Tag Archive: Asteroid


This Mysterious, Jaw-Dropping “Celestial Event” Is Like Nothing You’ve Ever Seen

 

 

” A sudden flash of light on a dark roadway over the Sverdlovsk region in Russia on November 14 at about 5:40 pm was captured on a motorist’s dash-camera.  The mysterious red and yellow glow suddenly appeared in the sky for about 14 seconds and then faded away.  There is no confirmation of the source of this celestial event. 

  Some local residents have suggested that it was a meteor similar to the one that fell in the Chelyabinsk region in February 2013, which exploded about 18 miles above the earth’s surface, causing damage to thousands of buildings and injury to 1,500 people from broken windows.  No damage or injuries have been reported. “

Western Journalism

Asteroid Near-Miss Reported By Russian Scientists

Asteroid detected by Sternberg Astronomical Institute © Photo Moscow State University/MASTER/Vladimir Lipunov

” A 15-meter (approximately 50 feet) asteroid, similar to the one that exploded above Russia in February, was detected hours before it narrowly missed the Earth over the weekend, Russian scientists said. Vladimir Lipunov of the Moscow State University and the Sternberg Astronomical Institute said on Sunday a network of telescopes operated by his team recorded a celestial body approaching the planet.
 
“[The asteroid] was discovered on Friday night by our station near Lake Baikal and nine hours later it flew within 11,300 kilometers of the Earth surface, below the orbit of geostationary satellites. It was about 15 meters in size,” he said.”

Big Asteroid Flyby

 

 

 

 

” May 30, 2013:

Asteroids have been a hot topic since February 15th  when one small asteroid exploded over Russia and another larger one, 2012 DA14, made a record setting close approach to Earth on the same day. This time the interloper is 1998 QE2, a potentially hazardous asteroid 2.7 km in diameter.  Astronomers are preparing to study the space rock as it harmlessly passes by on May 31st.

“This is a big asteroid that’s going to be one of the best radar imaging targets of the year,” says Lance Benner of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who Has the Right To Mine An Asteroid?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” As PopMech has relentlessly covered, the race is on to tap the mineral wealth tucked away in the asteroids. But are these big space rocks free for the taking, or will asteroid miners find themselves bogged down in outer space red tape? Instapundit blogger and resident contrarian Glenn Harlan Reynolds investigates.

Suddenly, the idea of asteroid mining is everywhere. As a recent feature here in Popular Mechanics noted, asteroid mining has gone from a “someday” idea to a business plan for more than one company. As a professor who’s been writing, teaching, and practicing space law since the 1980s, I say, why not? Asteroids are valuable, they’re out there, and they are free for the taking.

Or are they?

Asteroids are certainly available, and they’re valuable. More than 750,000 asteroids measure at least 1 kilometer across, and millions of smaller objects are scattered throughout the solar system, mostly in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Even a comparatively small asteroid is potentially quite valuable, both on Earth and in space.

A 79-foot-wide M-type (metallic) asteroid could hold 33,000 tons of extractable metals, including $50 million in platinum alone. A 23-foot-diameter C-type (carbonaceous) asteroid can hold 24,000 gallons of water, useful for generating fuel and oxygen. Even 1 gallon of water, at 8.33 pounds per, can cost tens of thousands of dollars to launch into Earth orbit. Prices will probably come down now that SpaceX and other private launch companies are in the game. But the numbers would need to improve a lot for water launched from Earth to compete with water that’s already floating in space. “

 

 

 

 

Earth Gets A Rush Of Weekend Asteroid Visitors

 

Asteroids

 

 

 

 ” An asteroid as big as a city block shot relatively close by the Earth on Saturday, the latest in a series of visiting celestial objects including an asteroid the size of a bus that exploded over Russia last month, injuring 1,500.

Discovered just six days ago, the 460-foot long (140-meter) Asteroid 2013 ET passed about 600,000 miles from Earth at 3:30 p.m. EST. That’s about 2-1/2 times as far as the moon, fairly close on a cosmic yardstick.

The scary part of this one is that it’s something we didn’t even know about,” Patrick Paolucci, president of Slooh Space Camera, said during a webcast featuring live images of the asteroid from a telescope in the Canary Islands.

Moving at a speed of about 26,000 miles per hour, the asteroid could have wiped out a large city if it had impacted the Earth, added Slooh telescope engineer Paul Cox.”

 

 

 

Space Agency Officials Plan To Slam A Spaceship Into An Asteroid

 

 

” It was announced in a joint effort U.S. and European Space Agencies are planning to slam a spaceship into the asteroid Didymos

The mission is called the joint European/U.S. Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment mission, or AIDA. Space officials announced Friday that they will plan to intercept the space rock in 2022.

The project will help scientists learn about the possibility of deflecting an asteroid from a possible collision course with Earth. Scientists will send a small probe into the asteroid which is 2,625-foot-wide and is part of a binary system. The asteroid and a smaller asteroid are in constant orbit each other. The probe will travel at 14,000 miles per hour and impact the asteroid while another spacecraft films the experiment.”

Estimates Raised For Nuclear-Sized Asteroid Blast That Hit Russia

 

 

 

 

” Scientists have raised their estimates of the size and power of what turns out to be the most widely witnessed asteroid strike in modern history. The size estimate puts the object that caused Friday’s meteor blast over Russia in a troublesome category of asteroids: big enough to cause damage, but small enough to evade detection.

The new estimates, based on additional readings from a sensor network built to detect nuclear blasts, suggest the meteor released the energy equivalent of nearly 500 kilotons of TNT. That’s about 30 times the power of the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

“These new estimates were generated using new data that had been collected by five additional infrasound stations located around the world — the first recording of the event being in Alaska, over 6,500 kilometers away from Chelyabinsk,” NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory said in a statement.”