Category: Video


Courtesy Of Rightwing News

 

 

 

 

    And for those who might be a bit nervous about what to expect when they arrive , this Canadian offers some tips: 

 

 

 

 

Drive safe …

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From The Dr of Common Sense

 

 

 

RIP Lonnie Mack

Lonnie Mack Dead: Blues Guitar Great Dies At 74

 

 

 

 

” Blues guitar great Lonnie Mack is dead at 74, Alligator Records announced late Thursday. According to a press release, he died of natural causes on Thursday at Centennial Medical Center near his home in Smithville, Tennessee.

  Central New York native and fellow blues guitarist Joe Bonamassa spread the sad news on social media early Friday morning”

 

 

 

 

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Opening Statement 4.16.17

Election 2016 Clinton, Sanders – Trump, Cruz & Kasich

 

 

 

Via ReasonTV

 

 

Published on Apr 15, 2016

” Remy tries to out-Democrat the candidates in last night’s CNN debate.”

Hillary Clinton Addresses Her Losing Streak Cold Open – SNL

 

Legendary Country Blues Guitarists

 

 

 

Published on Dec 6, 2013

This DVD collection presents some of the rarest footage of legendary Country Blues artists that we have been fortunate to find. The footage varies from hi-quality film to analog videos taped over 40 years ago. But above all, the music and performances are powerful and evocative. The sounds of Skip James, Bukka White, Big Bill Broonzy, Son House, Will Shade, Rev. Gary Davis and others on this 115 minute collection will give you shivers up your spine and get your feet tapping. This is the Country Blues of a time long past.

  Titles include: CHARLIE BURSE & WILL SHADE Kansas City Blues BIG BILL BROONZY Trouble In Mind, Backwater Blues SON HOUSE Talk about the Blues, So Hard To Love Someone SKIP JAMES Cherry Ball Blues SON HOUSE Sick and Bad Blues BUKKA WHITE Aberdeen Blues, Tombstone Blues, Brownsville Blues, REV. GARY DAVIS Blind Gary Davis – A Documentary by Harold Becker UNKNOWN ARTIST Take My Hand, Precious Lord, I’m Going Too RALPH WILLIS & WASHBOARD PETE SANDERS Dream I Had On My Mind, I’ve Been Living With The Blues, Midnight Special SAM CHATMON Sales Tax Blues, Outside Friend, Fishing Blues (Evil Jackson), Glad When You’re Dead MANCE LIPSCOMB I Want to Do Something for You, Alabama Jubilee HENRY JOHNSON Blood Red River WILLIE TRICE Be Your Dog, Run Here Gal, Poor Boy Long Ways From Home, Good Time Boogie, Sweet Sugar Mama, Stand and Welcome Jesus, When The Saints Go Marching In SON HOUSE & BUDDY GUY I Wish I Had My Whole Heart In My Hand”

Running Time: 115 minutes

For details go to: http://www.guitarvideos.com/products/… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday “Big” Bill Broonzy

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Big Bill Broonzy was born William Lee Conley Broonzy in the tiny town of Scott, Mississippi, just across the river from Arkansas. During his childhood, Broonzy‘s family — itinerant sharecroppers and the descendants of ex-slaves — moved to Pine Bluff to work the fields there. Broonzy learned to play a cigar box fiddle from his uncle, and as a teenager, he played violin in local churches, at community dances, and in a country string band. During World War I, Broonzy enlisted in the U.S. Army, and in 1920 he moved to Chicago and worked in the factories for several years. In 1924 he met Papa Charlie Jackson, a New Orleans native and pioneer blues recording artist for Paramount. Jackson took Broonzy under his wing, taught him guitar, and used him as an accompanist. Broonzy‘s entire first session at Paramount in 1926 was rejected, but he returned in November 1927 and succeeded in getting his first record, House Rent Stomp, onto Paramount wax. As one of his early records came out with the garbled moniker of Big Bill Broomsley, he decided to shorten his recording name to Big Bill, and this served as his handle on records until after the second World War. Among aliases used for Big Bill on his early releases were Big Bill Johnson, Sammy Sampson, and Slim Hunter.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Broonzy‘s earliest records do not demonstrate real promise, but this would soon change. In 1930, the Hokum Boys broke up, and Georgia Tom Dorsey decided to keep the act going by bringing in Big Bill and guitarist Frank Brasswell to replace Tampa Red, billing themselves as “the Famous Hokum Boys.” With Georgia Tom and Brasswell, Broonzy hit his stride and penned his first great blues original, “I Can’t Be Satisfied.” This was a hit and helped make his name with record companies. Although only half-a-dozen blues artists made any records during 1932, the worst year in the history of the record business, one of them was Big Bill, who made 20 issued sides that year.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Through Georgia Tom and Tampa Red, Big Bill met Memphis Minnie and toured as her second guitarist in the early ’30s, but apparently did not record with her. When he did resume recording in March 1934 it was for Bluebird’s newly established Chicago studio under the direction of Lester Melrose. Melrose liked Broonzy‘s style, and before long, Big Bill would begin working as Melrose‘s unofficial second-in-command, auditioning artists, matching numbers to performers, booking sessions, and providing backup support to other musicians. He played on literally hundreds of records for Bluebird in the late ’30s and into the ’40s, including those made by his half-brother, Washboard Sam,Peter Chatman (aka Memphis Slim), John Lee “Sonny Boy” Williamson, and others. With Melrose,Broonzy helped develop the “Bluebird beat,” connoting a type of popular blues record that incorporated trap drums and upright string bass. This was the precursor of the “Maxwell Street sound” or “postwar Chicago blues,” and helped to redefine the music in a format that would prove popular in the cities. Ironically, while Broonzy was doing all this work for Melrose at Bluebird, his own recordings as singer were primarily made for ARC, and later Columbia’s subsidiary Okeh. This was his greatest period, and during this time Broonzy wrote and recorded such songs as “Key to the Highway,” “W.P.A. Blues,” “All by Myself,” and “Unemployment Stomp.” For other artists, Broonzy wrote songs such as “Diggin’ My Potatoes.” All told, Big Bill Broonzy had a hand in creating more than 100 original songs.”Continue reading

 

 

 

Discography

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Rick Estrin And The Nightcats – “Never Trust A Woman”

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Mar 30, 2010

” Live at Callahan’s, March 28, 2010″

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday To A Master

 

 

JEFF BECK

” Beck grew up in Wallington, England. His mother’s piano playing and the family’s radio tuned to everything from dance to classical made sure Beck was surrounded by music from a young age.

“ For my parents, who lived through the war, music was a source of comfort to them. Life was tense and music helped them forget about their troubles. I’m sure that made an impression on me,” recalls Beck. “I was really small when jazz broke through in England and I can still remember sneaking off to the living room to listen to it on the radio—much to my parent’s disapproval.”

  Inspired by the music he heard, it wasn’t long before Beck picked up a guitar and began playing around London. He briefly attended Wimbledon’s Art College before leaving to devote all of his time to music. Beck worked as a session player, with Screaming Lord Sutch – the British equivalent to Screaming Jay Hawkins – and the Tridents before he replaced Eric Clapton as the Yardbirds’ lead guitarist in 1965.”

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 ” Geoffrey Arnold “Jeff” Beck (born 24 June 1944) is an English rock guitarist. He is one of three noted guitarists to have played with The Yardbirds(Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page are the other two). Beck also formed The Jeff Beck Group and Beck, Bogert & Appice.

  Much of Beck’s recorded output has been instrumental, with a focus on innovative sound and his releases have spanned genres ranging from blues-rockheavy metal, jazz fusion and an additional blend of guitar-rock and electronica. Although he recorded two hit albums (in 1975 and 1976) as a solo act, Beck has not established or maintained the sustained commercial success of many of his contemporaries and bandmates.

   Beck appears on albums by Mick JaggerKate BushRoger WatersDonovanStevie WonderLes PaulZuccheroCyndi LauperBrian May and ZZ Top. In 1988, he made a cameo appearance in the movie Twins.

  He was ranked 5th in Rolling Stone‘s list of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time” and the magazine has described him as “one of the most influential lead guitarists in rock”.  MSNBC has called him a “guitarist’s guitarist”.  Beck has earned wide critical praise and received the Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance six times and Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance once. He has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice: as a member of The Yardbirds (1992) and as a solo artist (2009).  “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 All About Jazz is celebrating Jeff Beck’s birthday today!

 

” Jeff Beck isn’t your typical guitar legend. His goal, in fact, is to make you forget that he plays guitar. “I don\’t understand why some people will only accept a guitar if it has an instantly recognizable guitar sound,” says Beck.”Finding ways to use the same guitar people have been using for 50 years to make sounds that no one has heard before is truly what gets me off… Read more. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” This Jeff Beck recordings listing is arranged in chronological order, except for the recordings he made with the Yardbirds. Jeff Beck was a member of the Yardbirds for two years and some of the recordings he made with them were not released until 14 years later. All records listed are US and England, unless otherwise specified.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Jeff , Long May You Play

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The American Folk Blues Festival 1962-1966 Vol 1

 

 

 

” The American Folk Blues Festival 1962 1966 vol 1

1. T-Bone Walker – Call Me When You Need Me (1962) 

2. Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee – Hootin’ Blues (1962) 

3. Memphis Slim – The Blues Is Everywhere (1962) 

4. Otis Rush – I Can’t Quit You Baby (1966) 

5. Lonnie Johnson – Another Night to Cry (1963) 

6. Sippie Wallace – Women Be Wise (1966)  

7. John Lee Hooker – Hobo Blues (1965) 

8. Eddie Boyd – Five Long Years (1965) 

9. Walter “Shakey” Horton – Shakey’s Blues (1965)

10. Junior Wells – Hoodoo Man Blues (1966) 

11. Big Joe Williams – Mean Stepfather (1963) 

12. Mississippi Fred McDowell – Going Down to the River (1965)  

13. Willie Dixon – Weak Brain and Narrow Mind (1964)

14. Sonny Boy Williamson (1963) 

15. Otis Spann – Spann’s Blues (1963) 

16. Muddy Waters – Got My Mojo Working (1963) 

17. Finale – Bye Bye Blues (1963) “

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Happy Belated Birthday Skip James

Born 6.21.02 Died 10.3.69

 

 

 

 

Biography

” Among the earliest and most influential Delta bluesmen to record, Skip James was the best-known proponent of the so-called Bentonia school of blues players, a genre strain invested with as much fanciful scholarly “research” as any. Coupling an oddball guitar tuning set against eerie, falsetto vocals,James‘ early recordings could make the hair stand up on the back of your neck. Even more surprising was when blues scholars rediscovered him in the ’60s and found his singing and playing skills intact. Influencing everyone from a young Robert Johnson (Skip‘s “Devil Got My Woman” became the basis of Johnson‘s “Hellhound on My Trail”) to Eric Clapton (who recorded James‘ “I’m So Glad” on the first Cream album), Skip James‘ music, while from a commonly shared regional tradition, remains infused with his own unique personal spirit.” Continue reading

 

Discography

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Fathers Day Blues – Live At The Compound Grill

 

 

 

Uploaded on Mar 30, 2011

” We composed Father’s Day Blues in 2010. Our dad was not able to visit his father (our grandfather) on Father’s day and he said he felt kind of sad. So we made this song to cheer him up.
“Live” at the Compound Grill, Scottsdale, AZ “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Juke Joint Blues – 42 Great Songs From The Mississippi Delta & The Deep South!

 

 

 

Published on Jun 30, 2014

” Juke Joint Blues — 42 great songs from the Mississippi Delta & the Deep South!

http://bit.ly/1gk8ayD
http://amzn.to/1mWezAm
http://bit.ly/SHESyN

00:00 – You Shook Me — Muddy Waters
02:43 – Dust My Blues — Elmore James
05:50 – Keep Your Hands to Yourself — John Lee Hooker
08:12 – Lightnin’ Blues — Lightnin Slim
11:10 – Hard Grind — Wild Jimmy Spruill
14:08 – Sugar Mama — Pee Wee Hughes
16:36 – Jealous Man — Johnny Lewis
19:09 – She’s So Good to Me — Little Sam Davis
21:20 – Neglected Woman — Alex Moore
24:02 – Chicken Hearted Woman — Clarence Samuels
26:44 – One Room Country Shack — Mercy Dee
29:34 – Week End Blues — Lafayette Thomas
32:41 – New Orleans Bound — Lightnin Slim
35:31 – I’m Him — Schoolboy Cleve
37:39 – Ride Hooker Ride — Earl Hooker
40:23 – Lillie Mae Boogie — Alex Moore
42:58 – Mama Does the Boogie — Red Johnson
45:47 – Wine Women and Whiskey — Papa Lightfoot
48:01 – Little Lean Woman — Little Al Thomas
50:03 – Cool Down Mama — Lost John Hunter
52:18 – I’m Gonna Leave You Baby — Lazy Lester
54:31 – She’s Mine All Mine — Arthur Gunter
56:56 – She’s Taking All My Money — Johnny Lewis
59:39 – Deep South Guitar Blues — Lafayette Thomas
01:02:43 – Philippine Blues — Country Jim
01:05:04 – Lost Child – Eddie Hope
01:07:14 – KC Boogie – KC Douglas
01:10:21 – Wine Head Baby – Lazy Slim Jim
01:12:13 – Good Road Blues — Wright Holmes
01:14:50 – Lester’s Stomp — Lazy Lester
01:16:45 – Dark Muddy Room — Mercy Dee
01:19:47 – TNT Woman — Sonny Boy Holmes
01:22:21 – Strange Letter Blues — Schoolboy Cleve
01:25:11 – On the Hook — Earl Hooker
01:27:53 – Try and Understand — Melvin Simpson
01:30:14 – Every Night About This Time — Magic Sam
01:32:31 – A Fool No More — Eddie Hope
01:34:55 – Jump the Boogie — Papa Lightfoot
01:37:18 – Santa Fe Blues — Pee Wee Hughes
01:39:43 – Congo Monbo — Guitar Gable
01:42:05 – Rub a Little Boogie — Duke Bayou
01:44:24 – Coming Home — Elmore James

  JazzAndBluesExperience – SUBSCRIBE HERE :http://bit.ly/10VoH4l (Re)Discover the Jazz and Blues greatest hits – JazznBluesExperience is your channel for all the best jazz and blues music. Find your favorite songs and artists and experience the best of jazz music and blues music. Subscribe for free to stay connected to our channel and easily access our video updates! – Facebook FanPage: http://www.facebook.com/JazznBluesExp… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday “Big Bill” Morganfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” Many men try to fill their father’s shoes when they join the family business. Few, however, must prove they are up to the task in front of an audience as large as the one that watched Big Bill Morganfield. Blues lovers the world over revere his late father, Muddy Waters.

  Morganfield didn’t take up the challenge until several years after his dad passed away in 1983. When he realized he wanted to delve into the world of blues as his father had, he purchased a guitar, intending to pay homage to the legendary Waters, whose real name was McKinley Morganfield. That tribute was six long years in coming, years that Morganfield spent teaching himself how to play the instrument. An evening spent playing at Center Stage in Atlanta with Lonnie Mack followed. The audience, which numbered 1000, went wild over the performance and set the novice musician’s spirit afire.

  He went on to establish a contemporary blues group, but abandoned the idea after several months. Dissatisfied with the music he was making, he pulled back from performing to further hone his skills. He concentrated on traditional blues and also learned how to write songs. During this time, Morganfield supported himself by teaching. He possesses degrees in English and communications, which he earned at Tuskegee University and Auburn University, respectively.” Continue reading

Discography

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Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee – BBC – 1974

 

 

 

 

Published on April 1, 2013

SONNY TERRY
” Tedell Saunders was a blues harmonica player and singer, born in Greensboro, North Carolina, on October 24, 1911, and died in New York on 12 March 1986.
Tuerto by accident at the age of 14 years and blind as a result of a blow during a fight, several years later, Terry concentrated on the harmonica, partnering with Blind Gary Davis and Blind Boy Fuller, two blind musicians, with whom he played in the streets of Durham and Raleigh, accompanied by a red-haired guide, who played the washboard and eventually became known as Bull City Red. made ​​some recordings for a local label, with a sound genuinely to Style Piedmont. It was precisely network who introduced him to Brownie McGhee, who professed great admiration for Fuller. Terry emigrated to New York when John Hammond signed him to his concerts at Carnegie Hall (1938), sharing experiences with Leadbelly and at Fuller died in 1940, was definitely in town. From this moment, the musical careers of Terry and McGhee are joined in the duo “Sonny & Brownie”, one of the most stable and successful bands in the history of the blues, performing a large number of recordings. When, in the 1960s, the rural blues began to lose favor with the black public, Sonny & Brownie were welcomed by the public folk and the European public. In the early 1980s, Terry and McGhee separated, after a period of growing disaffection. Terry continued to record (with Johnny Winter or Willie Dixon), participated in the film “The Color Purple” by Steven Spielberg and starred frequently. Style The style of Terry was personal and original, exuberant and joyful, imitating harmonic sound trains, dogs barking, howling screams … combined with his falsetto voice. Very representative of mountain style, typical of the Apalaches.

  BROWNIE Mc Ghee Walter McGhee, was a blues guitarist and singer, born in Knoxville, Tennessee, on November 30, 1915, and died in Oakland, California on February 16 1996. McGhee, paralyzed in his right leg, he learned to play guitar from his father, who taught him the typical fingerpicking style typical of the Appalachians. He left home with only ten years and devoted himself to playing minstrel shows and medecine shows. During the 1930s, he formed a band McGhee own, with two guitars, harmonica and washboard. In one of his performances, Bull City Red introduced them to Blind Boy Fuller and Sonny Terry. McGhee has always shown a special admiration for Fuller, to the extent that after his death, made ​​several recordings under the name of Blind Boy Fuller II, in a clear Piedmont.1 When Fuller died in 1940, he went McGhee New York, with Sonny Terry.From this moment, the musical careers of Terry and McGhee are joined in the duo “Sonny & Brownie”, one of the most stable and successful bands in the history of the blues, performing a large number of recordings. When, in the 1960s, the rural blues began to lose favor with the black public, Sonny & Brownie were welcomed by the public folk and the European public. In the early 1980s, Terry and McGhee separated, after a period of growing disaffection. McGhee moved to Los Angeles, where he continued playing sporadically, until his death.”

Gary Moore – Parsienne Walkways Live Montreux 2010

 

 

 

 

Telephone Blues ~ Hollywood Fats Band

 

 

 

Published on May 9, 2013

” Recorded in 1976, Ted Brinson Recording Studios, Los Angeles, Ca

Al Blake,Vocals
Richard Innes,Drums
Hollywood Fats,Guitar
Freddy Kaplan,Piano
Larry Taylor,Bass

A rare and never released track from the sessions that produced the band’s seminal and now legendary LP ” Hollywood Fats Band .” “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Paul Butterfield Blues Band – Driftin’ Blues – Monterey 1967

 

 

 

 

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Kim Wilson, Charlie Musselwhite, Mark Hummel

 

 

 

Uploaded on Mar 12, 2007

” Blues Harp Blowout – Three of the baddest harp players on the blues circuit.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Nemeth – Late Night Boogie

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Jan 25, 2008

” John Nemeth, Kid Andersen, Kedar Roy and Paul Revelli on the Bruce Latimer Show performing Late Night Boogie.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday Kenny Wayne Shepard

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Kenny Wayne Shepherd and his group exploded on the scene in the mid-’90s and garnered huge amounts of radio airplay on commercial radio, which historically has not been a solid home for blues and blues-rock music, with the exception of Stevie Ray Vaughan in the mid-’80s. Shepherd was born June 12, 1977, in Shreveport, Louisiana. The Shreveport native began playing at age seven, figuring out Muddy Waters licks from his father’s record collection (he has never taken a formal lesson). At age 13, he was invited on-stage by New Orleans bluesman Brian Lee and held his own for several hours; thus proving himself, he decided on music as a career. He formed his own band, which featured lead vocalist Corey Sterling, gaining early exposure through club dates and, later, radio conventions.

  Shepherd‘s father/manager used his own contacts and pizzazz in the record business to help land his son a major-label record deal with Irving Azoff‘s Giant Records.Ledbetter Heights, his first album, was released two years later in 1995 and was an immediate hit, selling over 500,000 copies by early 1996. Most blues records never achieve that level of commercial success, much less ones released by artists who are still in their teens. Although Shepherd — who has been influenced by (and has sometimes played with) guitarists Stevie Ray Vaughan, Albert King, Slash, Robert Cray, and Duane Allman — is definitely a performer who thrives in front of an audience, Ledbetter Heights was impressive for its range of styles: acoustic blues, rockin’ blues, Texas blues, Louisiana blues. The only style that he doesn’t tackle is Chicago blues, owing to Shepherd‘s home base being smack dab in the middle of the Texas triangle.” Continue reading 

Discography

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Key To The Highway – Harmonica – Åmål Blues Fest 2009

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Jul 11, 2009

” Åmål´s Blues Fest 2009.
Harmonica: Hakan Ehn.
Intro: Crossroads (Robert Johnson), inspired by Adam Gussow and Eric Clapton/Cream.
0:10: Key to the Highway (Broonzy/Segar).
2:45: Rockabilly Boogie Harmonica (Markku & Hakan), Markku Sainmaa: guitars, keyboards, drums.
6:00: Hakan´s Harmonica Boogie.

Amplifier: Roland Cube Street.
Microphone: Shure 545SD, rewired for high impedance.
Ipod with backing tracks. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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