Tag Archive: BB King


BB King & Joe Cocker – I’m In A Dangerous Mood

 

 

 

Uploaded on Jan 10, 2011

” Nice performance by BB King and Joe Cocker.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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John Mayer – BB King – Blues Guitar

 

 

 

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Happy Birthday To The King Of The Blues

 

 

Introduction

” Riley B. King (born September 16, 1925), known by the stage name B.B. King, is an American blues musician, singer, songwriter, and guitarist.

  Rolling Stone magazine ranked him at No. 6 on its 2011 list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time (previously ranked No. 3 in the 2003 edition of the same list), and he was ranked No. 17 in Gibson’s “Top 50 Guitarists of All Time”.According to Edward M. Komara, King “introduced a sophisticated style of soloing based on fluid string bending and shimmering vibrato that would influence virtually every electric blues guitarist that followed.”King was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987. He is considered one of the most influential blues musicians of all time, earning the nickname “The King of Blues”, and one of the “Three Kings of the Blues Guitar” (along with Albert King and Freddie King). King is also known for performing tirelessly throughout his musical career, appearing at 250-300 concerts per year until his seventies. In 1956 it was noted that he appeared at 342 shows. King continues to appear at 100 shows a year.

  Over the years, King has developed one of the world’s most identifiable guitar styles. He borrowed from Blind Lemon Jefferson, T-Bone Walker and others, integrating his precise and complex vocal-like string bends and his left hand vibrato, both of which have become indispensable components of rock guitarists’ vocabulary. His economy and phrasing has been a model for thousands of players. King has mixed blues, jazz, swing, mainstream pop and jump into a unique sound. In King’s words, “When I sing, I play in my mind; the minute I stop singing orally, I start to sing by playing Lucille.”

 

 

 

Early Career

” A singer and guitarist born into a sharecropping family on September 16, 1925, in Itta Bena, Mississippi, B.B. King—born Riley B. King—became one of the best-known blues performers, an important consolidator of blues styles, and a primary model for rock guitarists. Following his service in the U.S. Army, he began his career as a disc jockey in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was dubbed “the Beale Street Blues Boy.” That nickname was soon shortened to “B.B.”

  King made his first recording in 1949, and the next year began a 12-year-long association with Kent/RPM/Modern, for which he recorded a string of rhythm and blues hits, including “You Know I Love You,” “Woke Up This Morning” and “Three O’Clock Blues,” his first national hit. He also toured the nightclub circuit continuously, averaging more than 300 shows annually for over 30 years. His style of music earned him the title “King of the Blues.”

  Coincidentally, the year that King made his first recording was also the same year that he named his beloved guitar. King attended a dance in Twist, Arkansas, that had a barrel lit with kerosene in the middle of the dance floor, used to keep the crowd warm late at night. While there, a fight broke out and the barrel was knocked over, causing a fire to spread throughout the venue. Everyone evacuated, including King, but he rushed back inside to retrieve his prized guitar. Luckily, he managed to escape with his guitar as the building collapsed around him. King later learned that the fight erupted because of a woman who worked at the venue named Lucille. From then on, King named his guitar “Lucille” to remind himself never to do anything so foolish again.”

 

 

 

Beale Street Blues Boy

” After serving briefly in the army, King moved in with his cousin Booker (Bukka) White, also a blues guitarist. King’s attempts to copy Bukka’s playing helped him develop his own style. He sought out Sonny Boy Williamson, who had a radio show on WDIA in West Memphis, and asked to play a song for him. Williamson was so impressed with King that he offered King his own radio show and a chance to play regularly at Miss Annie’s 16th Street Grill. King was able to advertise his upcoming concerts on the radio, and soon he and his trio had become popular. Known on the radio as the “Beale Street Blues Boy,” which was shortened to “Bee-Bee,” and then to his famous initials, King decided he wanted to make records.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” King was signed to Bullet Records and in 1949 recorded four songs at the radio station, including “Miss Martha King” and “I’ve Got the Blues.” He also continued to perform in the area. Musician and talent scout Ike Turner (1931–) connected King with the Kent/Modern/RPM record label, and King’s King’s 1951 single for his new label, “Three O’Clock Blues,” became a hit. He scored several other hits during these years, and by the mid-1950s he was playing about three hundred shows a year. He would maintain this schedule for over twenty years.”

 

 

 

  

The Fifties & Sixties

” The 1950s saw King establish himself as a perennially formidable hitmaking force in the R&B field. Recording mostly in L.A. (the WDIA air shift became impossible to maintain by 1953 due to King‘s endless touring) for RPM and its successor Kent, King scored 20 chart items during that musically tumultuous decade, including such memorable efforts as “You Know I Love You” (1952); “Woke Up This Morning” and “Please Love Me” (1953); “When My Heart Beats like a Hammer,” “Whole Lotta’ Love,” and “You Upset Me Baby” (1954); “Every Day I Have the Blues” (another Fulson remake), the dreamy blues ballad “Sneakin’ Around,” and “Ten Long Years” (1955); “Bad Luck,” “Sweet Little Angel,” and a Platters-like “On My Word of Honor” (1956); and “Please Accept My Love” (first cut by Jimmy Wilson) in 1958. King‘s guitar attack grew more aggressive and pointed as the decade progressed, influencing a legion of up-and-coming axemen across the nation.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” In 1960, King‘s impassioned two-sided revival of Joe Turners “Sweet Sixteen” became another mammoth seller, and his “Got a Right to Love My Baby” and “Partin’ Time” weren’t far behind. But Kent couldn’t hang onto a star like King forever (and he may have been tired of watching his new LPs consigned directly into the 99-cent bins on the Biharis‘ cheapo Crown logo). King moved over to ABC-Paramount Records in 1962, following the lead of Lloyd Price, Ray Charles, and before long, Fats Domino.

  In November of 1964, the guitarist cut his seminal Live at the Regal album at the fabled Chicago theater and excitement virtually leaped out of the grooves. That same year, he enjoyed a minor hit with “How Blue Can You Get,” one of his many signature tunes. “Don’t Answer the Door” in 1966 and “Paying the Cost to Be the Boss” two years later were Top Ten R&B entries, and the socially charged and funk-tinged “Why I Sing the Blues” just missed achieving the same status in 1969. “

 

 

 

 

The Later Years

” Although B.B. King was a huge star in the African-American music community by 1965 he was still mostly unknown in the White community. This would change in 1965 when Elektra Records released Paul Butterfield’s first Butterfield Blues Band album, featuring the late Mike Bloomfield on guitar. Bloomfield became a star, almost overnight, and when he was asked where he learned to play the way he did, he replied, “By copying B.B.’s licks.” No one knew who “B.B.” was. And when they asked, “B.B.” who? Bloomfield replied, “The real monster; B.B. King.” After this happened B.B. King’s popularity soared. In short order “The Thrill Is Gone” became a big hit, he stopped having to play the “chitlin circuit” small town black clubs and started playing larger jazz clubs, dining rooms of luxury resort hotels, college concerts and rock palaces such as Filmore East .”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” In 1969 B.B. made his first appearance on network television on Johnny Carson’s the “Tonight Show.” In 1971 B.B. sang and played on Ed Sullivan’s show. By this time Sidney A. Seidenberg had come on board as B.B.’s new manager, he helped re-negotiate his old recording contracts with ABC/MCA records and got him major new bookings.

  Since the 1970’s B.B. King’s career has moved at a rapid pace up hill. He has recorded over 75 records, has received seven Grammy Awards, including its Lifetime Achievement Award in 1987, has been inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame, 1984, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, 1987, become a Member of the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame, 1990, received the Presidential Medal of the Arts, 1990, the Orville H. Gibson Lifetime Achievement Award, 1991, the Kennedy Center Honors, 1995, Presidential Medal of Freedom, American Heritage Fellowship Award by the National Endowment of the Arts, Three NAACP Image Awards, an MTV Video Music Award, 1989/89, a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and many, many more.

  He has won 22 Downbeat Music Magazine Readers and Critics Poll Awards, 5 Guitar Player Magazine Awards, he has received an Honorary Doctorate of Music from Yale University and fathered 15 children. He has toured with U2 as the super rock group’s opening act and had a song, “When Love Comes to Town, written for him by U2’s star, lead singer, Bono. B.B. King still works between 250 and 300 days a year, calling himself a “music workaholic.” He lives ( when he takes time to rest ) in Las Vegas, Nevada. and currently plays a Gibson ES-355, a guitar he has been playing for over 25 years. He has played all over the world including Africa, Europe, China, Japan, Australia and New Zealand and is properly referred to everywhere as “The Ambassador of the Blues,” a title he so richly deserves.”

 

 

 

” B.B. King has influenced the guitar playing of; Eric Clapton, the late Mike Bloomfield, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Albert Collins, Albert King and Jimi Hendrix. He is one of this country’s living, national treasures, a humble but proud, spiritual and beautiful human being, and still “King of the Blues.” “

 

 

 

 

Discography

Year Album Label AllMusic Rating User Ratings
Singin’ the Blues
1956 Singin’ the Blues album review Pure Pleasure Records
(15)
The Blues
1960 The Blues album review Ace
(42)
Sings Spirituals
1960 Sings Spirituals album review Diablo (UK)
(7)
B.B. King Wails
1960 B.B. King Wails album review
(17)
My Kind of Blues
1961 My Kind of Blues album review EMI-Capitol Special Markets
(7)
More
1961 More album review P-Vine Records
(0)
Easy Listening Blues
1962 Easy Listening Blues album review Pony Canyon Records
(5)
Twist with B.B. King 1962 Twist with B.B. King
(0)
Blues in My Heart
1962 Blues in My Heart album review Ace
(2)
Blues for Me 1962 Blues for Me
(2)
A Heart Full of Blues
1962 A Heart Full of Blues P-Vine Records
(2)
Swing Low 1963 Swing Low United Recordings
(0)
Mr. Blues [ABC]
1963 Mr. Blues [ABC] album review ABC Music
(5)
Rock Me Baby [Kent] 1964 Rock Me Baby [Kent]
(1)
Let Me Love You 1965 Let Me Love You album review P-Vine Records
(0)
Boss of the Blues
1965 Boss of the Blues P-Vine Records
(2)
Live at the Regal
1965 Live at the Regal album review MCA
(236)
Live! B. B. King on Stage 1965 Live! B. B. King on Stage
(0)
Confessin' the Blues 1965 Confessin’ the Blues album review ABC Music
(5)
Turn on to B.B. King 1966 Turn on to B.B. King album review
(0)
The Original Sweet Sixteen 1966 The Original Sweet Sixteen album review
(1)
9 X 9.5 1966 9 X 9.5 United Recordings
(0)
R&B Soul 1967 R&B Soul Ember
(0)
Blues Is King [MCA]
1967 Blues Is King [MCA] album review MCA / Universal Special Products
(13)
Lucille
1968 Lucille album review MCA
(16)
Blues on Top of Blues
1968 Blues on Top of Blues album review Beat Goes On
(13)
Live & Well
1969 Live & Well album review Beat Goes On
(16)
The Feeling They Call the Blues, Vol. 2 1969 The Feeling They Call the Blues, Vol. 2 Trio
(0)
The Feeling They Call the Blues 1969 The Feeling They Call the Blues Trio
(0)
Completely Well
1969 Completely Well album review MCA
(41)
The Incredible Soul of B.B. King 1970 The Incredible Soul of B.B. King album review
(0)
Indianola Mississippi Seeds
1970 Indianola Mississippi Seeds album review MCA
(40)
Live in Cook County Jail
1971 Live in Cook County Jailalbum review MCA
(101)
Live in Japan
1971 Live in Japan album review MCA
(17)
In London
1971 In London album review Beat Goes On
(18)
L.A. Midnight 1972 L.A. Midnight album review
(6)
Guess Who
1972 Guess Who album review MCA
(9)
To Know You Is to Love You
1973 To Know You Is to Love You album review MCA
(10)
Friends
1974 Friends Beat Goes On
(2)
Together for the First Time...Live
1974 Together for the First Time…Live album review MCA
(15)
Together for the First Time 1974 Together for the First Time album review Dunhill Compact Classics
(1)
Together Again...Live
1976 Together Again…Live album review MCA
(6)
King Size 1977 King Size album review ABC Music
(2)
Midnight Believer
1978 Midnight Believer album review MCA
(7)
Take It Home
1979 Take It Home album review MCA
(8)
Rarest B.B. King 1980 Rarest B.B. King Blues Boy
(1)
Live
1980 Live “Now Appearing” at Ole Miss album review MCA
(3)
There Must Be a Better World Somewhere
1981 There Must Be a Better World Somewhere album review Beat Goes On
(7)
Love Me Tender
1982 Love Me Tender album review MCA
(4)
Blues 'n' Jazz
1983 Blues ‘n’ Jazz album review MCA
(6)
Six Silver Strings
1985 Six Silver Strings album review MCA
(8)
One Nighter Blues 1987 One Nighter Blues Ace
(1)
Introducing B.B. King 1987 Introducing B.B. King MCA
(0)
Doing My Thing, Lord 1988 Doing My Thing, Lord Kent
(0)
Across the Tracks 1988 Across the Tracks Ace
(0)
Lucille Had a Baby 1989 Lucille Had a Baby Ace
(0)
Live at the Apollo
1990 Live at the Apollo album review GRP
(10)
I Like to Live the Love
1990 I Like to Live the Love album review MCA Special Products
(0)
Live at San Quentin
1991 Live at San Quentin album review MCA
(8)
There Is Always One More Time
1992 There Is Always One More Time album review MCA
(7)
Better Than Ever 1993 Better Than Ever Kent
(0)
Blues Summit
1993 Blues Summit album review MCA
(18)
B.B. King/Mayfield/Flack 1994 B.B. King/Mayfield/Flack Castle Music Ltd.
(0)
Live in Kansas City
1994 Live in Kansas City Charly Records
(7)
True Blue
1994 True Blue Sequel
(2)
Swing Low Sweet Chariot
1995 Swing Low Sweet Chariot Prime Cuts
(2)
On the Road with B.B King 1996 On the Road with B.B King MCA
(0)
The Masters of the Blues [Delta]
1997 The Masters of the Blues [Delta] album review Delta Distribution
(0)
Paying the Cost to Be the Boss
1997 Paying the Cost to Be the Boss album review Laserlight
(1)
Deuces Wild
1997 Deuces Wild album review MCA
(34)
King Biscuit Flower Hour Presents B.B. King
1998 King Biscuit Flower Hour Presents B.B. King album review King Biscuit Entertainment
(2)
Blues on the Bayou
1998 Blues on the Bayou album review MCA
(36)
Let the Good Times Roll: The Music of Louis Jordan
1999 Let the Good Times Roll: The Music of Louis Jordan album review MCA
(22)
Makin' Love Is Good for You
2000 Makin’ Love Is Good for You album review MCA
(10)
Riding with the King
2000 Riding with the King album review Reprise
(213)
A Night in Cannes
2001 A Night in Cannes Purple Pyramid/Cleopatra / Cleopatra
(2)
A Christmas Celebration of Hope
2001 A Christmas Celebration of Hope album review MCA
(5)
Reflections
2003 Reflections album review MCA
(6)
80
2005 80 album review Geffen
(20)
Live
2008 Live album review Geffen
(45)
One Kind Favor
2008 One Kind Favor album review Geffen
(202)
Live at the Royal Albert Hall 2011
2012 Live at the Royal Albert Hall 2011 album review Shout! Factory
(134)

Concert Films 

BB King Africa 1974

B.B. King – Live in Dallas (1983)

B.B. King & Friends – A Blues Session [live in L.A. 1987]

B.B.King Live in Bonn 1994

A Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan with Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy and BB King – 1996

B B King & Band Live at B B King Blues Clubs Nashville & Menphis 2006

 

 

 

Interviews

B.B. King 1968 Interview

A talk with B.B. King

BB King – Blues Master

B.B. King: First Gig

Interview with B.B. King – North Sea jazz 2000

B.B. King interview 1989 – U2 “discover” B.B. King!

BB King – Johnny Winter – Blues, Interviews & Jam

B.B. King: The Life of Riley Official Trailer 1 (2014) – Documentary HD

B B King – The Life of Riley – Interview

 

 

 

Happy Birthday To The King Of The Blues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In The Spotlight 1995

 

 

 

Daily Video 12.5.13

BB King Live Full Concert

 

 

Published on Apr 29, 2012

” The King of Blues is back! The legendary blues guitarist B.B. King lights up the stage with his trusty, lifelong companion Lucille and his remarkable touring band in the new concert, LIVE! Recorded in Tennessee at his two famous eponymous blues clubs, it features many of B.B.’s classic hits like “The Thrill Is Gone” and “When Love Comes To Town,” along with several songs never before recorded by blues great, including “You Are My Sunshine” and “When The Saints Go Marching In.” Experience the blues like never before from this musical icon.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BLUES GREAT BOBBY BLUE BLAND DEAD AT 83

 

 

 

 

” Bobby “Blue” Bland died on Sunday at the age of 83.

According to a family friend, Blues Hall of Fame recipient Robert Calvin “Bobby” Bland has died today. No other details were available.

Already the condolences are coming in.

Jim Hanzalik with World One Presents said, “”It’s with a heavy heart that we say goodbye to true legend and icon of the blues. Thank you for all the great memories, conversations and love you shared with us and your many fans. We love you and you’ll be missed – RIP Bobby Blue Bland.”

Jay Sieleman with the Blues Foundation called Bland the greatest blues singer in the world.”

 

 

 

 

More here …

” Born in Rosemark, Tennessee, Bobby Blue Bland, real name Robert Calvin “Bobby” Bland, is well known for blues hits such as “Turn On Your Love Light,” and R&B hits such as “That’s the Way Love Is,” but also in the hip hop community such as for his R&B hit “Ain’t No Love In The Heart Of The City,” which was sampled by Kanye West on Jay-Z’s Hip Hop album The Blueprint.

In 1981, Bland was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame, then the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992, followed by the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997.”

 

 

 

 

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame …

 

” Robert Calvin Bland aka Bobby “Blue” Bland (vocals; born January 27, 1930)

Bobby “Blue” Bland was born Robert Calvin Bland on January 27, 1930, in Rosemark, Tennessee, a small town near Memphis. When he was 17, he and his mother moved to Memphis. He worked at a garage during the week and sang spirituals on weekends. At various times, he served as a chauffeur for B.B. King and Roscoe Gordon and a valet for Junior Parker. He soon began hanging out on Beale Street, and he eventually became part of a loose-knit group called the Beale Streeters, which included Billy Duncan, Johnny Ace, B.B. King, Roscoe Gordon, Earl Forrest and Junior Parker.

After making some recordings for Duke Records, Bland was drafted into the Army in 1953. He returned to Memphis in 1955, only to find that everything had changed. Rock and roll was breaking down the old barriers between “race” and “pop,” and Duke Records had been sold to Don Robey. Bland spent the latter half of the Fifties maturing into a masterful singer and assured entertainer. His hallmark was his supple, confidential soul-blues delivery. As a singer, Bland projected a grainy, down-to-earth quality, punctuated with guttural growls and snorts that would come to be known as the “chicken-bone sound.” Yet his voice was simultaneously smooth as velvet, allowing Bland to bring audiences under his hypnotic spell as he walked a fine line between passionate expression and exquisite self-control.” 

 

 

 

 

Bobby Blue Bland

 

” Bobby’s first Duke single, “It’s My Life, Baby,” was released in 1955. Two years later, he scored with the seminal Texas shuffle “Farther Up The Road” (115 k, 10 sec.), which went to number 1 on the R&B charts. Follow-up records included two 1961 hits, “I Pity the Fool,” which also made it to number 1 on the R&B charts, and “Turn on Your Love Light,” which went to number 2. “That’s the Way Love Is,” a 1963 release, gave Bland his third number 1 hit. 

From 1957 to 1961 Bland played the chitlin’ circuit with Junior Parker and his band, the Blue Flames. But in 1961 Bland broke with Parker, went out on his own, and rose to his greatest popularity. Because Bland neither composed nor played an instrument, he relied on others for songs and inspired instrumentation. Joe Scott, his bandleader and arranger, and for years one of Duke label owner Don Robey’s chief talent scouts, helped create Bland’s big-band sound. Just as important to Bland’s sound was guitarist Wayne Bennett, who complemented the horns and Bland’s vocals with jazz-influenced solos,a la T-Bone Walker and B.B. King.”

 

 

 

Rest In Peace Bobby “Blue” Bland

 

BB King – Johnny Winter – Blues, Interviews & Jam – 8 min

Crossroads Festival MSG- Clapton, Cray, BB King, Jimmie Vaughan -Everyday I Have The Blues- 4/12/13

BB King Blues Store

Official Tour Poster Available Now

 

BB King – The Life Of Riley

A Documentary on the undisputed ” King of the Blues “

 

 

  ” Narrated by Morgan Freeman. Joined by Bono, Eric Clapton, Bruce Wilis, Ringo Star and others, including appearances by Keith Richards, Mick Jagger and President Obama, the legendary BB King opens his heart to Director Jon Brewer and tells the story of how an oppressed and somewhat orphaned youth came to influence and earn the unmitigated praise of the music industry to carry the title, ‘ King of the Blues’. 

Made with the full cooperation and contribution of BB King and the BB King Museum, BB King ‘ The Life of Riley’ brings to life the heat- and- gin soaked plantations where it all began.”

Rest In Peace SRV

Twenty Three years ago today we lost a GIANT

 

 Stevie Ray Vaughan, blues guitarist, dies in a helicopter crash at 35

 

Allmusic:

  “With his astonishingly accomplished guitar playing, Stevie Ray Vaughan ignited the blues revival of the ’80s. Vaughan drew equally from bluesmen like Albert KingOtis Rush, and Muddy Waters and rock & roll players like Jimi Hendrix and Lonnie Mack, as well as the stray jazz guitarist like Kenny Burrell, developing a uniquely eclectic and fiery style that sounded like no other guitarist, regardless of genre.Vaughan bridged the gap between blues and rock like no other artist had since the late ’60s. For the next seven years, Stevie Ray was the leading light in American blues, consistently selling out concerts while his albums regularly went gold. His tragic death in 1990 only emphasized his influence in blues and American rock & roll.”

 

Pride And Joy

Texas Flood 

COULDN’T STAND THE WEATHER

Crossfire

Sweet Home Chicago with Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Buddy Guy, Jimmie Vaughan, Robert Cray

Why I Sing the Blues with BB King , Eric Clapton , Albert King , Etta James , Dr John , Paul Butterfield, Phil Collins, Chaka Khan, Gladys Knight, Billy Ocean

A Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan

Albert King & Stevie Ray Vaughan — In Session 1983

Live at the El Mocambo 1983

Honolulu 1984

 

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After a day of ugliness spent wading through the cesspit of politics it is necessary to cleanse one’s soul with some beauty . This fits the bill nicely