Category: Daily Dose Of Blues


Tab Benoit – Hot Licks Festival 2011 – Complete Show

 

 

 

 

Joe Bonamassa, Hubert Sumlin & Jimmy Vivino At Guitar Center’s King Of The Blues Finals

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Feb 10, 2010

” Blues titan Joe Bonamassa performing with Hubert Sumlin (Howlin Wolf), Jimmy Vivino and Tyler Dow Bryant at Guitar Center’s King of the Blues Finals. To see more video of Joe or from the King of the Blues finalists visit http://www.guitarcenter.com/kingoftheblues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Battle Of The Blues 2012 Finalist Rebecca Laird

 

 

 

Published on Oct 31, 2012

” Guitar Center Battle of the Blues finalist, Rebecca Laird’s performance from Guitar Center’s Battle of the Blues Grand Finals at Club Nokia, Los Angeles. For more information on Guitar Center or Battle of the Blues visit http://www.guitarcenter.com.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16 Year Old Girl Blues Guitarist Rocks Like A Lady! Eva Kourtes

 

 

 

 

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Rachelle Plas & Joe Louis Walker – Cognac Blues Passions 2010

 

 

 

 

Incredible Blues Pianist Luca Sestak’s Slow Blues Improvisation

 

 

 

 

Published on Jun 4, 2012

” Blues improvisation by Luca Sestak, 17, who began to play piano at age 9 and taught himself to play blues and boogie woogie and achieved an incredible level of excellence. Enjoy more of his outstanding talent and impressive repertoire at http://www.piano99.de

  UPDATE, February 19, 2015. Luca just published three of his best performances at a concert in Barcelona last October. Please enjoy “James Weber’s Breakdown” “Blame Game ” and “Hand Clap Blues” beginning at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1dGd… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday T-Bone Walker

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” Modern electric blues guitar can be traced directly back to this Texas-born pioneer, who began amplifying his sumptuous lead lines for public consumption circa 1940 and thus initiated a revolution so total that its tremors are still being felt today.

  Few major postwar blues guitarists come to mind that don’t owe T-Bone Walker an unpayable debt of gratitude. B.B. King has long cited him as a primary influence, marveling at Walker‘s penchant for holding the body of his guitar outward while he played it. Gatemouth Brown, Pee Wee Crayton,Goree Carter, Pete Mayes, and a wealth of other prominent Texas-bred axemen came stylistically right out of Walker during the late ’40s and early ’50s. Walker‘s nephew, guitarist R.S. Rankin, went so far as to bill himself as T-Bone Walker, Jr. for a 1962 single on Dot, “Midnight Bells Are Ringing” (with his uncle’s complete blessing, of course; the two had worked up a father-and-son-type act long before that).

  Aaron Thibeault Walker was a product of the primordial Dallas blues scene. His stepfather, Marco Washington, stroked the bass fiddle with the Dallas String Band, and T-Bone followed his stepdad’s example by learning the rudiments of every stringed instrument he could lay his talented hands on. One notable visitor to the band’s jam sessions was the legendary Blind Lemon Jefferson. During the early ’20s, Walker led the sightless guitarist from bar to bar as the older man played for tips.

  In 1929, Walker made his recording debut with a single 78 for Columbia, “Wichita Falls Blues”/”Trinity River Blues,” billed as Oak Cliff T-Bone. Pianist Douglas Fernell was his musical partner for the disc.Walker was exposed to some pretty outstanding guitar talent during his formative years; besides Jefferson, Charlie Christian — who would totally transform the role of the guitar in jazz with his electrified riffs much as Walker would with blues, was one of his playing partners circa 1933.

  T-Bone Walker split the Southwest for Los Angeles during the mid-’30s, earning his keep with saxophonist Big Jim Wynn‘s band with his feet rather than his hands as a dancer. Popular bandleader Les Hite hired Walker as his vocalist in 1939. Walker sang “T-Bone Blues”with the Hite aggregation for Varsity Records in 1940, but didn’t play guitar on the outing. It was about then, though, that his fascination with electrifying his axe bore fruit; he played L.A. clubs with his daring new toy after assembling his own combo, engaging in acrobatic stage moves — splits, playing behind his back — to further enliven his show.” Continue reading

Discography

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Happy Birthday Junior Parker

 

 

 

 

Biography

” His velvet-smooth vocal delivery to the contrary, Junior Parker was a product of the fertile postwar Memphis blues circuit whose wonderfully understated harp style was personally mentored by none other than regional icon Sonny Boy Williamson.

  Herman Parker, Jr. only traveled in the best blues circles from the outset. He learned his initial licks from Williamson and gigged with the mighty Howlin’ Wolf while still in his teens. Like so many young blues artists, Little Junior (as he was known then) got his first recording opportunity from talent scout Ike Turner, who brought him to Modern Records for his debut session as a leader in 1952. It produced the lone single “You’re My Angel,” with Turner pounding the 88s and Matt Murphy deftly handling guitar duties.

  Parker and his band, the Blue Flames (including Floyd Murphy, Matt‘s brother, on guitar), landed at Sun Records in 1953 and promptly scored a hit with their rollicking “Feelin’ Good” (something of a Memphis response to John Lee Hooker‘s primitive boogies). Later that year, Little Junior cut a fiery “Love My Baby” and a laid-back “Mystery Train” for Sun, thus contributing a pair of future rockabilly standards to the Sun publishing coffers (Hayden Thompson revived the former, Elvis Presley the latter).

  Before 1953 was through, the polished Junior Parker had moved on to Don Robey‘s Duke imprint in Houston. It took a while for the harpist to regain his hitmaking momentum, but he scored big in 1957 with the smooth “Next Time You See Me,” an accessible enough number to even garner some pop spins.” Continue reading

Discography

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Jazz Gillum – Key To The Highway

 

 

 

 

Published on Feb 11, 2013

” Record: Bluebird 8529 … Recorded May 9, 1940 “

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Trace Adkins – Arlington

 

 

 

Uploaded on Feb 26, 2009

” Official video of Trace Adkins’s Arlington from the album Songs About Me. Buy It Here:http://smarturl.it/qqqphp

“Arlington” is sung from the viewpoint of a soldier, killed in battle and buried at Arlington National Cemetery. It was inspired by United States Marine Corps Corporal Patrick Nixon, who died in battle in 2003.
Like Trace Adkins on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/traceadkins
Follow Trace Adkins on Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/TraceAdkins
Official Website: http://www.traceadkins.com/wired/
See More Videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/TraceAdki… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr John Plays The Blues For You

 

 

 

 

Published on Nov 4, 2014

” Dr John (Mac Rebennack) demonstrates New Orleans-style blues playing exclusively for our readers. Look for him on the cover of our December 2014 issue! “

Ready For The Blues – 22 Vintage Blues Tracks – One Hour Of Blues

 

 

 

 

Published on Dec 29, 2014

” Ready For The Blues – 22 Vintage Blues Tracks
♫ SUBSCRIBE HERE : http://bit.ly/10VoH4l
Find the album here: http://amzn.to/1D1r3gA http://bit.ly/1xqhSo0 http://bit.ly/1Be5Grb
Join us on facebook : http://on.fb.me/1yY77w3
00:00 – Don’t Start Me Talkin’ – Sugar Blue
03:56 – Still a Fool – Muddy Waters, Little Walter
07:14 – That’s Allright – Jimmy Rogers
10:06 – My Babe – Little Walter
12:51 – Rock Me – Muddy Waters, James Cotton
16:05 – Shake the Boogie – Sonny Boy Williamson
18:53 – All Night Boogie – Howlin Wolf
21:11 – I’m a Man – Bo Diddley, Billy Boy Arnold
24:15 – I’m In the Mood – John Lee Hooker, Eddie Kirkland
27:25 – King Biscuit Stomp – Big Joe Williams
30:00 – The Blues That Made Me Drunk – Sonny Boy Williamson
33:02 – Chicago Breakdown – Doctor Ross
35:59 – Baker Shop Boogie – James Cotton, Willie Nix
38:44 – Evening Sun – Big Walter Horton, Johnny Shines
41:14 – Easy – Big Walter Horton
44:18 – Jump the Boogie – Papa Lightfoot
46:41 – Mambo Chillun – John Lee Hooker
49:36 – Standing At the Crossraods – Elmore James
52:24 – Saturday Night – Roy Brown
54:46 – Straight Alky Blues – Leroy Carr
58:09 – Chicken Hearted Woman – Clarence Samuels
01:00:50 – Sugar Mama – Pee Wee Hughes

  JazzAndBluesExperience – SUBSCRIBE HERE : http://bit.ly/10VoH4l (Re)Discover the Jazz and Blues greatest hits – JazznBluesExperience is your channel for all the best jazz and blues music. Find your favorite songs and artists and experience the best of jazz music and blues music. Subscribe for free to stay connected to our channel and easily access our video updates! – Facebook FanPage:http://www.facebook.com/JazznBluesExp… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Siegel – Schwall Band – “The Blues Is Alright”

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on May 30, 2009

” SAMBO ARTHUR IRBY takes lead vocals on this one.CORKY SIEGEL- Harmonica/Piano/Vocals. JIM SCHWALL – Guitar/Vocals, The “Legendary” SAM LAY – Drums/Vocals, ROLLO RADFORD – Bass/Vocals, SAMBO ARTHUR IRBY- Percussion’s, Drums, Vocals”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday Fats Waller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” Not only was Fats Waller one of the greatest pianists jazz has ever known, he was also one of its most exuberantly funny entertainers — and as so often happens, one facet tends to obscure the other. His extraordinarily light and flexible touch belied his ample physical girth; he could swing as hard as any pianist alive or dead in his classic James P. Johnson-derived stride manner, with a powerful left hand delivering the octaves and tenths in a tireless, rapid, seamless stream. Waller also pioneered the use of the pipe organ and Hammond organ in jazz — he called the pipe organ the “God box” — adapting his irresistible sense of swing to the pedals and a staccato right hand while making imaginative changes of the registration. As a composer and improviser, his melodic invention rarely flagged, and he contributed fistfuls of joyous yet paradoxically winsome songs like “Honeysuckle Rose,” “Ain’t Misbehavin,'” “Keepin’ Out of Mischief Now,” “Blue Turning Grey Over You” and the extraordinary “Jitterbug Waltz” to the jazz repertoire.

  During his lifetime and afterwards, though, Fats Waller was best known to the world for his outsized comic personality and sly vocals, where he would send up trashy tunes that Victor Records made him record with his nifty combo, Fats Waller & His Rhythm. Yet on virtually any of his records, whether the song is an evergreen standard or the most trite bit of doggerel that a Tin Pan Alley hack could serve up, you will hear a winning combination of good knockabout humor, foot-tapping rhythm and fantastic piano playing. Today, almost all of Fats Waller‘s studio recordings can be found on RCA’s on-again-off-again series The Complete Fats Waller, which commenced on LPs in 1975 and was still in progress during the 1990s.” Continue reading

Discography

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Newport Folk Festival

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Aug 29, 2010

” Some rare footage of two great Mississippi blues men, the fiery slide of Fred McDowell and the sweet and mellow John Hurt with his beautiful finger picking style, only glimpses that leave you wanting a whole lot more. Plus some of the young white guys who were making great music at the time, John Koerner and the Paul Butterfield band with Paul on harp and Mike Bloomfield on guitar.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday Jimmy Thackery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” Singer, songwriter, and guitar virtuoso Jimmy Thackery carved an enviable niche for himself in the world of electric blues. Known for his gritty, blue-collar approach and marathon live shows, Thackery was for many years part of the Nighthawks, one of the hardest-working blues bar bands in North America. By the late ’80s, he was touring and recording under his own name, and finding widespread acceptance on the festival circuit. His hard-edged, tough-as-nails approach to guitar playing and his trio’s driving rhythm section holds appeal for fans of both the straight-ahead blues of Muddy Waters and the roots rock of Bruce Springsteen and Joe Grushecky. Like the Nighthawks and Grushecky‘s Houserockers, much of the material Thackery performs can safely be called blues or blues-rock. Hardcore blues like “It’s My Own Fault” and popular blues-rock chestnuts like “Red House” from Jimi Hendrix are fair game for Thackery & His Drivers, which included Michael Patrick on bass and Mark Stutso on drums and vocals.

  Born in Pittsburgh, Thackery was raised in Washington, D.C. In high school, he played in a band with Bonnie Raitt‘s brother, David, who exposed him to the music of Buddy Guy; Thackery saw both Guy and Jimi Hendrix perform in Washington, D.C. Thackery joined the Nighthawks in 1974, after being introduced to harmonica man Mark Wenner by fellow guitarist Bobby Radcliff, who was then based in D.C. Thackery recorded more than 20 albums with the Nighthawks and toured the U.S., Canada, Europe, and Japan. He left the band in 1987 and struck out on his own, needing a break from the Nighthawks‘ 300-nights-a-year tour schedule. ” Continue reading

Discography

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Happy Birthday Big Joe Turner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” The premier blues shouter of the postwar era, Big Joe Turner‘s roar could rattle the very foundation of any gin joint he sang within — and that’s without a microphone. Turner was a resilient figure in the history of blues — he effortlessly spanned boogie-woogie, jump blues, even the first wave of rock & roll, enjoying great success in each genre.

  Turner, whose powerful physique certainly matched his vocal might, was a product of the swinging, wide-open Kansas City scene. Even in his teens, the big-boned Turner looked entirely mature enough to gain entry to various K.C. nighteries. He ended up simultaneously tending bar and singing the blues before hooking up with boogie piano master Pete Johnson during the early ’30s. Theirs was a partnership that would endure for 13 years.

  The pair initially traveled to New York at John Hammond‘s behest in 1936. On December 23, 1938, they appeared on the fabled Spirituals to Swing concert at Carnegie Hall on a bill with Big Bill Broonzy,Sonny Terry, the Golden Gate Quartet, and Count Basie. Turner and Johnson performed “Low Down Dog” and “It’s All Right, Baby” on the historic show, kicking off a boogie-woogie craze that landed them a long-running slot at the Cafe Society (along with piano giants Meade Lux Lewis and Albert Ammons).

  As 1938 came to a close, Turner and Johnson waxed the thundering “Roll ‘Em Pete” for Vocalion. It was a thrilling up-tempo number anchored by Johnson‘s crashing 88s, and Turner would re-record it many times over the decades. Turner and Johnson waxed their seminal blues “Cherry Red” the next year for Vocalion with trumpeter Hot Lips Page and a full combo in support. In 1940, the massive shouter moved over to Decca and cut “Piney Brown Blues” with Johnson rippling the ivories. But not all of Turner‘s Decca sides teamed him with Johnson; Willie “The Lion” Smith accompanied him on the mournful “Careless Love,” while Freddie Slack’s Trio provided backing for “Rocks in My Bed” in 1941.

  Turner ventured out to the West Coast during the war years, building quite a following while ensconced on the L.A. circuit. In 1945, he signed on with National Records and cut some fine small combo platters under Herb Abramson‘s supervision. Turner remained with National through 1947, belting an exuberant “My Gal’s a Jockey” that became his first national R&B smash. Contracts didn’t stop him from waxing an incredibly risqué two-part “Around the Clock” for the aptly named Stag imprint (as Big Vernon!) in 1947. There were also solid sessions for Aladdin that year that included a wild vocal duel with one of Turner‘s principal rivals, Wynonie Harris, on the ribald two-part “Battle of the Blues.” ” Continue reading

Discography

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Happy Birthday Taj Mahal

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” One of the most prominent figures in late 20th century blues, singer/multi-instrumentalist Taj Mahal played an enormous role in revitalizing and preserving traditional acoustic blues. Not content to stay within that realm, Mahal soon broadened his approach, taking a musicologist’s interest in a multitude of folk and roots music from around the world — reggae and other Caribbean folk, jazz, gospel, R&B, zydeco, various West African styles, Latin, even Hawaiian. The African-derived heritage of most of those forms allowed Mahal to explore his own ethnicity from a global perspective and to present the blues as part of a wider musical context. Yet while he dabbled in many different genres, he never strayed too far from his laid-back country blues foundation. Blues purists naturally didn’t have much use for Mahal‘s music, and according to some of his other detractors, his multi-ethnic fusions sometimes came off as indulgent, or overly self-conscious and academic. Still, Mahal‘s concept was vindicated in the ’90s, when a cadre of young bluesmen began to follow his lead — both acoustic revivalists (Keb’ Mo’, Guy Davis) and eclectic bohemians (Corey Harris, Alvin Youngblood Hart).

  Taj Mahal was born Henry St. Clair Fredericks in New York on May 17, 1942. His parents — his father a jazz pianist/composer/arranger of Jamaican descent, his mother a schoolteacher from South Carolina who sang gospel — moved to Springfield, Massachusetts, when he was quite young, and while growing up there, he often listened to music from around the world on his father’s short-wave radio Bo Diddley. While studying agriculture and animal husbandry at the University of Massachusetts, he adopted the musical alias Taj Mahal (an idea that came to him in a dream) and formed Taj Mahal & the Elektras, who played around the area during the early ’60s. After graduating, Mahal moved to Los Angeles in 1964 and, after making his name on the local folk-blues scene, formed the Rising Sons with guitarist Ry Cooder. The group signed to Columbia and released one single, but the label didn’t quite know what to make of their forward-looking blend of Americana, which anticipated a number of roots rock fusions that would take shape in the next few years; as such, the album they recorded sat on the shelves, unreleased until 1992.” Continue reading 

Discography

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Lightnin’ Hopkins – Mr Charlie Your Rollin’ Mill Is Burnin’ Down

 

 

 

 

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Terry ” Harmonica ” Bean – Of Delta Mississippi Blues – With the Blues Band

 

 

 

 

Published on Mar 17, 2012

” Terry ” Harmonica ” Bean in live – Mike Jay Greene (guitare), Fred Jouglas (basse) et Simon “Shuffle” Boyer (batterie). @ l’Espace le Bois aux Dames Samoëns Haute Savoie France le Vendredi 16 Mars 2012 “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jeff Beck With Eric Clapton And A Roy Buchanan Song- 2 Of The Most Beautiful Songs In The World

 

 

 

 

Published on Jan 3, 2015

” I like Clapton’s opening comment at 0:12 “If there was a coin we could be like,you know,I could be on one side and he could be on the other”. Jeff Beck should have the words “Talent Scout” in his resume because he knew great talent when he saw it, heard it or performed with them. Les Paul,Cliff Gallup,B.B. King,Bo Diddley,Scotty Moore,Little Richard,Jerry Lee Lewis,Chuck Berry,Matt Murphy Paul Burlison,Buddy Guy,Earl Hooker,James Burton,Steve Cropper,Hank Marvin,Ian Stewart,Hendrix,Clapton,Page,Townsend,Ro­d Stewart,Ron Wood,Billy Gibbons,John McLaughlin,Stevie Wonder,Stanley Clarke,Jan Hammer,Carlos Santana,David Gilmour,Roger Waters,Aynsley Dunbar,Cozy Powell,Jack Bruce,Tim Bogert,Carmine Appice,Buddy Miles,Paul McCartney are just a few of many more to add.
The opening song “Cause We’ve Ended as Lovers” was written by Stevie Wonder and was voted the number 1 most beautiful instrumental of All Time. Jeff dedicated that song to Roy Buchanan on his landmark 1975 LP “Blow by Blow”. Since it was Jeff Beck who turned me onto Roy Buchanan’s music (I have almost every recording by him starting back from 1957) so I felt that I had to add,what I think is, Roy’s most beautiful song as a follow up. This Roy Buchanan song is an instrumental version of “The Messiah Will Come Again” recorded live in Chicago around 1985. Roy was known as “The World’s Greatest Unknown Guitarist” and there is a great book about him titled “American Axe”http://www.amazon.com/Roy-Buchanan-Am…
Buy it if you want to learn more about this great guitarist.
Jeff Beck http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Beck
Jeff Beck Discography http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Bec…
Blow by Blow LP http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blow_by_…
Roy Buchanan http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Buch…
Roy Buchanan’s first lp from 1972 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Buch…)
Back issues of Jeff Beck Bulletins http://www.ainian.com/backbull.html
0:00 Nice intro by Clapton
0:34 Cause We’ve Ended As Lovers
2:54 Eric Clapton lets loose
3:30 Doyle Bramhall II solo
4:02 Jeff Beck’s solo
Nathan East-Bass http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathan_East
Steve Gadd-Drums http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Gadd
6:13 The Messiah Will Come Again (I love how this song starts off slow then by the end it’s smoking hot. I once listened to this song 13 times in a row and it still gives me the goose bumps when ever I hear those pinched harmonics and Flash Guitar runs.
Here is a link to one of my favorite Roy Buchanan songs called “When A Guitar Plays The Blues” at Carnegie Hall in NYC https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ka7yH…
And here is another link of Roy performing “Green Onions” and “Short Fuse” at Carnegie Hall in NYC 1985https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNW-5… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sister Rosetta Tharpe – Documentary 2011

 

 

 

 

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Jimi Hendrix – 12 String Blues

 

 

 

 

Published on Nov 2, 2012

” Mr. Jimi Hendrix with his 12 string acoustic guitar. Filmed in widescreen. A very clear image of Jimi and his guitar work.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sean Carney Band With Dany Franchi Torrita Blues Festival

 

 

 

 

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