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Category: Cyber Warfare


FCC Commissioner: Feds Could ‘Start Tamping Down’ On Websites

 

 

 

 

” Federal Communications Commission member Ajit Pai, one of two Republicans on the five-member commission, says he’s concerned that the government will try to control websites like the Drudge Report based on their political content, CNS News reports.

  Pai, speaking Saturday at the annual Right Online conference in Washington, D.C., said he envisions net neutrality regulations passed by the agency could  result in crackdowns on websites in “the direction of content… What you’re seeing now is an impulse not just to regulate the roads over which traffic goes, but the traffic itself,” he said.

” It is conceivable to me to see the government saying, ‘We think the Drudge Report is having a disproportionate effect on our political discourse. He doesn’t have to file anything with the FEC. The FCC doesn’t have the ability to regulate anything he says, and we want to start tamping down on websites like that,'” Pai said, according to CNS.”

 

 

Video at the link

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Daily Video 4.26.15

Unreasonable Suspicion – Death In Police Custody

 

 

Published on Apr 25, 2015

” In Baltimore, a man looks at police then runs. Later, after a short time in police custody, his spine is 80% severed. He then dies. Police claim no excessive force. Shepard Smith, Trace Gallagher, Judge Andrew Napolitano. http://www.LibertyPen.com “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 Most Dangerous Hackers Of All Time

 

 

 

” As you may know Hackers aren’t inherently bad — the word “hacker” doesn’t mean “criminal” or “bad guy.”, it means someone who tries to find solutions or alternative solutions to a problem. Geeks and tech writers often refer to “black hat,” “white hat,” and “gray hat” hackers. These terms define different groups of hackers based on their behavior.

  A white hat hacker is someone working for corporations like anti-virus or firewall companies or in general trying to help society like most Anonymous Hackers.

  A Gray Hat Hacker is someone who usually doesn’t work for any company and is neither good or bad, meaning that he hacks systems kinda illegally, but still not doing any harm to the system or anyone else.

  A Black Hat Hacker is usually considered as the ‘typical’ bad guy who is doing harm, either financially or by just exploiting and hacking systems to push his own limits or better to day ego. “

 

Thanks to AnonHQ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cybergeddon: Why The Internet Could Be The Next “Failed State”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” In the New York City of the late 1970s, things looked bad. The city government was bankrupt, urban blight was rampant, and crime was high. But people still went to the city every day because that was where everything was happening. And despite the foreboding feelings hanging over New York at the time, the vast majority of those people had at most minor brushes with crime.

  Today, we all dabble in some place that looks a lot like 1970s New York City—the Internet. (For those needing a more recent simile, think the Baltimore of The Wire). Low-level crime remains rampant, while increasingly sophisticated crime syndicates go after big scores. There is a cacophony of hateful speech, vice of every kind (see Rule 34), and policemen of various sorts trying to keep a lid on all of it—or at least, trying to keep the chaos away from most law-abiding citizens. But people still use the Internet every day, though the ones who consider themselves “street smart” do so with varying levels of defenses installed. Things sort of work.

  Just like 1970s New York, however, there’s a pervasive feeling that everything could go completely to hell with the slightest push—into a place to be escaped from with the aid of a digital Snake Plissken. In other words, the Internet might soon look less like 1970s New York and more like 1990s Mogadishu: warring factions destroying the most fundamental of services, “security zones” reducing or eliminating free movement, and security costs making it prohibitive for anyone but the most well-funded operations to do business without becoming a “soft target” for political or economic gain.

  That day is not yet nigh, but logic suggests the status quo can’t continue forever. The recent rash of major breaches of corporate networks, including the theft of personal information from the health insurer Anthem and the theft of as much as a billion dollars from over 100 banks are symptoms of a much larger trend of cybercrime and espionage. And while the issue has been once again raised to national importance by the White House, it could be argued that governments have done more to exacerbate the problem than address it. Fears of digital warfare and crime are shifting budget priorities, funding the rapid expansion of the security industry and being used as a reason for proposals for new laws and policy that could reshape the Internet.

“ If we think our kids and grandkids are going to have as awesome and free an Internet as the one we have, we really have to look at why we think that,” Jason Healey, director of the Cyber Statecraft Initiative at the Atlantic Council of the United States, told Ars.”

 

Read the whole thing at ArsTechnica

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DDoS Attacks Against Governments More Powerful And Popular Than Ever

 

 

 

” When the protesters hit the streets, expect DDoS attacks to hit the Web. 

  Distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks are being used against government targets more than ever before, according to new research from Internet infrastructure firm Verisign. The attacks are increasingly powerful, cheap, and easy to deploy.

  DDoS attacks work by flooding a target—a bank, for instance, or a popular website—with data in order to make it crash or unusable for users. It’s not only an easy-to-use, cheap, and effective weapon for hackers, it’s also a goldmine for security firms paid to defend against the attacks.

  DDoS attacks against public-sector targets grew to account for 15 percent of all attacks recorded by the company at the end of 2014. The average size of attacks grew in size by 245 percent, Verisign found.

  DDoS-for-hire services can cost as little as $2 per hour, delivering an easy-to-use but potentially powerful punch to any Internet-connected devices on earth. 

  The DDoS defense market—where Verisign is a major player—is projected to hit $1.6 billion within two years.”

 

Daily Dot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Russian Researchers Expose Breakthrough U.S. Spying Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

” The U.S. National Security Agency has figured out how to hide spying software deep within hard drives made by Western Digital, Seagate, Toshiba and other top manufacturers, giving the agency the means to eavesdrop on the majority of the world’s computers, according to cyber researchers and former operatives.

  That long-sought and closely guarded ability was part of a cluster of spying programs discovered by Kaspersky Lab, the Moscow-based security software maker that has exposed a series of Western cyber-espionage operations.

  Kaspersky said it found personal computers in 30 countries infected with one or more of the spying programs, with the most infections seen in Iran, followed by Russia, Pakistan, Afghanistan, China, Mali, Syria, Yemen and Algeria. The targets included government and military institutions, telecommunication companies, banks, energy companies, nuclear researchers, media, and Islamic activists, Kaspersky said. (http://reut.rs/1L5knm0)

  The firm declined to publicly name the country behind the spying campaign, but said it was closely linked to Stuxnet, the NSA-led cyber-weapon that was used to attack Iran’s uranium enrichment facility. The NSA is the agency responsible for gathering electronic intelligence on behalf of the United States.”

 

Lots more on the latest State spying revelations at Yahoo News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Massive Utah Cyberattacks — Up To 300 Million Per Day — May Be Aimed At NSA Facility

 

 

 

” Five years ago, Utah government computer systems faced 25,000 to 30,000 attempted cyberattacks every day.

  At the time, Utah Public Safety Commissioner Keith Squires thought that was massive. “But this last year we have had spikes of over 300 million attacks against the state databases” each day: a 10,000-fold increase.

  Why? Squires says it is probably because Utah is home to the new, secretive National Security Agency computer center, and hackers believe they can somehow get to it through state computer systems.

” I really do believe it was all the attention drawn to the NSA facility. In the cyberworld, that’s a big deal,” Squires told a legislative budget committee Tuesday. “I watched as those increases jumped so much over the last few years. And talking to counterparts in other states, they weren’t seeing that amount of increase like we were.” “

Read more

Mysterious Vigilante ‘The Jester’ Single Handedly Takes Down Jihadist Websites

 

 

 

” Anonymous isn’t doing anything new by hacking Islamic extremist websites. A mysterious figure known as “The Jester” has been at it for five years.

  Jester has single-handedly taken down dozens of websites that, he deems, support jihadist propaganda and recruitment efforts. He stopped counting at 179.

  To some, he’s an Internet superhero. Think Batman, with all the vengeance-laden moral qualms of vigilantism included.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” “ I realized something needed to be done about online radicalization and ‘grooming’ of wannabe jihadis, and we didn’t have mechanisms to deal with it,” Jester said in an interview with CNNMoney. “I decided to start disrupting them.”

  Little is actually known about Jester, other than his public persona on Twitter as th3j35t3r: He is unapologetic, unabashedly pro-America and full of military jargon.

  Jester first appeared on Twitter on Dec. 19, 2009. Since then, he’s used his computer hacking skills to shut down, deface or expose anything he considers threatening to the United States — especially if it endangers soldiers. If a legitimate company is hosting the site, it usually gets a brief warning before he attacks.”

 

 

     While we were unable to track down a video interview of the Jester we did come across this print interview from Homeland Security Today and here is the CNN Money interview , see excerpt below , with the infamous hacker that our readers may find of interest . 

 

 

” On one hand, his personal crusade makes him little different from members of Anonymous. Last week, Anonymous blocked a jihadist website in retaliation for the Charlie Hebdo attack.

  The difference is that Anonymous is a worldwide, ragtag group driven by various ideologies and rules. Jester sticks to one, patriotic mission: U.S. enemies only. But the definition is up to him. In 2010, he temporarily blocked Wikileaks. In August, he took down the website of PlayStation hackers Lizard Squad.

” I answer to my conscience, and to God, sir,” he said. “That’s about it. I think my actions speak loudly enough of my principles and doctrine.” “

 

Read more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Hacktivist’ Group Anonymous Says It Will Avenge Charlie Hebdo Attacks By Shutting Down Jihadist Websites

 

 

 

 

” Hacker group Anonymous have released a video and a statement via Twitter condemning the attacks on Charlie Hebdo, in which 12 people, including eight journalists, were murdered.

  The video description says that it is “a message for al-Qaeda, the Islamic State and other terrorists”, and was uploaded to the group’s Belgian account.

  In the clip, a figure wearing the group’s symbolic Guy Fawkes mask is seated in front of a desk with the hashtag #OpCharlieHebdo – which stands for Operation Charlie Hebdo – featured on screen.

  The figure, whose voice is obscured says: “We are declaring war against you, the terrorists.”

  They add that the group will track down and close all accounts on social networks related to terrorists in order to avenge those who have been killed.”

 

The Telegraph has more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Korea Internet Access ‘Totally Down’

 

 

 

 

 

” North Korea experienced sweeping and progressively worse Internet outages extending into Monday, with one computer expert saying the country’s online access is “totally down.” The White House and the State Department declined to say whether the U.S. government was responsible.

  President Barack Obama said Friday the U.S. government expected to respond to the hacking of Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc., which he described as an expensive act of “cyber vandalism” that he blamed on North Korea. Obama did not say how the U.S. might respond, and it was not immediately clear if the Internet connectivity problems represented the retribution. The U.S. government regards its offensive cyber operations as highly classified.”

 

Read more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 “President Obama Piles On And Blames Sony” Regarding Sony Hack Attack

 

 

 

Facebook Army To Police GOP Candidates

 

 

 

” The digital army sprung to life with a click of a mouse in a nondescript office park in Alexandria. Less than 10 miles away, at the White House, the phones began to light up. One call came into the switchboard and then another. Thousands of people flooded the phone lines.

  It was early August 2014, and the callers were conservatives lambasting President Obama for promising what they described as “executive amnesty.” The deluge of angry activists was not the work of a heavily coordinated national campaign, a pricey phone-banking operation, or really an exhaustive effort of any kind.  

  It resulted from a single post on Facebook.

  The volume of calls was so high that, within hours, the White House complained it was a “security issue,” according to an email from the phone vendor hired to connect callers to the switchboard. More than 9,000 calls had been made before they pulled the plug. At the headquarters of ForAmerica, the conservative group that had launched the telephone broadside, the White House’s reaction was seen more as victory than defeat.

” We got our point across,” said David Bozell, ForAmerica’s executive director.

  In the last four years, ForAmerica has quietly amassed what it likes to call a “digital army” on Facebook—a force that that now numbers more than 7 million. The group’s spectacular growth can be explained in part by the paid acquisition of its members through targeted advertising. But thanks to a daily stream of savvy and snackable red-meat messaging, these mercenaries have become loyal conservative digital soldiers whose engagement is attracting new recruits. These days, a routine post on ForAmerica’s page reaches more than 2 million people, achieves more than 100,000 “likes,” and has tens of thousands of people repost and comment. “

National Journal

Anonymous Take Down Ft. Lauderdale’s Site For Anti-Homeless Laws

 

 

 

” The hacktivist group Anonymous is no fan of Fort Lauderdale’s new laws targeting the Florida city’s homeless population, and they took down multiple city websites to prove it.

  Using a denial-of-service attack, Anonymous was able to crash two websites and the city’s email service on Monday, the Sun-Sentinel reported. The main city website, fortlauderdale.gov, was taken down for hours, as was the police department website.

  Mayor Jack Seiler told the newspaper that all systems were back online around 6:30 p.m. local time, though sporadic problems were reported. Residents looking to pay utility bills were also denied during the outage.”

 

We Are Anonymous

We Are Legion

We Do Not Forgive

We Do Not Forget

Expect Us

 

Russia Today

 

 

Update: Broward Circuit Judge Thomas Lynch has issued a stay on Ft Lauderdale’s anti-homeless feeding laws :

 

” A judge ordered Fort Lauderdale on Tuesday to temporarily stop enforcing a new law than restricts the feeding of homeless people, intervening in a controversy that has brought the city a storm of negative international attention.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Government Employees Cause Nearly 60% Of Public Sector Cyber Incidents

 

Fed Cyber Attacks

 

 

” About 58 percent of cyber incidents reported in the public sector were caused by government employees, according to an annual data breach report compiled by Verizon. The findings — stripped of identifying information — do not mention ex-contractor Edward Snowden’s mammoth leak of national secrets. 

  Even if Snowden’s leaks had been included in the tally of results attributed to insider threats, they wouldn’t have made much of a dent. 

” If that were recorded in here, that would be a single event,” said Jay Jacobs, a Verizon senior analyst and co-author of the report. 

  Most (34 percent) of the insider incidents in the global public sector during the past three years were miscellaneous errors such as emailing documents to the wrong person. Unapproved or malicious use of data by public servants accounted for 24 percent of reported incidents.

  Surprisingly, cyberspying and intrusions via security holes in websites, known to be big problems in government, represented less than 1 percent of the situations reported. “

 

NextGov has more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anonymous Sits Down With KKK Leader Frank Ancona

 

 

 

Published on Nov 24, 2014

” Alex Poucher, a heavily involved member of Anonymous, sat down with Frank Ancona, Imperial Wizard of the Traditional American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan this Sunday. The two groups- Anonymous and the KKK- have had a feud over the last month regarding how to respond to action in Ferguson. Following the release of a controversial flyer by the KKK, Anonymous members took over the KKK’s national Twitter account. While Mr Poucher and Mr Ancona did not discuss the hacking situation, they sat down and spoke to better understand each-other and mitigate some of the tension between both groups.

The conversation lasted about 20 minutes, but News2share is currently releasing these highlights as a representation of their exchange.

Filmed by Trey Yingst
Edited by Ford Fischer
Special Thanks to Alejandro Alvarez and Laura Thompson for Outreach

For more, go to http://News2share.com “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Researchers Uncover Government Spy Tool Used To Hack Telecoms And Belgian Cryptographer

 

 

Regin-Architecture

 

 

” It was the spring of 2011 when the European Commission discovered it had been hacked. The intrusion into the EU’s legislative body was sophisticated and widespread and used a zero-day exploit to get in. Once the attackers established a stronghold on the network, they were in for the long haul. They scouted the network architecture for additional victims and covered their tracks well. Eventually, they infected numerous systems belonging to the European Commission and the European Council before being discovered.

  Two years later another big target was hacked. This time it was Belgacom, the partly state-owned Belgian telecom. In this case, too, the attack was sophisticated and complex. According to published news reports and documents leaked by Edward Snowden, the attackers targeted system administrators working for Belgacom and used their credentials to gain access to routers controlling the telecom’s cellular network. Belgacom publicly acknowledged the hack, but has never provided details about the breach.

  Then five months after that announcement, news of another high-profile breach emerged—this one another sophisticated hack targeting prominent Belgian cryptographer Jean-Jacques Quisquater. “

 

 

 

 

 

” Now it appears that security researchers have found the massive digital spy tool used in all three attacks. Dubbed “Regin” by Microsoft, more than a hundred victims have been found to date, but there are likely many others still unknown. That’s because the espionage tool—a malicious platform capable of taking over entire networks and infrastructures—has been around since at least 2008, possibly even earlier, and is built to remain stealth on a system for years.

  The threat has been known since at least 2011, around the time the EU was hacked and some of the attack files made their way to Microsoft, who added detection for the component to its security software. Researchers with Kaspersky Lab only began tracking the threat in 2012, collecting bits and pieces of the massive threat. Symantec began investigating it in 2013 after some of its customers were infected. Putting together information from each, it’s clear the platform is highly complex and modulated and can be customized with a wide range of capabilities depending on the target and the attackers’ needs. Researchers have found 50 payloads so far for stealing files and other data, but have evidence that still more exist.

“ It’s a threat that everyone has detected for some time, but no one has exposed [until now],” says Eric Chien, technical director of Symantec’s Security Technology and Response division.

  The researchers have no doubt that Regin is a nation-state tool and are calling it the most sophisticated espionage machine uncovered to date—more complex even than the massive Flame platform, uncovered by Kaspersky and Symantec in 2012 and crafted by the same team who created Stuxnet. “

 

The whole story may be read at Wired

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anonymous Seizes Ku Klux Klan Twitter Account Over Ferguson Threats

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Two Twitter accounts belonging to American racial segregation org Ku Klux Klan, @KuKluxKlanUSA and @YourKKKCentral, have been seized by Anonymous as part of the hacker-activist entity’s new campaign, #OpKKK.

  At 6:31pm PST Anonymous said it has knocked the website belonging to “Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan” — the group responsible for the Ferguson threats — offline.

  ZDNet has also received an unconfirmed statement that Anonymous has compromised KKK member email accounts, and a phone harassment campaign is being conducted on KKK members. The message is in full at the end of this article. “

 

ZDNet has more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Creepy Website Is Streaming From 73,000 Private Security Cameras

 

A Creepy Website Is Streaming From 73,000 Private Security Cameras

 

” It shouldn’t be so easy to peer into a stranger’s bedroom, much less hundreds of strangers’ bedrooms. But a website has collected the streaming footage from over 73,000 IP cameras whose owners haven’t changed their default passwords. Is this about highlighting an important security problem, or profiting off creepy voyeurism—or both?

  Insecam claims to feature feeds from IP cameras all over the world, including 11,000 in the U.S. alone. A quick browse will pull up parking lots and stores but also living rooms and bedrooms. “This site has been designed in order to show the importance of the security settings,” the site’s about page says. But it’s also clearly running and profiting off ads. “

Gizmodo has more

New ‘Bash’ Software Bug May Pose Bigger Threat Than ‘Heartbleed’

 

 

 

 

” A newly discovered security bug in a widely used piece of Linux software, known as “Bash,” could pose a bigger threat to computer users than the “Heartbleed” bug that surfaced in April, cyber experts warned on Wednesday.

  Bash is the software used to control the command prompt on many Unix computers. Hackers can exploit a bug in Bash to take complete control of a targeted system, security experts said.

  The Department of Homeland Security’s United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team, or US-CERT, issued an alert saying the vulnerability affected Unix-based operating systems including Linux and Apple Inc’s (AAPL.O) Mac OS X.

  The “Heartbleed” bug allowed hackers to spy on computers but not take control of them, according to Dan Guido, chief executive of a cybersecurity firm Trail of Bits.”

 

Reuters

 

For those who are interested here are some links to further stories about the newly discovered cyber-threat …

 

The Switchboard: Meet Shell Shock, the security bug experts say is worsethan Heartbleed

Bash Security Bug is Worse than Heartbleed

‘Worse than Heartbleed:’ Shellshock bash bug blasts OS X systems

‘Bigger than Heartbleed’ Shellshock flaw leaves OS X

Worse than Heartbleed? Today’s Bash bug could be

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phone Firewall Identifies Rogue Cell Towers Trying To Intercept Your Calls

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Rogue cell phone towers can track your phone and intercept your calls, and it’s only a matter of time before they’re as ubiquitous as GPS trackers. But at least now there’s a way to spot them.

  A firewall developed by the German firm GSMK for its secure CryptoPhone lets people know when a rogue cell tower is connecting to their phone. It’s the first system available that can do this, though it’s currently only available for enterprise customers using Android phones.

  GSMK’s CryptoPhone 500, a high-end phone that costs more than $3,000 and combines a Samsung Galaxy S3 handset with the CryptoPhone operating system, offers strong end-to-end encryption along with a specially hardened Android operating system that offers more security than other Android phones and the patented baseband firewall that can alert customers when a rogue tower has connected to their phone or turned off the mobile network’s standard encryption.

  The problem with rogue cell towers is widespread. The FCC is assembling a task force to address the illicit use of so-called IMSI catchers—the devices that pose as rogue cell towers. But the task force will only examine the use of the devices by hackers and criminals—and possibly foreign intelligence agencies—not their warrantless use by law enforcement agencies bent on deceiving judges about their deployment of the powerful surveillance technology.

  IMSI catchers, stingrays or GSM interceptors as they’re also called, force a phone to connect to them by emitting a stronger signal than the legitimate towers around them. Once connected, pings from the phone can help the rogue tower identify a phone in the vicinity and track the phone’s location and movement while passing the phone signals on to a legitimate tower so the user still receives service. Some of the IMSI software and devices also intercept and decrypt calls and can be used to push malware to vulnerable phones, and they can also be used to locate air cards used with computers. The systems are designed to be portable so they can be operated from a van or on foot to track a phone as it moves. But some can be stationary and operate from, say, a military base or an embassy. The reach of a rogue tower can be up to a mile away, forcing thousands of phones in a region to connect to it without anyone knowing.”

 

 

Read more on how to protect yourself from “rogue cell towers” and Stingray spy technology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paedophile Snared As Google Scans Gmail For Images Of Child Abuse

 

 

 

 

” Technology giant Google has developed state of the art software which proactively scours hundreds of millions of email accounts for images of child abuse.

  The breakthrough means paedophiles around the world will no longer be able to store and send vile images via email without the risk of their crimes becoming known to the authorities.

  Details of the software emerged after a 41-year-old convicted sex offender was arrested in Texas for possession of child abuse images.

  Police in the United States revealed that Google’s sophisticated search system had identified suspect material in an email sent by a man in Houston.

  Child protection experts were automatically tipped off and were then able to alert the police, who swooped after requesting the user’s personal information from Google.”

 

 

       Certainly we have no desire to facilitate the proliferation of child porn , but this news report provides yet another vivid illustration of Google’s lack of respect for basic privacy rights . Anyone that uses Gmail is crazy . How long will it be before the State “persuades” the tech giant to employ software that detects the “malcontents” and “subversives” amongst us ? 

The Telegraph

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Russian Hackers Put ‘Digital Bomb’ In Nasdaq Computers

 

 

 

” Russian computer hackers placed a “digital bomb” capable of sabotaging data and derailing the US economy into Nasdaq’s computer systems, it has emerged.

  The cybercriminals slipped the “cybergrenade” into Nasdaq’s computer network in 2010 using malware capable of spying and stealing data, according to Bloomberg Businessweek.

  The bomb was never set off, but had the capability of derailing stock market computers. An FBI system monitoring of US internet traffic picked up the alert and found that the hackers had used “zero day” vulnerabilities.

  Zero days are previously unknown flaws in computer code that allow hackers to easily take remote control of a computer.

  A similar type of malware has been designed and built by Russia’s main spy agency, the Federal Security Service of the Russian Federation. However, Russian officials denied any government connection to the security breach.

  Investigators also discovered evidence that the Russian malware was being used by a sophisticated Chinese cyberspy known to be operating a thriving criminal business.”

 

IBT has more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Out In The Open: The Tiny Box That Lets You Take Your Data Back From Google

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” The National Security Agency is scanning your email. Google and Facebook are hoarding your personal data. And online advertisers are selling your shopping habits to the highest bidder.

  Today, more than ever, people are thinking about how to opt out of this madness without quitting the internet entirely. The obvious answer is to host your own web apps on your own computer server. And thanks to the burgeoning Indie Web Movement, there’s no shortage of open source alternatives to popular services like Google Calendar, Facebook’s photo albums, or Dropbox’s file sharing. The problem is that setting up and managing your own server is a pain in the neck–at least for the average consumer.box-with-label-small

  For open source developer Johannes Ernst, what the world really needs is a simple device that anyone can use to take their data back from the wilds of the internet. So he designed the Indie Box, a personal web server preloaded with open source software that lets you run your own web services from your home network–and run them with relative ease. Any system administrator will tell you that setting up a server is just the first step. Maintaining it is the other big problem. Indie Box seeks to simplify both, with an option to fully automate all updates and maintenance tasks, from operating system patches to routine database migrations.

  You can’t buy an Indie Box yet, but you can pre-order one through the crowdfunding site Indie GoGo. A completely assembled device costs $500. That may sound like a lot, but Ernst argues that the cost is in line with other machines equipped with similar hardware. And the prices could eventually come down if Ernst is successful in raising funds for the project. Eventually, the Indie Box software platform will be available to download, and that will let people install all its tools on their own hardware.”

 

Wired has more and you can go to Indie Box’s homepage here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What The Most Secure Email In The Universe Would Look Like

 

 

Researchers develop covert optical communication system

 

 

 

” Say you wanted to send an email more secure than any message that had ever been transmitted in human history, a message with absolutely no chance of being intercepted. How would you do it?

  You may have encrypted your message according to the highest standards, but encryption doesn’t guarantee secrecy. The fact that you sent it is still detectable. An intercepting party in possession of just a few clues such as your identity, the receiver’s identify, the time of the message, surrounding incidents and the like can infer a great deal about the content of the message in the same way that the NSA can use your metadata to make inferences about your personality. You need to conceal not just what’s in the message but its very existence.

  The answer? Make your message literally impossible to detect. A team of researchers from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and Raytheon BBN Technologies led by Boulat A. Bash have created a method for doing just that, cloaking electronic communications so that the communication can’t be seen. They explain it in a paper titled Covert Optical Communication.

  The question of exactly how secure any communication can be is of no small relevance either to national security watchers worried about losing secrets or to a public increasingly concerned about governmental invasion of digital privacy. The breakthrough shows that it is possible to send a message that can’t be intercepted, no matter how determined the National Security Agency is to intercept it. “

 

A PDF file of the researcher’s paper can be read here

DefenseOne has more details , as does Phys.org