the largest U.S. hospital operators, Community Health Systems Inc, said Chinese hackers had broken into its computer network and stolen the personal information of 4.5 million patients.

  Security experts say cyber criminals are increasingly targeting the $3 trillion U.S. healthcare industry, which has many companies still reliant on aging computer systems that do not use the latest security features.

” As attackers discover new methods to make money, the healthcare industry is becoming a much riper target because of the ability to sell large batches of personal data for profit,” said Dave Kennedy, an expert on healthcare security and CEO of TrustedSEC LLC. “Hospitals have low security, so it’s relatively easy for these hackers to get a large amount of personal data for medical fraud.” “

 

 

   Thanks Obama , the government has played right into the hands of the cyber-thieves on this issue . By all means let’s centralize all of our personal data where it is easy to access both by the State and the crooks . Nice job .   

 

 

 

Yahoo News reports