Tag Archive: Affordable Care Act


Obamacare Offers Firms $3,000 Incentive To Hire Illegals Over

Native-Born Workers

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Under the president’s new amnesty, businesses will have a $3,000-per-employee incentive to hire illegal immigrants over native-born workers because of a quirk of Obamacare.

  President Obama’s temporary amnesty, which lasts three years, declares up to 5 million illegal immigrants to be lawfully in the country and eligible for work permits, but it still deems them ineligible for public benefits such as buying insurance on Obamacare’s health exchanges.

  Under the Affordable Care Act, that means businesses who hire them won’t have to pay a penalty for not providing them health coverage — making them $3,000 more attractive than a similar native-born worker, whom the business by law would have to cover.

  The loophole was confirmed by congressional aides and drew condemnation from those who said it put illegal immigrants ahead of Americans in the job market.

“ If it is true that the president’s actions give employers a $3,000 incentive to hire those who came here illegally, he has added insult to injury,” said Rep. Lamar Smith, Texas Republican. “The president’s actions would have just moved those who came here illegally to the front of the line, ahead of unemployed and underemployed Americans.”

  A Department of Homeland Security official confirmed that the newly legalized immigrants won’t have access to Obamacare, which opens up the loophole for employers looking to avoid the penalty. “

 

Washington Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over 214,000 Doctors Opt Out Of Obamacare Exchanges

 

 

 

 

” Over 214,000 doctors won’t participate in the new plans under the Affordable Care Act (ACA,) analysis of a new survey by Medical Group Management Association shows. That number of 214,524, estimated by American Action Forum, is through May 2014, but appears to be growing due to plans that force doctors to take on burdensome costs. It’s also about a quarter of the total number of 893,851 active professional physicians reported by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

  In January, an estimated 70% of California’s physicians were not participating in Covered California plans.

  Here are some of the reasons why:

1.      Reimbursements under Obamacare are at bottom-dollar – they are even lower than Medicare reimbursements, which are already significantly below market rates. “It is estimated that where private plans pay $1.00 for a service, Medicare pays $0.80, and ACA exchange plans are now paying about $0.60,” a study by the think-tank American Action Forum finds. “For example, Covered California plans are setting their plan fee schedules in line with that of Medi-Cal-California’s Medicaid Program-which means exchange plans are cutting provider reimbursement by up to 40 percent.” “

 

Read the rest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trouble For Democrats: More Senate Seats Are At Risk

senate

 

 

 

” Democrats are finding that their path to keeping control of the U.S. Senate this year is getting bumpier.

  At least four states where Democrats hold Senate seats that once were seen as fairly safe are now considered in play: Michigan, Iowa, Colorado and New Hampshire.

  They join seven states with Democratic incumbents where analysts see decent bets for Republican pickups: Alaska, Arkansas, Louisiana, Montana, North Carolina, South Dakota and West Virginia. Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney carried all seven in 2012.

  The new four are now battlegrounds for the same reasons that plague Democrats elsewhere. The Affordable Care Act is detested in many circles. Anyone associated with Washington is often toxic. And popular Republicans who are running for other offices are often on the ballot.”

 

Read on

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vulnerable Dems Want IRS To Step Up

 

IRS Dem Helper

 

 

 

” Senate Democrats facing tough elections this year want the Internal Revenue Service to play a more aggressive role in regulating outside groups expected to spend millions of dollars on their races.

  In the wake of the IRS targeting scandal, the Democrats are publicly prodding the agency instead of lobbying them directly. They are also careful to say the IRS should treat conservative and liberal groups equally, but they’re concerned about an impending tidal wave of attack ads funded by GOP-allied organizations. Much of the funding for those groups is secret, in contrast to the donations lawmakers collect, which must be reported publicly.

  One of the most powerful groups is Americans for Prosperity, funded by the billionaire industrialists Charles and David Koch. It has already spent close to $30 million on ads attacking Democrats this election cycle.”

 

Read more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CBO Triples Estimate Of Obamacare Work Force Cuts To 2.3 Million

CBO Labor Force

 

” Obamacare is now expected to take 2.3 million full-time workers out of the labor market through 2021 while insuring 2 million fewer Americans in 2014 than expected, the Congressional Budget Office said Tuesday.

  The overall result of Affordable Care Act regulation will be a 1.5 percent to 2 percent reduction in the numbers of hours worked between 2017 and 2024, the CBO concluded in its 2014 Budget and Economic Outlook.

  The updated numbers are nearly triple the 2011 estimate, which found that Obamacare would push just 800,000 people would leave the work force.”

 

The story continues at The Daily Caller 

 

Rules For Equal Coverage By Employers Remain Elusive Under Health Law

 

 

 

” The Obama administration is delaying enforcement of another provision of the new health care law, one that prohibits employers from providing better health benefits to top executives than to other employees.

  Tax officials said they would not enforce the provision this year because they had yet to issue regulations for employers to follow.

  The Affordable Care Act, adopted nearly four years ago, says employer-sponsored health plans must not discriminate “in favor of highly compensated individuals” with respect to either eligibility or benefits. The government provides a substantial tax break for employer-sponsored insurance, and, as a matter of equity and fairness, lawmakers said employers should not provide more generous coverage to a select group of high-paid employees.

  But translating that goal into reality has proved difficult.

  Officials at the Internal Revenue Service said they were wrestling with complicated questions like how to measure the value of employee health benefits, how to define “highly compensated” and what exactly constitutes discrimination.”

The Old Grey Lady has more

Young People Pummel Obamacare Ads On The Daily Show

 

 

Brosurance

 

” Will keg stands and one-night hookups convince young people to sign up for Obamacare? Two liberal groups in Colorado launched a pro-Obamacare advertising campaign with the controversial messages months ago.

  This week, The Daily Show featured the two ads in a segment with correspondent Aasif Mandvi, who interviewed a spokesman from the Colorado Consumer Health Initiative in an attempt to understand why he thought the “Brosurance” and “Let’s Get Physical” ads were effective.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Open Letter To The Obama Administration And American Citizens

 

 

” An Open Letter to the Obama Administration and American Citizens:

  My family’s journey with securing our new insurance under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) started on October 1, 2013. I have decided to write this letter to let the American people know what it has been like for us. We are a family of four, with two little boys’ ages seven years old and three years old. My husband and I have had full time jobs for 6 years and 13 years respectively. We have been with the same two companies for those years. We are a middle class family; we own our three bedroom two bath house, we own two cars, and previously provided our own insurance for the four of us. We have coverage through Individual Blue from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Alabama until 12/31/13. Our premiums have been $380.00 a month, which also included dental coverage for all four of us.

  On October, 1, 2013 we received our letters like other Alabamians about our new premiums and plans for 2014 from Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) of Alabama. When I opened our letter to say I had sticker shock was an understatement. Our premiums for the Blue Saver Silver would now be $753.26. This included the ACA tax but did not include the additional $75.00 we would need to pay in order to keep dental for me and my husband. So we would need to pay total $828.26 to keep health and dental insurance for the four of us. This payment is roughly $64.00 less than what we pay for our mortgage each month. I was outraged that anyone thought we could afford this. Sure we have some savings, but with that price tag we would whittle it down to almost nothing very quickly. I consider savings as a rainy day fund, a start to saving for the kid’s college, our retirement, etc. I never dreamed in a million years we would need to use it to pay our insurance premiums each month – how in the world could this help the economy too?

  Throughout the month of October we read everything we could on what our plan would cover, and tried to get the information we needed about the ACA. I was also blown away when I realized that my son’s medical care, he has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), would cost us so much more out of pocket than it was currently costing us. My son has to go to his doctor every other month for his care. If we need to see a therapist we do that monthly, so you see on top of the premiums there are other out of pocket cost we have to factor in. He is also on medication that he takes daily. His medicine is a life saver for him and helps him function like a normal seven year old, without it he can’t focus, his grades slip and his mind literally goes back to the mind of a three or four year old. When he was first put on his medicine his reading went up 20 points and he went from writing one to two sentences to paragraphs, all in the course of a week. He is a straight A student and very bright, but without the proper medical care that could slip away from him. Under our new plan for 2014 we would need to pay a $55.00 co-pay, and then it would be covered at 80 percent once we reached his deductible, which would be $2,000 individual $4,000 family. Out of pocket max numbers are $6,350 individual and $12,700 family. All of this is enough to make anyone’s head spin. We were then forced to look at other options as none of this was affordable for our family.

  I started to dig deeper into healthcare.gov. I was hearing all the horror stories through the news about the subpar website. I was reading right off their healthcare.gov Facebook page about other people’s terrible experiences trying to get coverage. Then the government announces that they are going to be working on the site and making it a better experience as well as making it more secure. They had already had three years to make this happen but they said would need the month of November to get it running right. So I waited patiently for them to get the site running so I could see if we would qualify for the subsidy and continue our health insurance through that route.

  December 6, 2013 I went to healthcare.gov and started our application. The process took me over two hours to complete. Once it was completed it came back with our results. The results were that my husband and I qualified. That my three year old qualified for All Kids and that my seven year old did not qualify for anything through the exchange (ACA). I was so confused, how could a seven year old not qualify for a subsidy? I was also confused on why they wanted me to enroll one of my children in All Kids? So, I called the number they provided to speak to a representative. I was on hold for 20 minutes when a woman answered and offered to help me with the results. She told me that it is coming back that my seven year old son did not qualify and the only thing I could do was to file an appeal. I asked her a few more questions about how this could have happened, and I was told “she does not know and that all I can do is file an appeal”. She was reading her responses to me right off of a chart that I am sure they are given. So, I ended my conversation with her and proceeded to try to wrap my head around what was happening.

  I decided to call back, this time I waited 15 minutes and spoke to a very nice gentleman who seemed to have an understanding for how the system was working. He looked up the results and said “this can’t be right, let’s start over and do an application over the phone”. So again I went through the application process. The results came back the exact same, we all qualified for something except my seven year old son. The gentleman could not understand how this could be happening and assured me it had to be a “glitch” in the system. He placed me on hold so he could speak with his supervisor on how to fix this error. I waited several minutes and when he came back he said “there was nothing more they could do tonight”. He said “we are sending your application to two different departments and that one of the departments would get back to me through a phone call with a fix to this problem”. He also told me “it could take 2-5 days but that I would receive a phone call when they had closed my case”.

  So I waited until Tuesday December 10, 2013, which was day four and called them back. I was then told it would be 2-5 business days and if I had not heard from them at that time to call back. So that is what I did, I waited till 9:00 pm on that Friday December 13, 2013 with no phone call. I called Sunday December 15th, 2013 and spoke with my 3rd supervisor who told me “they were very sorry that I had not received a phone call and they were messaging the two departments to give me a call the following day”. He also said to go ahead and file with All Kids in my state because even though they send that information to them, they have no idea when they will receive it. So Monday I went and applied for All Kids for my children, it was a similar application to the healthcare.gov site. I called them to verify that they received my application and was told they cannot access it till sometime in January. They said once they could access it that they would be in touch and if the kids qualified the coverage would retro act to January 1, 2014. So that was a little bit of good news.

  So here we are December 22, 2013, the day before the December 23rd deadline to sign up through the Health Insurance Marketplace’s Exchange. I decide I will call one last time to see what they can tell me about coverage, since I never received a phone call after my last conversation with a supervisor. I waited on hold for 1 hour and 15 minutes. I asked to speak with a supervisor and I was transferred. The supervisor pulled my file and was talking to me when she must have accidentally pressed a button and we got disconnected. I thought for sure she would call me back. That is one of the first things they ask for is your phone number. I did not receive a call back, so I call back and have to be placed on hold again to speak to someone. I waited another hour and a half before I get connected with a supervisor. She pulls up my file and tells me “there is nothing they can do and I have to wait the 90 days they have to contact me through the appeals process”. The supervisor tells me “that this whole time I have been told wrong by numerous people and that I should have been called back but that the two departments could do nothing for me”. I just have to wait the 90 days. I asked her, “so yet again an error, due to no fault of my own, has occurred all these times I have been calling and speaking with people and no one can really do anything”? She said “yes that is correct, I am sorry you have been told something different but that is all I can tell you”.

  I have never been treated so poorly by any insurance company in my whole life. I have never experienced such terrible customer service in all my years on this earth. I can’t imagine how long a company would last in this country if they followed the same protocol as the ACA/Health Insurance Marketplace does. Most companies can fix a glitch in their systems pretty easily, or can connect you to someone who can. Not the ACA/ Health Insurance Marketplace, you spend all that time on hold to just be told, so sorry but you have to wait for someone to get back to you in a 90 day time span.

  What is the most sickening thing to me is that we have been forced into the Health Insurance Marketplace’s Exchange. We wanted to continue our coverage through BSBC and pay as we always had been. But, we found out that option would not be affordable under the new Act, which is how we were forced into the Exchange. Furthermore, not only were we forced into the Exchange, but then forced again to submit an application to ALL Kids for our children. I just don’t understand how we go from being hard working middle class family who provides everything for our family to where we are today. I feel like everything that my husband and I have worked hard for is for nothing. I pray each night that we will get something resolved with our “glitch” in the system so our children will have health insurance coverage in January and by the time I have to purchase my son’s $400 a month ADHD medicine.

  I really don’t know how our government can allow this to be taking place. What if something happens and one of my boys breaks an arm, or God forbid something worse? They don’t have insurance, so I guess we will then be paying the hospital monthly if that happens. We are almost completely debit free currently and now all I see is very large medical bills in our future until the government can fix the issues with the ACA/Exchange. I would really like them to rename the Affordable Care Act, because from where I am sitting it is anything but affordable or caring for my family.

Sincerely,
Karri Kinder

 

 

HT/Young Conservatives

 

 

Update:

 

” Karri Kinder subsequently posted followups to sites that reproduced her open letter to say:

  We are now insured thru healthcare.gov. I was advised to do this even though I didn’t want to leave my children behind. That is the biggest point of my post. My children are uninsured [through] no fault of ours. As well as we didn’t want to have to go thru healthcare.gov. We have always paid our way and want to continue to do so. But at the high premiums and because what we know we will have to pay for our doctor visits and our sons with ADHD there was no way to just stick with BCBS. We have contacted All Kids [a program for children who need comprehensive, affordable health insurance]; we have done what they asked us to do. However we have never qualified for All Kids and there is no guarantee we will now. All Kids told us that they can’t even see their system right now until the new year. So they said they will be contacting us once they are able to see our application 

  My children not having coverage is the point of my open letter. They are pushing one child into All Kids and one not allowing to be covered through their site or All Kids. That means we will more than likely end up having to get him a plan by himself at the huge rate. My husband and myself went ahead and got coverage thru healthcare.gov, a cheaper plan since it will just be covering the two of us. We qualified to have $255 in subsidies. So for right now only the two of us are covered. The cost for the two of us is $205. It is not the same plan I described on my letter as we went with a cheaper plan. I can’t at the moment tell you what our final cost will be until we find out the outcome of our children. That will add to our finally number for health insurance for the whole family. Like I said before this is about children not being processed correctly and we didn’t want to be forced into the ACA. Which we have been forced to do. The alternative is to not have insurance at all. Something we have always had. I will be happy to update everyone once we know what is happening to our children and what our final cost for all of us will be. I have done everything they healthcare. Gov have instructed me to do numerous times. I will not be doing another application for the third time. This is happening to tons of people. Where one child is being denied through the exchange.”

 

 

 

 

 

The Real Cost Of ObamaCare — The Loss Of Good Doctors

 

 

” “Come on Mike, let’s save another life today,” a surgeon said to my husband about ten years later, at a small community hospital on Long Island, where he currently works. 

That was the attitude with which many hospital-based physicians would go to work. 

It was stressful but rewarding. Most physicians were able to pay off their huge education expense and eventually enjoy a comfortable lifestyle. 

Medical care costs had gone up, but those with good insurance made up for those with no insurance and doctors were generally happy to take care of everyone. 

That’s how the haves took care of the have-nots. People without insurance would be offered the best medical care at any American hospital’s emergency room, whether or not they were U.S. citizens.

Soon I fear that unbeknownst to most Americans, the good, smart, well-rested physicians won’t be there to take care of us.

I decided recently to download a slightly abridged version of The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to find out how this new legislation might affect caregivers. 

I was shocked that not one word of it addresses the human beings who are providing us with protection and care. 

In every chapter, the law just assumes that physicians will continue to practice medicine providing us with protection and care. 

In every chapter, the law just assumes that physicians will continue to practice medicine under the new rules. 

While the American Medical Association reportedly supported ObamaCare, that group represents less than 15% of American physicians.”

 

    Read the whole article . It is written by a very bright and well educated young woman who is married to a doctor and who’s brother is a doctor and so is immersed in the medical culture .

 

Illustration by Dave Granlund

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Case He Didn’t Make Himself Understood or If He Misspoke To You , The New Yorker Has Brought You This Video Record Of Exactly What The Man Said … Over And Over Again

 

 

If You Like Your Plan

 

    By now we are sure that you are aware of the administration’s sorry attempts to “qualify” Obama’s statement that you could keep it … IF … and that’s a big IF , the insurance companies continued to offer your policy . The bald-face lying that this man is allowed to perpetrate on the American public completely unchallenged , nay , facilitated by , the very media that dares lay claim to the title of “watchdog” is unfathomable to us amateur “pajama-clad , basement-dwellers” of the blogosphere .

 

Peter Wehner at Commentary says it succinctly enough …

 

” That is not, in fact, what the president said. Not by a country mile.

What Mr. Obama actually said, dozens of times, is a variation of what he said during a speech to the American Medical Association on June 15, 2009: “That means that no matter how we reform health care, we will keep this promise to the American people: If you like your doctor, you will be able to keep your doctor, period. If you like your health-care plan, you’ll be able to keep your health-care plan, period. No one will take it away, no matter what.”

But Mr. Obama is not your ordinary, run-of-the-mill fabulist. It appears as if he’s in the process of becoming an inveterate one. He was, after all, building one untruth upon another. I say that because by now it’s obvious to nearly everyone, including liberals, that the president and his aides knew that when he made his initial claim that under the Affordable Care Act you will be able to keep your health-care plan “no matter what”–that you would keep it “period”–he knew the assertion was false. Yet he repeated it over and over again. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

49-State Analysis: Obamacare To Increase Individual-Market Premiums By Average Of 41%

 

 

Know Your Rates

The Obamacare Rate Map, an interactive tool for learning about health insurance prices under the Affordable Care Act, was produced by the Manhattan Institute. Click on the graphic to visit the map.

 

 

” One of the fundamental flaws of the Affordable Care Act is that, despite its name, it makes health insurance more expensive. Today, the Manhattan Institute released the most comprehensive analysis yet conducted of premiums under Obamacare for people who shop for coverage on their own. Here’s what we learned. In the average state, Obamacare will increase underlying premiums by 41 percent. As we have long expected, the steepest hikes will be imposed on the healthy, the young, and the male. And Obamacare’s taxpayer-funded subsidies will primarily benefit those nearing retirement—people who, unlike the young, have had their whole lives to save for their health-care needs.

Eight states will enjoy average premium reductions under Obamacare: New York (-40%), Colorado (-22%), Ohio (-21%), Massachusetts (-20%), New Jersey (-19%), New Hampshire (-18%), Rhode Island (-10%), and Indiana (-3%). Most, but not all, of these states had heavily-regulated individual insurance markets prior to Obamacare, and will therefore benefit from Obamacare’s subsidies, and especially its requirement that everyone purchase health insurance or pay a fine.

The eight states that will face the biggest increases in underlying premiums are largely southern and western states: Nevada (+179%), New Mexico (+142%), Arkansas (+138%), North Carolina (+136%), Vermont (+117%), Georgia (+92%), South Dakota (+77%), and Nebraska (+74%).”

 

 

    Isn’t it peculiar how the biggest winners are nearly all blue states while the biggest losers are predominantly red ? The other thing to bear in mind is that the burden of rate hikes has primarily been foisted onto the backs of those of us who self-insure while those whose insurance is employer-provided escape largely unscathed . Yet another corporate subsidy thanks to cronyism .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obama: If You Lose Your Health Insurance, Just “Shop Around”

 

Fascist Insurance Co

 

” On Oct. 30, Pres. Obama defended Obamacare and told Americans who have lost their insurance to “shop around” for other coverage.

Millions of Americans have had their insurance coverage cancelled due to new regulations put in place by the Affordable Care Act. The president commented that these changes are necessary to provide everyone with quality coverage.

Pres. Obama stands firm behind the law. “If you’re getting one of these letters, just shop around in the new marketplace. That’s what it’s for,” Obama said. “

 

 

That’s what it’s for ? 

 

Shopping around implies choice . What are our choices ? 

 

Just 6 People Managed To Sign Up For Obamacare On The First Day

 

error-message-h_edited-1

 

” While Obama administration officials have refused to publicly disclose the number of enrollments into the Affordable Care Act, President Obama’s signature legislative achievement, a new report shows the initial figure is very low.

According to documents obtained by CBS News, just six people managed to sign up for health plans on the federal government’s troubled health care site on the first day. By the end of the second day, Wed, Oct. 2, a total of 248 people had enrolled in the federal exchanges nationwide.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Will Halloween Ad Scare Millennials Off Obamacare?

 

 

” Creepy Uncle Sam is back! And this time, he’s starring in a Halloween-themed spooktacular that’s meant to scare young adults away from enrolling in Obamacare.

Oh, you’re not familiar with Creepy Uncle Sam’s body of work? We’ll step back a bit and fill you in: He’s an actor who wears an Uncle Sam suit and an oversize, grinning head that makes him look like a freaky, patriotic garden gnome. The character is a creation of Generation Opportunity, a conservative political activist group aimed at the Millennial Generation.

He debuted in September in two ads: Creepy Uncle Sam appears at a crucial moment in health examinations, scaring the young folk who are about to be subject to that. The point was to emphasize Generation Opportunity’s belief that the Affordable Care Act injects too much government into the health-care marketplace.

Critics complained the treatment was so heavy-handed that the ads might have the effect of turning young people away from conservatives. For instance, in one ad Creepy Uncle Sam, snapping a speculum, approaches a young woman in an examination room. In another, he approaches a young man under similar circumstances, while snapping a rubber glove.

Creepy, yes. Also widely viewed. These two ads have been seen a combined 3.5 million times on YouTube. Their number of thumbs-down “dislikes” on the site outnumbers their “likes” by about 25 percent.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From The Start, Signs Of Trouble At Health Portal

 

 

” In March, Henry Chao, the chief digital architect for the Obama administration’s new online insurance marketplace, told industry executives that he was deeply worried about the Web site’s debut. “Let’s just make sure it’s not a third-world experience,” he told them.

Two weeks after the rollout, few would say his hopes were realized.

For the past 12 days, a system costing more than $400 million and billed as a one-stop click-and-go hub for citizens seeking health insurance has thwarted the efforts of millions to simply log in. The growing national outcry has deeply embarrassed the White House, which has refused to say how many people have enrolled through the federal exchange.”

” “These are not glitches,” said an insurance executive who has participated in many conference calls on the federal exchange. Like many people interviewed for this article, the executive spoke on the condition of anonymity, saying he did not wish to alienate the federal officials with whom he works. “The extent of the problems is pretty enormous. At the end of our calls, people say, ‘It’s awful, just awful.‘ ”

Deadline after deadline was missed. The biggest contractor, CGI Federal, was awarded its $94 million contract in December 2011. But the government was so slow in issuing specifications that the firm did not start writing software code until this spring, according to people familiar with the process. “

Who could have seen this coming ? Not the Times , that’s for sure , nor the unions , nor the celebrities .

Delaware Celebrates: First Person Finally Enrolls In Obamacare

 

 

 

” Delaware has finally signed up someone for Obamacare. This has caused officials in that state to celebrate, according to the Associated Press.

“Department of Health and Social Service officials have declared 59-year-old Janice Baker of Selbyville the first confirmed resident to enroll in the marketplace. It opened Oct. 1 as part of the roll-out of the Affordable Care Act.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KOS DIARIST GETS OBAMACARE BILL: ‘WHAT THE HELL KIND OF REFORM IS THIS?

 

 

 

 

    Regulations this extensive can’t come cheap , and don’t forget how voluminous the bill itself was . So large in fact that none of the idiots who call themselves “leaders” even bothered to read it in it’s entirety .

    Another thing to make note of is the fact that these 2.3 million words(and growing) making up the regulations cannot even be attributed to elected officials . All of the regs are propagated by unelected/unaccountable bureaucrats … That’s a wonderful thought , isn’t it ?

 

 

” Over at the hard-left Daily Kos, diarist Tirge Caps, who has a years-long history as a reliable left-wing Daily Kos diarist, lashed out at ObamaCare. After receiving a notice that said his monthly health insurance premiums will nearly double, Caps writes, “I am canceling insurance for us and I am not paying any f***ing penalty. What the hell kind of reform is this?

My wife and I just got our updates from Kaiser telling us what our 2014 rates will be. Her monthly has been $168 this year, mine $150. We have a high deductible. We are generally healthy people who don’t go to the doctor often. I barely ever go. The insurance is in case of a major catastrophe. “

   We’re finding out what is in it now … Happy folks ?

We Paid $634 Million For The Obamacare Sites And All We Got Was This Lousy 404

 

Healthcare.gov error

 

” It’s been one full week since the flagship technology portion of the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) went live. And since that time, the befuddled beast that is Healthcare.gov has shutdown, crapped out, stalled, and mis-loaded so consistently that its track record for failure is challenged only by Congress.

The site itself, which apparently underwent major code renovations over the weekend, still rejects user logins, fails to load drop-down menus and other crucial components for users that successfully gain entrance, and otherwise prevents uninsured Americans in the 36 states it serves from purchasing healthcare at competitive rates – Healthcare.gov’s primary purpose. The site is so busted that, as of a couple days ago, the number of people that successfully purchased healthcare through it was in the “single digits,” according to the Washington Post.

The exact cost to build Healthcare.gov, according to U.S. government records, appears to have been $634,320,919, which we paid to a company you probably never heard of: CGI FederalThe company originally won the contract back in 2011, but at that time, the cost was expected to run “up to” $93.7 million – still a chunk of change, but nothing near where it ended up.” “

 

    To give the reader some perspective here are the costs of some of the more popular websites that actually work as advertised .

 

“Given the complicated nature of federal contracts, it’s difficult to make a direct comparison between the cost to develop Healthcare.gov and the amount of money spent building private online businesses. But for the sake of putting the monstrous amount of money into perspective, here are a few figures to chew on: Facebook, which received its first investment in June 2004, operated for a full six years before surpassing the $600 million mark in June 2010. Twitter, created in 2006, managed to get by with only $360.17 million in total funding until a $400 million boost in 2011. Instagram ginned up just $57.5 million in funding before Facebook bought it for (a staggering) $1 billion last year. And LinkedIn and Spotify, meanwhile, have only raised, respectively, $200 million and $288 million.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Young Americans Upset That Obamacare Costs More Money

 

 

” Obamacare’s been stumbling along at quasi-full force for over a week now, and for some Americans, the Affordable Care Act is not all it was cracked up to be:

Disillusionment

     The Daily Caller has lots of whiny tweets from Obamaniacs who have had their kool-aid sippy cups punctured on the rocks of Obamacare .

Obamacare Unintended Consequences

 

 

 

” Critics say the Affordable Care Act, with its employer mandate to provide health insurance, gives businesses an incentive to cut workers’ hours. This year, report after report has rolled in about employers restricting work hours to fewer than 30 per week — the point where the mandate kicks in. Data also point to a record low workweek in low-wage industries.

In the interest of an informed debate, we’ve compiled a list of job actions with strong proof that ObamaCare’s employer mandate is behind cuts to work hours or staffing levels. As of Sept. 25, our ObamaCare scorecard included 313 employers. Here’s our latest analysis, focusing on cuts to adjunct hours at nearly 200 college campuses. The ObamaCare list methodology is explained further in our initial coverage; click on the employer names in the list below for links to supporting records, mostly news accounts or official documents.”

 

 

 

State Employer Action Jobs with fewer hours, if specified Date of Action or Report
Alabama Houston County Public Cut hours of part-time employees to fewer than 30 per week Sep-13
California Biola University Private Cut student work hours to a maximum of 25 per week; suspended limit due to employer mandate delay Sep-13
Florida Bealls Inc. (Department Stores) Private Restricted part-time hours to fewer than 30 per week Sep-13
Florida SeaWorld Entertainment Private Cut hours for part-time workers from a maximum of 32 to 28 per week Sep-13
Illinois Palmer Place Restaurant Private Cut hours for some workers below 30 per week Sep-13
Kansas Salina Family YMCA Private Cut part-time employee schedules to a maximum of 25 hours per week 20 Sep-13
New Jersey Middletown Township Public Schools Public Cut hours for paraprofessionals below 30 per week 178 Sep-13
Texas Sam Houston State University Public Limited student work hours to 29 per week, impacting multiple-job holders Sep-13
Michigan Auburn Hills Public Reduced hours for part-time, seasonal workers to fewer than 30 per week Sep-13
Pennsylvania Friendship Community (group home for adults with disabilities) Private Cut part-time hours below 30 per week 20 Sep-13
Michigan Meridian Public Schools Public Cut schedules of hourly workers to fewer than 30 hours per week 15 Sep-13
Arizona Michael Monti’s La Casa Vieja steakhouse Private Shifting more workers to fewer than 30 hours per week Sep-13
Pennsylvania Hollywood Casino Private Cut part-timers to fewer than 30 hours per week Sep-13
Arizona Arizona State University Public Limited course loads for non-tenured associate faculty members Aug-13
Maine Mainesubway (Subway franchisee) Private Reduced worker hours to no more than 29 per week 50 Aug-13
New York Finger Lakes Community College Public Capped course loads for adjunct faculty Aug-13
South Carolina Tsunami Surf Shops Private Will limit workers to fewer than 30 hours per week Aug-13
Illinois Southern Illinois University Public Limited graduate teaching assistants to 20 hours per week Aug-13
Indiana Vincennes Public Cut hours of part-timers to 29 per week Aug-13
California Mexican American Opportunity Foundation Private Cut hours of employees working up to 39 hours a week to less than 30 Aug-13
Georgia Georgia Military College Public Cut hours of adjunct faculty to below 30 per week Aug-13
Illinois Vcm Inc. (Subway franchisee) Private Reduced hours for hourly wage earners to below 30 per week Aug-13
Indiana Ball State University Public Limited work hours for graduate assistants Aug-13
New Jersey Tom’s River Public Will cut part-time hours to 25 per week, effective July 2014 Aug-13
North Carolina Forsyth Technical Community College Public Reduced hours for adjunct faculty to below 30 per week Aug-13
North Carolina Wilkes Community College Public Reduced teaching loads for adjunct faculty to below 30 hours per week and had to cut some courses as a result Aug-13
Texas Consolidated Restaurant Operations Inc Private Limiting hours for new employees Aug-13
Texas Dave & Buster’s Private Cut hours of some employees to 28 per week Aug-13
Pennsylvania Philadelphia University Private Capped hours for adjunct faculty at fewer than 30 per week, effective 2015 Aug-13
Virginia K-VA-T Food Stores Private Capped hours for part-time employees at under 30 per week Aug-13
Missouri Three Rivers College Public Capped teaching loads for adjunct faculty Aug-13
New Jersey Bergen Community College Public Limited adjunct course loads Aug-13
Alabama University of Alabama Public Capped student work hours at 20 per week Jul-13
Florida Brevard County Public Reducing hours for most of 138 part-time workers who work more than 30 hours per week 37 Jul-13
Florida Buca di Beppo restaurant chain Private Reduced hours to below 30 per week 400 Jul-13
Florida Hillsborough Community College Public Cut hours of some part-time faculty members 100 Jul-13
Florida St. Petersburg College Public Capped courseloads for adjunct facutly to equivalent of 27 hours per week 91 Jul-13
Georgia Cherokee County School Board Public Outsourced custodial services and ground maintenance Jul-13
Indiana Hancock County Public Capped hours for part-time workers at 29 per week Jul-13
Indiana Morgan County Public Cut part-time hours from a maximum of 35 to 28 per week Jul-13
Michigan Central Michigan University Public Limited hours for student workers to 25 per week 140 Jul-13
New Jersey NEMF trucking company Private Cut hours for dock workers and customer service reps from 33 per week to a maximum of 29 400 Jul-13
North Carolina Henderson Public Limited hours part-timers can work to less than 30 per week Jul-13
Ohio White Castle Private Will limit new hires to part-time Jul-13
Oregon Shari’s restaurants Private Adding part-time workers, cutting hours for some working more than 30 hours per week Jul-13
Pennsylvania Carnegie Museum Private Reduced hours for some part-time employees below 30 per week 48 Jul-13
Tennessee Oneida Special School District Public Cut most non-certified employees to 29 hours per week, but kept pay the same 65 Jul-13
Tennessee Scott County School System Public Capped hours of new non-certified hires below 30 per week Jul-13
Tennessee Stewart County School System Public Reduced hours for school support staff to 28 per week 120 Jul-13
Texas Jim’s Restaurants Private Intends to reduce hours of some workers; put plan on hold due to employer mandate delay Jul-13
Virginia Christoper Savvides restaurant & catering co. Private Stopped hiring full-time and limited part-timers’ hours Jul-13
Wisconsin Minocqua-Hazelhurst-Lake Tomahawk School District Public Capped part-time hours below 30 per week Jul-13
Wisconsin Trig’s Supermarkets Private Cut hours for part-time workers below 30 per week. Jul-13
Alabama University of North Alabama Public Capped work hours at 29 per week for student employees Jul-13
California Fatburger Private Cut some workers to sub-30 hours per week Jul-13
Iowa Lee County Public Enforced existing part-time cap of 28 hours per week Jul-13
Michigan Delta County Public Capped part-time hours at 29 per week; made temporary exemption for corrections officers after mandate delay Jul-13
Texas Bee County Public Reduce part-time employee hours to 24 per week. Jul-13
Idaho Boundary County Public Cut hours for part-timers to fewer than 30 per week Jul-13
North Carolina Rutherford County Public Lowered cap on part-time hours from 37 to 29 per week Jul-13
Pennsylvania Lawrence County Public Capped part-time hours at 28 per week; later reversed move for deputies Jul-13
Michigan Kenowa Hills Public Schools Public Outsourced school bus transportation, partly to avoid providing health benefits to 30 drivers Jul-13
New Jersey City of Burlington Public Schools Public Outsourced provision of paraprofessionals and substitute teachers Jul-13
Texas Lion & Rose British Restaurant and Pub Private Cut hourly full-time workers’ schedules to 28 hours per week Jul-13
Texas MTC Inc. restaurant management Private Shifted to only hiring part-time workers Jul-13
Utah Millard School District Public Cut hours for paraprofessionals from 6 to 5.75 per day 6 Jul-13
Arkansas Pulaski Technical College Public Capped course loads for adjunct faculty Jul-13
California San Diego Community College District Public Restricted student employees and other non-academic workers to no more than 25 hours per week Jul-13
Missouri Drury University Private Limited adjunct course loads Jul-13
Tennessee Cumberland University Private Capped course loads for adjunct faculty at 27 hours per week Jul-13
Arkansas Area Agency on Aging of Western Arkansas, Inc. Private Cut hours for staff of 500 home health aides and drivers to 28 per week Jun-13
Arkansas Wal-Mart Stores Inc. Private Increased temp share of workforce to “fewer than 10%” from 1-2% before this year Jun-13
California CKE Restaurants Inc. Private Increasing part-time workforce by replacing full-time workers through attrition Jun-13
California Kern County Public Will limit work schedules for up to 800 extra-help workers or reduce workforce Jun-13
California Rancho Cucamonga Public Cut hours for most part-time workers below 30 per week 30 Jun-13
California San Gabriel Public Reduced hours for part-timers to fewer than 30 per week. Jun-13
Florida Palm Beach State College Public Cut hours for 100 part-timers to 27.5 per week; 895 adjuncts limited to 60% of a full-time course load 200 Jun-13
Florida Santa Fe College Public Capped part-time hours at 27.5 per week and enforced limits on adjunct course loads Jun-13
Florida Tallahassee Community College Public Cut hours of some part-time workers to as low as 24 per week Jun-13
Illinois Parkland College Public Limited hours for part-time, non-teaching employees to 27.5 per week Jun-13
Indiana Clay County Public Capped part-time work at 28 hours per week Jun-13
Indiana DeKalb County Public Limited part-timers to 28 hours per week Jun-13
Indiana Eastbrook Community Schools Public Cut hours for instructional aides to 29.5 per week from between 32.5 and 35. 39 Jun-13
Indiana Floyd County Public Cutting hours for up to 72 part-timers to 28 hours per week Jun-13
Indiana Highland Public Limited hours part-time employees can work to fewer than 30 per week; suspended limit due to employer mandate delay Jun-13
Indiana Indiana University Public Capped hours for part-timers at 29 per week; outsourced 50 maintenance personnel Jun-13
Indiana Ivy Tech Community College Public Limited hours for adjunct faculty at 23 campuses to avoid estimated $10 million in Affordable Care Act costs for those who work 30 or more hours Jun-13
Indiana Kosciusko County Public Capped part-time hours at 25 per week Jun-13
Indiana Lakeview Christian School Private Limited new part-timers to 29 hours per week Jun-13
Indiana Madison Consolidated Schools Public Cut hours for cafeteria workers, instructional aides and bus drivers below 30 per week Jun-13
Indiana Madison-Grant United School Corp. Public Cut hours for non-certified staff from up to 35 hours per week to below 30 Jun-13
Indiana Marshall County Public Cut hours for part-times to 28 per week Jun-13
Indiana Mississinewa Community Schools Public Cut 15 minutes per day for three teacher aides 3 Jun-13
Indiana Perry Central School Corp. Public Cut hours of part-time instructional assistants by 6 per week, with offsetting wage hike Jun-13
Indiana Shelbyville Central School System Public Cut hours instructional aides, substitute teachers, bus drivers and coaches below 30 per week 100 Jun-13
Indiana Speedway Schools Public Cut hours for teaching assistants to 29 per week with offsetting pay hike 30 Jun-13
Indiana Starke County Public Cut hours for part-timers to maximum of 130 per month Jun-13
Indiana Wolfe’s Auto Auction Private Some full-time workers cut to part-time; part-time hours capped at 28 per week 10 Jun-13
Iowa Spencer Community School District Public Reduced hours for some part-timers from 32 to below 30 per week 65 Jun-13
Kentucky Lexington Board of Education Public Cut hours of some part-timers to 28.5 per week, providing offsetting raise 20 Jun-13
Maryland Howard Community College Public Lowered limit on course loads and hours worked for adjunct faculty Jun-13
Michigan Russ’ Restaurant Private Cut hours of non-managing employees to maximum of 25 hours per week Jun-13
Missouri Maritz Research Private Cut part-time hours to 25 per week Jun-13
Nebraska Blair Community Schools Public Cut hours for bus drivers and teacher aides to no more than 29 per week Jun-13
Nebraska Plattsmouth Board of Education Public Capped hours of non-certified employees at 29 per week Jun-13
New Jersey Little Falls Board of Education Public Capped hours of paraprofessionals below 30 per week Jun-13
Ohio Lake Township Public Capped part-time hours at 28.8 per week Jun-13
Ohio Lebanon City Public Cut hours of part-time firefighters/paramedics 18 Jun-13
Ohio Mason Public Cut part-time workers to 20 hours per week 200 Jun-13
Ohio Scrambler Marie’s Restaurants Private Cut some workers’ hours to less than 30 per week Jun-13
Ohio Westlake Public Limit part-timers to 25 hours per week 23 Jun-13
Pennsylvania East Penn School District Public Reduced hours for 11 food service workers to 29.75 per week 11 Jun-13
Pennsylvania Southern Lehigh School District Public Cut hours of 51 part-time employees to under 30 per week 51 Jun-13
Pennsylvania Tredyffrin-Easttown School District Public Cut hours for part-time aides and paraprofessionals to 27.5 per week; suspended cuts due to employer mandate delay 135 Jun-13
South Carolina Kelly Professional Cleaning Services Private ObamaCare employer penalties “will have to be recovered from existing employees in the reduction of hours, wage rates and layoffs” Jun-13
South Carolina Spartanburg Community College Public Cut hours for most adjunct faculty below 30 90 Jun-13
Texas Matagorda County Public Cut hours part-timer can work from 40 per week to 29 Jun-13
Texas Wilson County Public Cut part-timers to a maximum of 29 hours per week Jun-13
Utah Murray School District Public Cut part-time hours to a maximum of 20 per week Jun-13
Utah Nebo School District Public Cut hours for part-timers to 28.75 per week and stop providing insurance for some 40 Jun-13
Virginia Henrico Country School District Public Limit hours for part-timers and temps to 29 per week Jun-13
Virginia Lynchburg Public Cut hours for part-timers from about 32 per week to 28 35 Jun-13
Washington DC Clyde’s Restaurant Group Private Shifting mix of workers toward more part-timers Jun-13
Indiana Eminence Community Schools Public Cut hours for part-timers to a maximum of 29 per week Jun-13
Minnesota Faribault Public Cut hours of employees working 30-to-38 hours per week to 29; temporarily delayed move due to delay of employer mandate 4 Jun-13
Indiana Lafayette School Corp. Public Cut part-time hours below 30 per week 235 Jun-13
Indiana Martin County Public Capped part-time hours at 28 per week Jun-13
Michigan Baldwin Public Library Public Capped part-time hours at 28 per week Jun-13
Minnesota Hayfield Community Schools Public Cut hours of paraprofessionals to fewer than 30 per week, with $1/hr raise; rescinded policy after mandate delay 20 Jun-13
Virginia Rappahannock Area Community Services Board Public Cut hours for part-timers to a maximum of 29 per week 45 Jun-13
Indiana Benton Community Schools Public Cut hours for uninsured part-timers to fewer than 30 per week with offsetting pay hike Jun-13
New Jersey Pompton Lakes Board of Education Public Cut hours for instructional aides below 30 per week, with offsetting pay hike 48 Jun-13
New Jersey Sparta Area Schools Public Cut hours for paraprofessionals below 30 per week; postponed cuts after one-year delay of employer mandate Jun-13
Pennsylvania Brandywine Heights Area School District Public Outsourced instructional aides working 30 hours per week Jun-13
Utah Southern Utah Unversity Public Limited hourly workers, including students, to 20 hours per week and capped adjunct teaching loads Jun-13
Arkansas Arkansas State University Public Limited adjunct course loads and reduced hours for part-time employees, including students, to a maximum of 28 per week Jun-13
Texas Texas Christian University Private Reduced hours for adjunct faculty and part-time employees, including students, to fewer than 30 per week Jun-13
Arizona Maricopa Community Colleges Public Reduced hours of 700 adjunct faculty and 600 part-time workers below 30 per week 1300 May-13
Arizona University of Arizona in Tucson Public Limited hours temporary employees may work in a year 500 May-13
California Long Beach Public Reducing hours to 27 per week for up to 200 part-timers May-13
Georgia Circle K Southeast Private Cut hours of some full-time employees below 30 May-13
Illinois College of DuPage Public Cut course loads for some adjunct faculty May-13
Illinois McHenry County College Public Cut course loads for adjunct faculty to 24 hours per week May-13
Indiana Eastern Hancock School Board Public Limit most non-contract employees who worked 30 to 39 hours per week to 29. May-13
Indiana Fayette County School Corp. Public Cut hours for some part-timers to 27.5 per week 90 May-13
Indiana Fort Wayne Community Schools Public Cut hours of part-time teaching aides and cafeteria workers from 30 to 25 per week 610 May-13
Indiana Gibson County Public Cut part-time hours from a maximum of 40 to 23.5 per week May-13
Indiana Greencastle Community Schools Public Cut hours of instructional aides and cafeteria workers to 29.5 per week 54 May-13
Indiana Hancock Madison Shelby Educational Services Public Cut hours for special ed assistants from 35-37.5 per week to 28 48 May-13
Indiana Tipton County Public Cut maximum number of hours to 28 per week from 32 May-13
Indiana Vigo County School Corp. Public Cut hours of non-certified employees below 30 per week, leading to sharp cut-backs in field trips; suspended hour cuts in response to delay of employer mandate May-13
Indiana White River Valley School District Public Cut hours of non-certified employees from 30 to 29 per week 11 May-13
Indiana Zionsville Community Schools Public Cut hours for instructional aides, coaches, and substitutes to a maximum of 29 per week 100 May-13
Iowa Indianola Community School District Public Part-time hours cut for up to 125 below 30 per week May-13
Iowa Tama County Public Cut hours for part-time employees to less than 30 per week May-13
Kansas Kansas Turnpike Authority Public Toll collectors limited to 24 hours per week; up to 93 will see hours cut May-13
Maryland Republic Foods (Burger King franchise operator) Private All new hires capped at 29 hours per week May-13
Michigan Birmingham Public Cut seasonal employee hours below average of 30 per week May-13
Michigan Dearborn Public Capped hours of part-time and seasonal employees at average of 28 per week May-13
Michigan Iosco County Public apped hours of part-time employees at 28 per week May-13
Michigan Tuscola County Public Capped part-time hours at less than 30 per week May-13
Nebraska Douglas County West Community Schools Public Cut part-time shifts by about 45 minutes a day 12 May-13
Nebraska Papillion-La Vista school district Public Cut part-time hours below 30 per week 281 May-13
Nebraska Westside Community Schools Public Capped hours of most part-time employees below 30 per week May-13
North Carolina Carlie C’s Private Cut part-time hours below 30 per week for up to 150 workers May-13
Ohio Sinclair Community College Public Reduced hours for part-timers to maximum of 28 per week and cut course loads for adjunct faculty May-13
Ohio Tipp City Public Cut hours for part-timers to fewer than 30 per week 18 May-13
Pennsylvania Ephrata Area School District Public Capped hours of part-time workers below 30 per week. May-13
Texas Dallas County Community College District Public Capped courseloads for 2,500 adjunct faculty members May-13
Texas Plano Public Cut part-time hours below 30 per week 45 May-13
Utah Alpine School District Public Cut part-time hours to a maximum of 27.5 per week, avoiding $4.2 million cost 800 May-13
Utah Deseret Industries (work training for war refugees) Private Cut hours of most workers below 30 per week May-13
Virginia Wise County School Board Public Limit hours for part-time workers to fewer than 30 per week May-13
Wisconsin Mount Horeb Area School District Public Cut paraprofessional hours to 25 per week 36 May-13
California Tehama County Public Limited extra-help employee work hours to fewer than 30 per week May-13
Indiana Crawford County Public Lowered cap on part-time hours from 32 to 29 per week May-13
Indiana Vanderburgh County Public Lowered cap on part-time hours from 39 to 29 per week May-13
Virginia Campbell County Social Services Dept. Public Cut hours of family educators, companion providers and part-timers to 29 per week May-13
Virginia Dickenson County Public Schools Public Cut hours for part-timers to a maximum of 29 per week May-13
Virginia Grayson County Public Cut hours for part-timers to a maximum of 28 per week May-13
Virginia Strasburg Public Lowered cap on part-time hours from 35 to 29 per week May-13
Virginia Wythe County Public Cut hours for part-timers to a maximum of 28 per week May-13
Indiana North Putnam Community Schools Public Cut hours of noncertified employees to a maximum of 29 per week May-13
Indiana Northwestern School Corp. Public Cut hours of instructional assistants to 25 per week 12 May-13
Indiana Taylor Community Schools Public Cut hours of cafeteria workers, custodians and teaching aides to 28 per week 31 May-13
New Jersey Hanover Township Public Cut part-time hours to a maximum of 28 per week; rescinded rule after delay of mandate May-13
New Jersey Middletown Township Public Cut part-time hours to fewer than 30 per week 25 May-13
Utah Cedar City Public Capped hours for part-timers and seasonal workers at 28 per week May-13
Pennsylvania Dallas School District Public Capped hours for teacher aides at fewer than 30 per week May-13
New Mexico New Mexico State University Public Capped graduate-student work hours at 25 per week May-13
Pennsylvania General McLane School District Public Capped part-time hours below 30 per week, affecting secretaries, instructional and library aides, and cafeteria and custodial workers May-13
West Virginia Blue Ridge Community And Technical College Public Capped adjunct teaching loads, limiting work hours to no more than 29 per week May-13
Colorado Fountain Fire Dept. Public Cut hours of part-timers to a maximum of 29 per week 6 May-13
California North of the River Recreation and Park District Public Cut hours for part-time workers below 30 per week 12 Apr-13
Colorado Charco Broiler Private Trimmed work hours to stay below 50 full-time equivalent threshold 3 Apr-13
Colorado Durango Public Limiting part-timers to 27 hours per week to avoid $900,000 in additional health care costs. Apr-13
Colorado Mountain Del (Del Taco franchisee) Private cutting full-time workforce by 100; capping part-timers at 28 hours per week 100 Apr-13
Florida Daytona State College Public Reduced hours for adjunct faculty Apr-13
Illinois Moraine Valley Community College Public Cutting course loads for adjunct faculty Apr-13
Indiana Bartholomew County Public Cut part-time hours to 28 hours per week 40 Apr-13
Indiana Delaware County Public Limited part-time employees to 29 hours per week Apr-13
Indiana Northwestern Consolidated School District Public Cut part-time hours to a maximum of 29 per week 41 Apr-13
Indiana Richland-Bean Blossom Community School Corp. Public Instructional aides limited to 29.5 hours per week Apr-13
Iowa Clear Lake School Board Public Outsourced provision of substitute teachers and paraprofessionals Apr-13
Maryland Ocean City Public Reduced hours for part-time workers to a maximum of 28 per week 40 Apr-13
Michigan Kalamazoo Valley Community College Public Reduced maximum hours for part-time faculty Apr-13
Michigan St. Clair Community College Public Limited hours of adjunct professors and part-time support staff to fewer than 30 per week Apr-13
Missouri Moberly Area Community College Public Reduced number of courses adjunct faculty are eligible to teach. Apr-13
Nebraska Ralston School District Public Cut hours for paraprofessionals to below 30 per week Apr-13
Nebraska Springfield Platteview Community Schools Public Cut 7.5 hour days to less than 6 hours for paraprofessionals 43 Apr-13
New Hampshire Community College System of New Hampshire Public Capped adjunct faculty hours at 27 per week Apr-13
New Jersey Franklin Township Board of Education Public Voted to outsource school aides and child study team services Apr-13
New York Waldbaum’s Supermarket Private Cut hours and health care for most full-time employees below 30 per week Apr-13
Ohio Cuyahoga Community College Public Capped hours for 1,559 part-timers at 20 per week Apr-13
Ohio University of Akron Public Cut course loads for part-time faculty 230 Apr-13
Ohio Upper Arlington City School District Public Cutting hours for aides who work with disabled students from 32.5 per week to 28 Apr-13
Pennsylvania Firstaff Nursing Services Inc. Private Plans to cut full-time nurses and nursing assistantsto part-time and hire more part-timers 100 Apr-13
Pennsylvania Lancaster County School District Public Outsourced 100 of classroom aides and food service workers to a private company Apr-13
Pennsylvania Penn Manor School District Public Outsourced 96 special-ed aides plus provision of substitute teachers to a private firm Apr-13
Pennsylvania Susquenita School District Public Cut part-time hours from 30 per week to 29.5 61 Apr-13
Tennessee Regal Entertainment Group Private Operator of 500+ movie theaters cut non-salaried worker hours below 30 per week Apr-13
Utah Brigham Young University Private Capped hours for part-timers, including students, at an average of 29 per week. Apr-13
Virginia Chesterfield Public Schools Public Cut hours for part-timers to a maximum of 28 per week 2000 Apr-13
Wisconsin Chippewa County Public Cut part-time hours below 30 per week 15 Apr-13
Virginia Tazewell County Public Lowered cap on part-time hours from 32 to 29 per week Apr-13
Indiana Eastern Greene Schools Public Cut hours for hourly employees, such as teaching aides, custodians and bus drivers to a maximum of 28 per week 40 Apr-13
Michigan Portage Public Capped part-time hours at 28 per week Apr-13
Michigan Vassar Public Schools Public Cut hours for food-service workers to maximum of 29 per week Apr-13
Virginia Richmond Public Schools Public Cut part-time hours to a maximum of 28 per week Apr-13
Virgina Spotsylvania County Public Cut hours for part-timers to a maximum of 28 per week 40 Apr-13
Kentucky Joe Bologna’s Italian Pizzeria & Restaurant Private Closed for business on Monday, reducing employees to fall below 50 full-time-equivalent threshold Apr-13
New Jersey Clinton-Glen Gardner School District Public Cut hours for paraprofessionals from 35 to 28 per week; in July a judge ordered the board to rescind its action Apr-13
Illinois Elmhurst College Private Cut two courses per semester from maximum adjunct teaching load Apr-13
Ohio Columbus State Community College Public Reduced hours for adjunct faculty and hourly wage earners to fewer than 30 per week Apr-13
Georgia AAA Parking Private Moved half of full-time workers to part-time 250 Mar-13
Illinois Boone Community School District Public Cut hours of part-time employees below 30 per week 30 Mar-13
Illinois Joliet Junior College Public Cut course loads for adjunct faculty Mar-13
Michigan Van Buren Township Public Capped part-time hours at 29 per week Mar-13
Minnesota Mankato Public Limited part-time hours to 29 per week. Mar-13
New York Hudson Valley Community College Public Cut hours of part-time faculty Mar-13
North Carolina Five Guys Burgers and Fries franchise Private Plans to cut hours or positions among 60 workers clocking more than 30 hours per week Mar-13
Ohio Akron Public Limiting part-timers to fewer than 30 hours per week. Mar-13
Ohio Baldwin-Wallace University Private Limited course load of adjunct faculty Mar-13
Ohio Kent State University Public Limited course load of adjunct faculty Mar-13
Ohio Lakeland Community College Public Limited course loads for adjunct faculty Mar-13
Ohio Youngstown City Schools Public Cut part-time and substitute hours to 25 per week Mar-13
Pennsylvania Lori’s Angels home care Private Cut hours of part-time workers to 29.5 and shifted to only hiring part-time Mar-13
Utah Granite School District Public Cut hours for part-time school support staff to below 30 per week 1000 Mar-13
Virginia Chesterfield County Public Cut hours for up to “several hundred” part-timers to 28 per week 115 Mar-13
Virginia Louisa County Public Cut hours for part-time and seasonal employees to 29 per week 140 Mar-13
Ohio Bowling Green State University Public Capped part-time hours at 24 per week and student work hours at 28 Mar-13
Ohio Medina City Schools Public Cut weekly hours for cafeteria workers and teacher aides from 30 to 28.75 per week 16 Mar-13
Pennsylvania Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Public Capped part-time hours at 29 per week Mar-13
Ohio Fairview Park Public Cut hours of part-time employees to fewer than 30 per week Mar-13
Ohio Shawnee State University Public Reduced maximum teaching load for adjunct faculty Mar-13
Florida Miami Dade College Public Enforcing cap of 25 hours per week for part-time workers Feb-13
Indiana Putnam County Public Cut hours for part-time workers to maximum of 29 per week Feb-13
Nebraska Cutchall Management restaurant company Private Capped new part-time hires at 28 hours per week; lifted cap after delay of employer mandate Feb-13
New Jersey Mount Ephraim Board of Education Public Cut paraprofessionals’ hours from 6 per day to 5.5 Feb-13
New York CY Farms Private Eliminated 20 jobs to stay below 50 full-time-equivalent threshold 20 Feb-13
Ohio Brunswick Public Capped hours for part-time employees at 28 per week and limited length of employment for seasonal workers Feb-13
Ohio Medina Public Cut part-time hours from about 35 to 29 per week 65 Feb-13
Tennessee Wytheville Town Council Public Reduced limit on part-time hours from 39 per week to 28 Feb-13
Virginia Christopher Newport University Public Cut hours for part-timers and adjunct faculty to 29 per week 483 Feb-13
Virginia College of William & Mary Public Cut hours for part-timers and adjunct faculty to 29 per week 331 Feb-13
Virginia Norfolk State University Public Cut hours for part-timers and adjunct faculty to 29 per week 504 Feb-13
Virginia Virginia government (all other departments) Public Cut hours for part-time and hourly wage workers to 29 per week 1,235 Feb-13
Virginia Virginia Commonwealth University Public Cut hours for part-timers and adjunct faculty to 29 per week 883 Feb-13
Virginia Virginia Community College System Public Cut hours for part-timers and adjunct faculty to 29 per week 1,479 Feb-13
Virginia Virginia Dept. of Alcoholic Beverage Control Public Cut hours for part-time and hourly wage workers to 29 per week 605 Feb-13
Virginia Virginia Dept. of Conservation and Recreation Public Cut hours for part-time and hourly wage workers to 29 per week 500 Feb-13
Virginia Virginia Employment Commission Public Cut hours for part-time and hourly wage workers to 29 per week 433 Feb-13
Tennessee Washington County Public Reduced hours for part-timers to fewer than 30 per week Feb-13
Virginia Wytheville Public Lowered cap on part-time hours from 39 to 28 per week Feb-13
Wisconsin Land’s End Private Reduced hours for part-timers to a maximum of 29 per week Feb-13
Virginia Dept. of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services Public Cut hours for wage employees to a maximum of 29 per week Feb-13
Virginia Dept. of Motor Vehicles Public Cut hours for wage employees to a maximum of 29 per week Feb-13
Virginia George Mason University Public Cut hourly wage workers, including students and adjuncts, to a maximum of 29 hours per week Feb-13
Virginia James Madison University Public Cut hourly wage workers, including students and adjuncts, to a maximum of 29 hours per week Feb-13
Virginia Longwood University Public Cut hourly wage workers, including students and adjuncts, to a maximum of 29 hours per week Feb-13
Virginia Old Dominion University Public Cut hourly wage workers, including students and some adjuncts, to a maximum of 29 hours per week Feb-13
Virginia Radford University Public Capped teaching loads for adjunct faculty Feb-13
Virginia University of Mary Washington Public Cut hourly wage workers, including students and adjuncts, to a maximum of 29 hours per week Feb-13
Wisconsin Lomira School District Public Reduced hours for classified staff to 29 per week Feb-13
Pennsylvania Lancaster County Public Limited part-time hours to a maximum of 29 per week Feb-13
Utah Utah Valley University Public Limited hourly workers to a maximum of 28 hours per week and capped adjunct teaching loads Feb-13
Georgia Columbus Public Capped hours for part-time and seasonal employees at 29 per week Jan-13
Illinois Illinois Valley Community College Public Capped hours for part-timers at 29 per week Jan-13
Michigan Milford Township Public Cut hours for part-timers to 28 per week Jan-13
Michigan New Baltimore Public Cut hours for part-timers, including police cadets, to 28 per week Jan-13
Nebraska Omega Foods Inc. (Wendy’s franchisee) Private Cut hours to 28 per week for non-management 100 Jan-13
Ohio Tallmadge Public Cut hours part-timers can work to 29 per week Jan-13
Oklahoma Treadwell Enterprises (Taco Bell franchise operator) Private Reduced hours for some full-time workers to part-time Jan-13
California Lake County Public Cut hours for extra-help employees to a limit of 25 per week Dec-12
Florida Boca Raton Public Cut hours for part-timers to 25 per week. Dec-12
Illinois Rock Valley College Public Capped hours for part-time workers at 25 per week Dec-12
Maryland Royal Farms convenience stores Private Cut hours for most full-time and part-time workers below 30 per week Dec-12
Ohio Fairlawn Public Lowered limit on part-time hours from 35 per week to less than 30 Dec-12
Maryland Chesapeake College Public Capped adjunct faculty hours at 28 per week Dec-12
Ohio Sugarcreek Township Public Capped hours at 28 per week and eliminated paid time off for part-timers Dec-12
Florida RREMC Restaurants (Denny’s franchisee) Private Cut hours for part-time workers to 28 per week Nov-12
Iowa Cedar Falls Public Cut part-time hours from 32 per week to 29 59 Nov-12
Michigan Kga Group (Subway franchisee) Private Part-time hours cut below 30 per week 60 Nov-12
New Jersey Kean University Public Cut adjunct course loads 210 Nov-12
Ohio Stark State College Public Capped hours of adjunct faculty at 29 per week Nov-12
Ohio Youngstown State University Public Capped hours of part-time employees and adjunct faculty Nov-12
Pennsylvania Community College of Allegheny County Public Cut hours for adjunct faculty and other part-time employees 400 Nov-12
Texas Pillar Hotels & Resorts Private Stepped up hiring of part-time workers among its 5,500 employees Nov-12
Georgia PMTD Restaurants LLC (a franchisee of KFC) Private Cutting hours for part-timers working 30 hours or slightly above Oct-12
Illinois Jimmy John’s Gourmet Sandwiches Private Cutting hours for part-timers below 30 per week Oct-12
Illinois Plainfield Park District Public Cut work hours to 27 per week for four part-time workers 4 Jun-12
New York Bowlmor Lanes Private Plan to shift some full-time workers to part-time and limit hours to fewer than 30 per week Mar-11
Pennsylvania West Perry School District Public Limit new instructional aides to 27.5 hours per week Jan-11

 

SEIU Unionists Strike Over Obamacare-Related Cuts

 

 

” Members of the Chicago-based Service Employees International Union Local 1 have gone on strike over recent job cuts by a janitorial company called Professional Maintenance.

The reason for the cuts? The employer says it is because of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. This is ironic since SEIU is a major supporter of the law.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roofers Union Calls For Obamacare’s Repeal

 

 

” The United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers and Allied Workers is reportedly the first union to officially call for repeal of the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. The health care law is prompting some serious buyer’s remorse in Big Labor, which worked hard on behalf of the administration to pass it:

The union’s statement can be found here. The full text is below:

United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers and Allied Workers International President Kinsey M. Robinson issued the following statement today calling for a repeal or complete reform of President Obama’s Affordable Care Act (ACA):

“Our Union and its members have supported President Obama and his Administration for both of his terms in office.

But regrettably, our concerns over certain provisions in the ACA have not been addressed, or in some instances, totally ignored. In the rush to achieve its passage, many of the Act’s provisions were not fully conceived, resulting in unintended consequences that are inconsistent with the promise that those who were satisfied with their employer sponsored coverage could keep it. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obamacare Continues To Restrict Hiring

” The Beige Book is a report published eight times a year that details the economic activity in the 12 different Federal Reserve regions. As this most recent report explains, “Employers in several Districts cited the unknown effects of the Affordable Care Act as reasons for planned layoffs and reluctance to hire more staff.”

But why is this news now? Federal Reserve presidents have cited Obamacare as a hiring hindrance for a few years now. In 2010, the Federal Reserve Bank president of Atlanta said,“We have frequently heard strong comments to the effect of ‘My company won’t hire a single additional worker until we know what health insurance costs are going to be.’” There is little more clarity on what the new costs are going to be for business owners. This is why three different Federal Reserve regions have directly linked Obamacare to slower hiring.”