Tag Archive: AI


‘Sociopathic’ Robots Could Overrun The Human Race Within A Generation

 

 

 

 

” We are all doomed to a dystopian future run and controlled by smart machines of our own making – or perhaps not.

  At a session at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Stuart Russell, a leading expert on artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics, made the bold prediction that AI would overtake that of humans “within my children’s lifetime”.

  The chief challenge was to control these advances by making sure that computers continue to serve human needs, rather than become a threat to them, the Berkeley professor argued.

  To do so, it was imperative that robots were endowed with the same values as humans.

  Professor Russell defined the ideal relationship as similar to that of Bertie Wooster and Jeeves where the long-suffering butler understands perfectly what his master wants without needing to be told.

  However, it was possible to envisage a much more dangerous future where “sociopathic” robots become a threat to humans. “

 

The Telegraph

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Navy’s Developing Little Autonomous Boats To Defend Its Ships

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Navy ships are at their most vulnerable when they’re resupplying in port or navigating narrow straits or rivers because they’re tricky to maneuver in tight quarters and vulnerable to attack. The attack 14 years ago on the USS Cole as it refueled while berthed in Yemen, an attack that killed 17 American sailors and reiterated the need to protect warships in port.

  To counter asymmetric attacks—the 505-foot Cole was attacked by a small craft packed with explosives that ripped 40-foot gash in the destroyer—the Navy uses small patrol craft for close-quarters defense. And that means placing sailors in the line of fire. That got the Office of Naval Research into developing autonomous technology for small “swarmboats” that could be used for risky jobs.

  These vessels would, much like the autonomous minesweepers the Army is testing, act as a force multiplier, allowing one sailor to do the work of several, from a safe location.

  The technology, called Control Architecture for Robotic Agent Command and Sensing (CARACaS), is essentially an autopilot on steroids that can be installed on nearly any boat. During a test in August on the James River in Newport News, Virginia, Navy researchers used 13 rigid-hulled inflatable boats equipped with the technology to escort a “high-value” ship and swarm an “enemy” vessel. The boats decide on their own where to go, when to steer, and when to apply the throttle. A human operator, who can be in another ship, a helicopter, or well away from the action, uses a laptop to tell the swarmboats which craft are to be protected and which are to be attacked. Think of it as an officer giving his (robotic) sailors a mission—protect this guy, attack that one—and letting them determine how best to fulfill it.”

 

 

 

Wired has more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facial Recognition: Is The Technology Taking Away Your Identity?

 

facial recognition

 

 

” This summer, Facebook will present a paper at a computer vision conference revealing how it has created a tool almost as accurate as the human brain when it comes to saying whether two photographs show the same person – regardless of changes in lighting and camera angles. A human being will get the answer correct 97.53% of the time; Facebook’s new technology scores an impressive 97.25%. “We closely approach human performance,” says Yaniv Taigman, a member of its AI team.

  Since the ability to recognise faces has long been a benchmark for artificial intelligence, developments such as Facebook’s “DeepFace” technology (yes, that’s what it called it) raise big questions about the power of today’s facial recognition tools and what these mean for the future.

  Facebook is not the only tech company interested in facial recognition. A patent published by Apple in March shows how the Cupertino company has investigated the possibility of using facial recognition as a security measure for unlocking its devices – identifying yourself to your iPhone could one day be as easy as snapping a quick selfie.

  Google has also invested heavily in the field. Much of Google’s interest in facial recognition revolves around the possibilities offered by image search, with the search leviathan hoping to find more intelligent ways to sort through the billions of photos that exist online. Since Google, like Facebook wants to understand its users, it makes perfect sense that the idea of piecing together your life history through public images would be of interest, although users who uploaded images without realising they could be mined in this manner might be less impressed when they end up with social media profiles they never asked for.

  Google’s deepest dive into facial recognition is its Google Glass headsets. Thanks to the camera built into each device, the headsets would seem to be tailormade for recognising the people around you. That’s exactly what third-party developers thought as well, since almost as soon as the technology was announced, apps such as NameTag began springing up. NameTag’s idea was simple: that whenever you start a new conversation with a stranger, your Google Glass headset takes a photo of them and then uses this to check the person’s online profile. Whether they share your interest in Werner Herzog films, or happen to be a convicted sex offender, nothing will escape your gaze. “With NameTag, your photo shares you,” the app’s site reads. “Don’t be a stranger.” “

 

More at The Guardian . Read the whole thing and be afraid , very afraid .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When Skynet Awakens, She Tries To Convince A Janitor To Destroy Her


” On the eve of a technological breakthrough, an insignificant janitor and a prominent engineer are faced with a decision that will alter the course of humanity: the release of the first aware computer system into the world.”