Tag Archive: Belgian Malinois


The 30 Most Intelligent Doggies

 

Brittany

Our personal favorite , the Brittany

 

 

” We feel a little guilty labeling one dog smarter than another, but Stanley Coren, a professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia Vancouver, published a book in 1994 titled The Intelligence of Dogs. In this book he highlights his research, explaining how he determined which dogs were smarter than others. He determined that dogs have three types of intelligence: instinctive intelligence, adaptive intelligence, and working and obedience intelligence.

  Instinctive intelligence is a measurement of how well the breed performs the task it was bred for. Is it a herding dog? Well, how good of a job does it do herding livestock?”

 

 

Pembroke Welsh Corgi

 Our other favorite , the Pembroke Welch Corgi

 

 

” Adaptive intelligence is all about independent problem solving. Without any training, how quickly and thoroughly will the dog adapt to its environment and solve problems?

  Working and obedience intelligence deals with what the dog can learn from humans. This has to do with trainability. So, a dog may have instinctive and adaptive intelligence in excess, but be a pain in the rear to train. Or, the breed may take to training like nobody’s business, but be further down the list than others who are more stubborn.

  So, without further delay, check out the 30 most intelligence dogs! “

 

 

See all thirty breeds at Wably.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Geographic’s Profile Of The Dogs Of War

 

Picture of Marine Corporal John Dolezal posing with Cchaz, a Belgian Malinois

 

 

 

” Not all military dogs are suited to combat. Some wither in the heat or become too excited by the sounds of gunfire or explosions, even after they’ve been desensitized to them in training. Some are too loyal, too lazy, or too playful. Each dog is its own particular, sometimes peculiar, universe. Still, certain breeds generally do better than others on the battlefield, such as German shepherds, Labrador retrievers, and especially the Belgian Malinois, which is known for being fearless, driven, and able to handle the heat.

  But what works in a given environment may not work in another. History suggests that each battle situation calls for its own breed and tactics. Benjamin Franklin encouraged the use of dogs against the Indians. They “will confound the enemy a good deal,” he wrote, “and be very serviceable. This was the Spanish method of guarding their marches.” (Spanish conquistadores were said to have used bullmastiffs against Native Americans.)”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” During the Second Seminole War, starting in 1835, the U.S. military used Cuban-bred bloodhounds to track Indians in the swamps of Florida. Dogs were said to have guarded soldiers in the Civil War. During World War I both sides used tens of thousands of dogs as messengers. In World War II the U.S. Marines deployed dogs on Pacific islands to sniff out Japanese positions. In Vietnam an estimated 4,000 canines were used to lead jungle patrols, saving numerous lives. (Nevertheless, the military decided to leave many behind when the U.S. pulled out.)”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the whole story at National Geographic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smartest Dog Breeds

 

 

 

 

” How do you qualify a question that asks what the smartest dog breeds are?

Defining the smartest dog breeds depends on what defines a “smart dog.” Is it the ability to wrap people around her dewclaw and get her way, no matter what?

Which dog is smarter, the one that does as he’s told and works hard for his supper or the one that cocks her head, looks confused and is waited on because she’s obviously too challenged to find her way to her own food bowl?”

 

Here are some of the dumber breeds …

 

” Breeds often accused of being most likely to be held back a grade include:

Owners of these breeds might agree their dogs may not have college futures, but they do have street smarts, and when it comes to getting their way, they’re without peer.

The reason for these differences in the smartest dog breeds and “other breeds” is all in the genes.

Or more precisely, the tendency to follow human direction depends very much on what a breed was developed to do in the first place. Of the most trainable breeds, almost all come from herding or retrieving backgrounds, jobs for which the ability to follow human cues is vital.”

 

If you want to know the smartest breeds you’ll just have to follow the link … good doggie 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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