Tag Archive: American Rifleman


2013 Golden Bullseye Winners

 

 

Optic of the Year

Trijicon TARS

Trijicon Tactical Advanced Riflescope

 

 ” Of the numerous, and varied, duties of American Rifleman’s editors, few are as difficult as reviewing the past year’s new product releases and selecting the firearms, ammunition and accessories that are most deserving of the sought after American Rifleman Golden Bullseye Award.

“The Golden Bullseye Award has become a much-coveted symbol of excellence, innovation and quality in firearms, accessories and related equipment,” said Joe H. Graham, Executive Director of NRA Publications. “This year’s winning slate offers consumers the very best the shooting and hunting industry has to offer. We congratulate the winners and look forward to recognizing them at the NRA Annual Meetings in Houston.” ”

 

Read the rest and see if you agree with their selections

 

 

SMITH & WESSON MODEL 29

 

 

A Marine’s Rifle

Mawhinney is a towering figure in the sniper community because of his combat record in Vietnam.

Chuck Mawhinney was probably born to be a Marine sniper. “My father was a Marine during World War II. I started shooting at a very young age, and he taught me to shoot like the Marines taught him, so there wasn’t any big transition from hunting in Oregon to becoming a sniper.”

Mawhinney graduated from high school in 1967 and immediately joined the Marine Corps—with an agreement that he didn’t have to report until October, after deer season. He graduated from Scout Sniper School at Camp Pendleton in April of 1968 and was sent to Vietnam the next month. He started to “hunt” again almost immediately. More than three decades later, when the totals of modern American snipers were added up, it was discovered that Mawhinney had 103 confirmed kills, more than any other Marine, along with another 216 “probables.”

The Vietnam conflict resulted in many innovations in American sniper rifles. Mawhinney’s primary rifle was the M40, a modified Remington 40X bolt-action in 7.62×51 mm NATO with a Redfield 3-9X Accu-Range scope, developed in 1966 specifically for use as the standard Marine sniper rifle. Updated models of the M40 were used into the 21st century, but Mawhinney’s was the original version with a walnut stock—the only part of the rifle that gave him any trouble. “It was wet most of the time over there, and every couple months we had to take the stock off and do some sanding to keep the barrel free-floated. We hand-painted the stocks camo, but due to the linseed oil finish the paint eventually flaked away.” “

“The author fired 100 handgun loads into ballistic gelatin, measuring velocity, penetration and expansion for each.”

 “The term handgun “stopping power” generally relates various opinions about the ability of handguns to create ballistic wounds sufficient to incapacitate a target. Using muzzle velocity, caliber, bullet weight and energy, there have been multiple attempts to create formulas to rate handgun stopping power. The problem is that these theories are tied to mortality; the notions are based on the handgun’s ability to kill. From a hunting standpoint, that makes sense, but when looking at the role of a defensive handgun, it’s at least partially of no consequence.

The goal of the hunter is to kill as humanely as possible. The goal of an armed citizen using a defensive handgun is to stop an attacker as fast as possible. As similar as killing and stopping may sound, they are two very different things. It’s true that if you kill something you have stopped it, but unlike a hunter who can shoot an animal and let it run off a short distance to expire, a defensive handgun user needs to stop an attack immediately.”