Category: Video


Happy Birthday “Howlin’ Wolf”

 

 

 

Biography

 

” In the history of the blues, there has never been anyone quite like the Howlin’ Wolf. Six foot three and close to 300 pounds in his salad days, the Wolf was the primal force of the music spun out to its ultimate conclusion. A Robert Johnson may have possessed more lyrical insight, a Muddy Waters more dignity, and a B.B. King certainly more technical expertise, but no one could match him for the singular ability to rock the house down to the foundation while simultaneously scaring its patrons out of its wits.”

 

 

 

 

 

” He was born in West Point, MS, and named after the 21st President of the United States (Chester Arthur). His father was a farmer and Wolf took to it as well until his 18th birthday, when a chance meeting with Delta blues legend Charley Patton changed his life forever. Though he never came close to learning the subtleties of Patton‘s complex guitar technique, two of the major components of Wolf‘s style (Patton‘s inimitable growl of a voice and his propensity for entertaining) were learned first hand from the Delta blues master. The main source of Wolf‘s hard-driving, rhythmic style on harmonica came when Aleck “Rice” Miller (Sonny Boy Williamson) married his half-sister Mary and taught him the rudiments of the instrument. He first started playing in the early ’30s as a strict Patton imitator, while others recall him at decade’s end rocking the juke joints with a neck-rack harmonica and one of the first electric guitars anyone had ever seen. After a four-year stretch in the Army, he settled down as a farmer and weekend player in West Memphis, AR, and it was here that Wolf‘s career in music began in earnest.

  By 1948, he had established himself within the community as a radio personality. As a means of advertising his own local appearances, Wolf had a 15-minute radio show on KWEM in West Memphis, interspersing his down-home blues with farm reports and like-minded advertising that he sold himself. But a change in Wolf‘s sound that would alter everything that came after was soon in coming because when listeners tuned in for Wolf‘s show, the sound was up-to-the-minute electric. Wolf had put his first band together, featuring the explosive guitar work of Willie Johnson, whose aggressive style not only perfectly suited Wolf‘s sound but aurally extended and amplified the violence and nastiness of it as well. In any discussion of Wolf‘s early success both live, over the airwaves, and on record, the importance of Willie Johnson cannot be overestimated.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Wolf finally started recording in 1951, when he caught the ear of Sam Phillips, who first heard him on his morning radio show. The music Wolf made in the Memphis Recording Service studio was full of passion and zest and Phillips simultaneously leased the results to the Bihari Brothers in Los Angeles and Leonard Chess in Chicago. Suddenly, Howlin’ Wolf had two hits at the same time on the R&B charts with two record companies claiming to have him exclusively under contract. Chess finally won him over and as Wolf would proudly relate years later, “I had a 4,000 dollar car and 3,900 dollars in my pocket. I’m the onliest one drove out of the South like a gentleman.” It was the winter of 1953 and Chicago would be his new home.

  When Wolf entered the Chess studios the next year, the violent aggression of the Memphis sides was being replaced with a Chicago backbeat and, with very little fanfare, a new member in the band. Hubert Sumlin proved himself to be the Wolf‘s longest-running musical associate. He first appears as a rhythm guitarist on a 1954 session, and within a few years’ time his style had fully matured to take over the role of lead guitarist in the band by early 1958. In what can only be described as an “angular attack,” Sumlin played almost no chords behind Wolf, sometimes soloing right through his vocals, featuring wild skitterings up and down the fingerboard and biting single notes. If Willie Johnson was Wolf‘s second voice in his early recording career, then Hubert Sumlin would pick up the gauntlet and run with it right to the end of the howler’s life.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” By 1956, Wolf was in the R&B charts again, racking up hits with “Evil” and “Smokestack Lightnin’.” He remained a top attraction both on the Chicago circuit and on the road. His records, while seldom showing up on the national charts, were still selling in decent numbers down South. But by 1960, Wolf was teamed up with Chess staff writer Willie Dixon, and for the next five years he would record almost nothing but songs written by Dixon. The magic combination of Wolf‘s voice, Sumlin‘s guitar, and Dixon‘s tunes sold a lot of records and brought the 50-year-old bluesman roaring into the next decade with a considerable flourish. The mid-’60s saw him touring Europe regularly with “Smokestack Lightnin'” becoming a hit in England some eight years after its American release. Certainly any list of Wolf‘s greatest sides would have to include “I Ain’t Superstitious,” “The Red Rooster,” “Shake for Me,” “Back Door Man,” “Spoonful,” and “Wang Dang Doodle,” Dixon compositions all. While almost all of them would eventually become Chicago blues standards, their greatest cache occurred when rock bands the world over started mining the Chess catalog for all it was worth. One of these bands was the Rolling Stones, whose cover of “The Red Rooster” became a number-one record in England. At the height of the British Invasion, the Stones came to America in 1965 for an appearance on ABC-TV’s rock music show, Shindig. Their main stipulation for appearing on the program was that Howlin’ Wolf would be their special guest. With the Stones sitting worshipfully at his feet, the Wolf performed a storming version of “How Many More Years,” being seen on his network-TV debut by an audience of a few million. Wolf never forgot the respect the Stones paid him, and he spoke of them highly right up to his final days.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Dixon and Wolf parted company by 1964 and Wolf was back in the studio doing his own songs. One of the classics to emerge from this period was “Killing Floor,” featuring a modern backbeat and a incredibly catchy guitar riff from Sumlin. Catchy enough for Led Zeppelin to appropriate it for one of their early albums, cheerfully crediting it to themselves in much the same manner as they had done with numerous other blues standards. By the end of the decade, Wolf‘s material was being recorded by artists including the Doors, the Electric Flag, the Blues Project, Cream, and Jeff Beck. The result of all these covers brought Wolf the belated acclaim of a young, white audience. Chess’ response to this was to bring him into the studio for a “psychedelic” album, truly the most dreadful of his career. His last big payday came when Chess sent him over to England in 1970 to capitalize on the then-current trend of London Session albums, recording with Eric Clapton on lead guitar and other British superstars.Wolf‘s health was not the best, but the session was miles above the earlier, ill-advised attempt to update Wolf‘s sound for a younger audience.

  As the ’70s moved on, the end of the trail started coming closer. By now Wolf was a very sick man; he had survived numerous heart attacks and was suffering kidney damage from an automobile accident that sent him flying through the car’s windshield. His bandleader Eddie Shaw firmly rationed Wolf to a meager half-dozen songs per set. Occasionally some of the old fire would come blazing forth from some untapped wellspring, and his final live and studio recordings show that he could still tear the house apart when the spirit moved him. He entered the Veterans Administration Hospital in 1976 to be operated on, but never survived it, finally passing away on January 10th of that year.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” But his passing did not go unrecognized. A life-size statue of him was erected shortly after in a Chicago park. Eddie Shaw kept his memory and music alive by keeping his band, the Wolf Gang, together for several years afterward. A child-education center in Chicago was named in his honor and in 1980 he was elected to the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame. In 1991, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. A couple of years later, his face was on a United States postage stamp. Howlin’ Wolf is now a permanent part of American history.” Read more

 

 

 

Discography

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David Gogo Plays The Blues – Dust My Broom

 

 

 

Uploaded on Aug 22, 2010

” From Rarearth in Vernon BC David Gogo plays the blues.

  Gogo was born in Nanaimo, British Columbia, and received his first guitar at the age of five. By the age of 16, he was getting regular work as a musician. Gogo formed a band called The Persuaders, which eventually opened for blues performers such as Johnny Winter, Buddy Guy and Albert Collins. After performing in Europe, Gogo signed a solo record deal with EMI Records.[1]

  His albums have included Dine Under the Stars, Change of Pace, Bare Bones, “Halfway to Memphis”, “Live At Deer Lake”, Skeleton Key, “Vibe” and “Acoustic”. He appeared as a guest musician on Tom Cochrane’s album Mad Mad World, Bob Walsh’s album “Bob Walsh Live — A Canadian Blues Rendez-Vous” and others. His “Acoustic” album, released in 2006, was nominated for a 2007 Juno Award. He is a two-time Maple Blues Award winner.
David Gogo is the cousin of Trooper keyboardist Paul Gogo.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bonnie Raitt & Roy Rogers – Gnawin’ On It

Clay Shelburn & Zac Stokes – Walmart Rockstars Pride and Joy

 

 

 

As Obama Toots His Own Horn, Judge Jeanine Rips Him a New One

 

 

 

Published on Jun 6, 2015

” Declaring his foreign policy to be a raging success based on some unnamed “poll,” Barack Obama has invited derision and laughter. Here, Judge Jeanine samples his “accomplishments” and asks how he could possibly make such a claim.”

Dude Sits Down At Public Piano….Gives it a Schoolin

 

 

 

 

BB King & Joe Cocker – I’m In A Dangerous Mood

 

 

 

Uploaded on Jan 10, 2011

” Nice performance by BB King and Joe Cocker.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday Tinsley Ellis

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” A hard-rocking, high-voltage blues guitarist most often compared to Stevie Ray Vaughan, Tinsley Ellis is hardly one of the legions of imitators that comparison might imply. Schooled in a variety of Southern musical styles, Ellis draws not only from fiery Vaughan-style blues-rock, but also Texas bluesmen like Freddie King and Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown, the soulful blues of B.B. King, the funky grit of Memphis soul, and numerous other electric bluesmen. Ellis has been praised in many quarters for the relentless, storming intensity of his sound, and criticized in others for his relative lack of pacing and dynamic contrast (he’s also been dubbed a much stronger guitarist than vocalist). Yet no matter which side of the fence one falls on, it’s generally acknowledged that Ellis remains a formidable instrumentalist and a genuine student of the blues.

  Ellis was born in Atlanta in 1957, and spent most of his childhood in southern Florida. He began playing guitar in elementary school, first discovering the blues through the flagship bands of the British blues boom: John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers, the Peter Green-led Fleetwood Mac, the Yardbirds, the Rolling Stones, and so on. He soon moved on to a wide variety of original sources, becoming especially fond of B.B. King and Freddie King. After high school, Ellis moved back to Atlanta in 1975 to attend Emory University, and soon found work on the local music scene, joining a bar band called the Alley Cats (which also featured future Fabulous Thunderbird Preston Hubbard). In 1981, Ellis co-founded The Heartfixers with singer/harmonica player Chicago Bob Nelson, and they recorded an eponymous debut album for the tiny Southland imprint. They soon signed with the slightly larger Landslide and issued Live at the Moon Shadow in 1983, by which point they were one of the most popular live blues acts in the South. However, Nelson left the group shortly after the album’s release, and Ellis took over lead vocal chores.” Continue reading

 

 

Discography

 

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Happy Birthday To Memphis Minnie & Jimmy Rogers

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

” Tracking down the ultimate woman blues guitar hero is problematic because woman blues singers seldom recorded as guitar players and woman guitar players (such as Rosetta Tharpe and Sister O.M. Terrell) were seldom recorded playing blues. Excluding contemporary artists, the most notable exception to this pattern was Memphis Minnie. The most popular and prolific blueswoman outside the vaudeville tradition, she earned the respect of critics, the support of record-buying fans, and the unqualified praise of the blues artists she worked with throughout her long career. Despite her Southern roots and popularity, she was as much a Chicago blues artist as anyone in her day. Big Bill Broonzy recalls her beating both him and Tampa Red in a guitar contest and claims she was the best woman guitarist he had ever heard. “ Continue reading

 

 

Discography

 

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Biography

 

” Guitarist Jimmy Rogers was the last living connection to the groundbreaking first Chicago band of Muddy Waters (informally dubbed “the Headhunters” for their penchant of dropping by other musicians’ gigs and “cutting their heads” with a superior on-stage performance). Instead of basking in world-wide veneration, he was merely a well-respected Chicago elder boasting a seminal ’50s Chess Records catalog, both behind Waters and on his own.

  Born James A. Lane (Rogers was his stepdad’s surname), the guitarist grew up all over: Mississippi, Atlanta, West Memphis, Memphis, and St. Louis. Actually, Rogers started out on harp as a teenager.Big Bill Broonzy, Joe Willie Wilkins, and Robert Jr. Lockwood all influenced him, the latter two when he passed through Helena. Rogers settled in Chicago during the early ’40s and began playing professionally around 1946, gigging with Sonny Boy Williamson, Sunnyland Slim, and Broonzy.

  Rogers was playing harp with guitarist Blue Smitty when Muddy Waters joined them. When Smitty split, Little Walter was welcomed into the configuration, Rogers switched over to second guitar, and the entire post-war Chicago blues genre felt the stylistic earthquake that directly followed. Rogers made his recorded debut as a leader in 1947 for the tiny Ora-Nelle logo, then saw his efforts for Regal and Apollo go unissued.” Continue reading 

 

 

Discography

 

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Tab Benoit – Hot Licks Festival 2011 – Complete Show

 

 

 

 

Joe Bonamassa, Hubert Sumlin & Jimmy Vivino At Guitar Center’s King Of The Blues Finals

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Feb 10, 2010

” Blues titan Joe Bonamassa performing with Hubert Sumlin (Howlin Wolf), Jimmy Vivino and Tyler Dow Bryant at Guitar Center’s King of the Blues Finals. To see more video of Joe or from the King of the Blues finalists visit http://www.guitarcenter.com/kingoftheblues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Battle Of The Blues 2012 Finalist Rebecca Laird

 

 

 

Published on Oct 31, 2012

” Guitar Center Battle of the Blues finalist, Rebecca Laird’s performance from Guitar Center’s Battle of the Blues Grand Finals at Club Nokia, Los Angeles. For more information on Guitar Center or Battle of the Blues visit http://www.guitarcenter.com.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16 Year Old Girl Blues Guitarist Rocks Like A Lady! Eva Kourtes

 

 

 

 

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Rachelle Plas & Joe Louis Walker – Cognac Blues Passions 2010

 

 

 

 

Incredible Blues Pianist Luca Sestak’s Slow Blues Improvisation

 

 

 

 

Published on Jun 4, 2012

” Blues improvisation by Luca Sestak, 17, who began to play piano at age 9 and taught himself to play blues and boogie woogie and achieved an incredible level of excellence. Enjoy more of his outstanding talent and impressive repertoire at http://www.piano99.de

  UPDATE, February 19, 2015. Luca just published three of his best performances at a concert in Barcelona last October. Please enjoy “James Weber’s Breakdown” “Blame Game ” and “Hand Clap Blues” beginning at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1dGd… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday T-Bone Walker

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” Modern electric blues guitar can be traced directly back to this Texas-born pioneer, who began amplifying his sumptuous lead lines for public consumption circa 1940 and thus initiated a revolution so total that its tremors are still being felt today.

  Few major postwar blues guitarists come to mind that don’t owe T-Bone Walker an unpayable debt of gratitude. B.B. King has long cited him as a primary influence, marveling at Walker‘s penchant for holding the body of his guitar outward while he played it. Gatemouth Brown, Pee Wee Crayton,Goree Carter, Pete Mayes, and a wealth of other prominent Texas-bred axemen came stylistically right out of Walker during the late ’40s and early ’50s. Walker‘s nephew, guitarist R.S. Rankin, went so far as to bill himself as T-Bone Walker, Jr. for a 1962 single on Dot, “Midnight Bells Are Ringing” (with his uncle’s complete blessing, of course; the two had worked up a father-and-son-type act long before that).

  Aaron Thibeault Walker was a product of the primordial Dallas blues scene. His stepfather, Marco Washington, stroked the bass fiddle with the Dallas String Band, and T-Bone followed his stepdad’s example by learning the rudiments of every stringed instrument he could lay his talented hands on. One notable visitor to the band’s jam sessions was the legendary Blind Lemon Jefferson. During the early ’20s, Walker led the sightless guitarist from bar to bar as the older man played for tips.

  In 1929, Walker made his recording debut with a single 78 for Columbia, “Wichita Falls Blues”/”Trinity River Blues,” billed as Oak Cliff T-Bone. Pianist Douglas Fernell was his musical partner for the disc.Walker was exposed to some pretty outstanding guitar talent during his formative years; besides Jefferson, Charlie Christian — who would totally transform the role of the guitar in jazz with his electrified riffs much as Walker would with blues, was one of his playing partners circa 1933.

  T-Bone Walker split the Southwest for Los Angeles during the mid-’30s, earning his keep with saxophonist Big Jim Wynn‘s band with his feet rather than his hands as a dancer. Popular bandleader Les Hite hired Walker as his vocalist in 1939. Walker sang “T-Bone Blues”with the Hite aggregation for Varsity Records in 1940, but didn’t play guitar on the outing. It was about then, though, that his fascination with electrifying his axe bore fruit; he played L.A. clubs with his daring new toy after assembling his own combo, engaging in acrobatic stage moves — splits, playing behind his back — to further enliven his show.” Continue reading

Discography

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Happy Birthday Junior Parker

 

 

 

 

Biography

” His velvet-smooth vocal delivery to the contrary, Junior Parker was a product of the fertile postwar Memphis blues circuit whose wonderfully understated harp style was personally mentored by none other than regional icon Sonny Boy Williamson.

  Herman Parker, Jr. only traveled in the best blues circles from the outset. He learned his initial licks from Williamson and gigged with the mighty Howlin’ Wolf while still in his teens. Like so many young blues artists, Little Junior (as he was known then) got his first recording opportunity from talent scout Ike Turner, who brought him to Modern Records for his debut session as a leader in 1952. It produced the lone single “You’re My Angel,” with Turner pounding the 88s and Matt Murphy deftly handling guitar duties.

  Parker and his band, the Blue Flames (including Floyd Murphy, Matt‘s brother, on guitar), landed at Sun Records in 1953 and promptly scored a hit with their rollicking “Feelin’ Good” (something of a Memphis response to John Lee Hooker‘s primitive boogies). Later that year, Little Junior cut a fiery “Love My Baby” and a laid-back “Mystery Train” for Sun, thus contributing a pair of future rockabilly standards to the Sun publishing coffers (Hayden Thompson revived the former, Elvis Presley the latter).

  Before 1953 was through, the polished Junior Parker had moved on to Don Robey‘s Duke imprint in Houston. It took a while for the harpist to regain his hitmaking momentum, but he scored big in 1957 with the smooth “Next Time You See Me,” an accessible enough number to even garner some pop spins.” Continue reading

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Jazz Gillum – Key To The Highway

 

 

 

 

Published on Feb 11, 2013

” Record: Bluebird 8529 … Recorded May 9, 1940 “

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“Taps”

“Taps” Performed In Arlington National Cemetery

Summer And Winter

 

 

 

 

Published on Jan 21, 2014

” The buglers of The United States Army Band “Pershing’s Own” perform over 5000 missions a year in Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, VA.
Featured here are SSG Jesse Tubb (summer) and SSG Drew Fremder (winter) “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr John Plays The Blues For You

 

 

 

 

Published on Nov 4, 2014

” Dr John (Mac Rebennack) demonstrates New Orleans-style blues playing exclusively for our readers. Look for him on the cover of our December 2014 issue! “

Ready For The Blues – 22 Vintage Blues Tracks – One Hour Of Blues

 

 

 

 

Published on Dec 29, 2014

” Ready For The Blues – 22 Vintage Blues Tracks
♫ SUBSCRIBE HERE : http://bit.ly/10VoH4l
Find the album here: http://amzn.to/1D1r3gA http://bit.ly/1xqhSo0 http://bit.ly/1Be5Grb
Join us on facebook : http://on.fb.me/1yY77w3
00:00 – Don’t Start Me Talkin’ – Sugar Blue
03:56 – Still a Fool – Muddy Waters, Little Walter
07:14 – That’s Allright – Jimmy Rogers
10:06 – My Babe – Little Walter
12:51 – Rock Me – Muddy Waters, James Cotton
16:05 – Shake the Boogie – Sonny Boy Williamson
18:53 – All Night Boogie – Howlin Wolf
21:11 – I’m a Man – Bo Diddley, Billy Boy Arnold
24:15 – I’m In the Mood – John Lee Hooker, Eddie Kirkland
27:25 – King Biscuit Stomp – Big Joe Williams
30:00 – The Blues That Made Me Drunk – Sonny Boy Williamson
33:02 – Chicago Breakdown – Doctor Ross
35:59 – Baker Shop Boogie – James Cotton, Willie Nix
38:44 – Evening Sun – Big Walter Horton, Johnny Shines
41:14 – Easy – Big Walter Horton
44:18 – Jump the Boogie – Papa Lightfoot
46:41 – Mambo Chillun – John Lee Hooker
49:36 – Standing At the Crossraods – Elmore James
52:24 – Saturday Night – Roy Brown
54:46 – Straight Alky Blues – Leroy Carr
58:09 – Chicken Hearted Woman – Clarence Samuels
01:00:50 – Sugar Mama – Pee Wee Hughes

  JazzAndBluesExperience – SUBSCRIBE HERE : http://bit.ly/10VoH4l (Re)Discover the Jazz and Blues greatest hits – JazznBluesExperience is your channel for all the best jazz and blues music. Find your favorite songs and artists and experience the best of jazz music and blues music. Subscribe for free to stay connected to our channel and easily access our video updates! – Facebook FanPage:http://www.facebook.com/JazznBluesExp… “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Siegel – Schwall Band – “The Blues Is Alright”

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on May 30, 2009

” SAMBO ARTHUR IRBY takes lead vocals on this one.CORKY SIEGEL- Harmonica/Piano/Vocals. JIM SCHWALL – Guitar/Vocals, The “Legendary” SAM LAY – Drums/Vocals, ROLLO RADFORD – Bass/Vocals, SAMBO ARTHUR IRBY- Percussion’s, Drums, Vocals”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday Fats Waller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” Not only was Fats Waller one of the greatest pianists jazz has ever known, he was also one of its most exuberantly funny entertainers — and as so often happens, one facet tends to obscure the other. His extraordinarily light and flexible touch belied his ample physical girth; he could swing as hard as any pianist alive or dead in his classic James P. Johnson-derived stride manner, with a powerful left hand delivering the octaves and tenths in a tireless, rapid, seamless stream. Waller also pioneered the use of the pipe organ and Hammond organ in jazz — he called the pipe organ the “God box” — adapting his irresistible sense of swing to the pedals and a staccato right hand while making imaginative changes of the registration. As a composer and improviser, his melodic invention rarely flagged, and he contributed fistfuls of joyous yet paradoxically winsome songs like “Honeysuckle Rose,” “Ain’t Misbehavin,'” “Keepin’ Out of Mischief Now,” “Blue Turning Grey Over You” and the extraordinary “Jitterbug Waltz” to the jazz repertoire.

  During his lifetime and afterwards, though, Fats Waller was best known to the world for his outsized comic personality and sly vocals, where he would send up trashy tunes that Victor Records made him record with his nifty combo, Fats Waller & His Rhythm. Yet on virtually any of his records, whether the song is an evergreen standard or the most trite bit of doggerel that a Tin Pan Alley hack could serve up, you will hear a winning combination of good knockabout humor, foot-tapping rhythm and fantastic piano playing. Today, almost all of Fats Waller‘s studio recordings can be found on RCA’s on-again-off-again series The Complete Fats Waller, which commenced on LPs in 1975 and was still in progress during the 1990s.” Continue reading

Discography

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Newport Folk Festival

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Aug 29, 2010

” Some rare footage of two great Mississippi blues men, the fiery slide of Fred McDowell and the sweet and mellow John Hurt with his beautiful finger picking style, only glimpses that leave you wanting a whole lot more. Plus some of the young white guys who were making great music at the time, John Koerner and the Paul Butterfield band with Paul on harp and Mike Bloomfield on guitar.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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