Tag Archive: Census Bureau


The 35.4 Percent: 109,631,000 On Welfare

 

 

 

 

 

” 109,631,000 Americans lived in households that received benefits from one or more federally funded “means-tested programs” — also known as welfare — as of the fourth quarter of 2012, according to data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau.

  The Census Bureau has not yet reported how many were on welfare in 2013 or the first two quarters of 2014.

  But the 109,631,000 living in households taking federal welfare benefits as of the end of 2012, according to the Census Bureau, equaled 35.4 percent of all 309,467,000 people living in the United States at that time.

  When those receiving benefits from non-means-tested federal programs — such as Social Security, Medicare, unemployment and veterans benefits — were added to those taking welfare benefits, it turned out that 153,323,000 people were getting federal benefits of some type at the end of 2012.

  Subtract the 3,297,000 who were receiving veterans’ benefits from the total, and that leaves 150,026,000 people receiving non-veterans’ benefits.

  The 153,323,000 total benefit-takers at the end of 2012, said the Census Bureau, equaled 49.5 percent of the population. The 150,026,000 taking benefits other than veterans’ benefits equaled about 48.5 percent of the population. “

 

CNS News has more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Census Bureau: One New Migrant Enters U.S. Every 40 Seconds

 

 

Populous Nations

 

 

 

” The Census Bureau calculates that one person enters the United States legally, on net, every 40 seconds.

  The Census Bureau’s U.S. and World Population Clock lists  “components of population change” on the website: “one birth every 7 seconds;” “one death every 13 seconds;” “one international migrant (net) every 40 seconds;” making for a “net gain of one person every 12 seconds.”

  The Census provides some background on the immigration debate in the United States on August 3rd, apropos of the 131st anniversary of the law banning people from immigrating to the United States if they were likely to need government assistance. ”

 

The Corner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

86M Full-Time Private-Sector Workers Sustain 148M Benefit Takers

 

 

Entitlement Nation

 

 

 

 

” Buried deep on the website of the U.S. Census Bureau is a number every American citizen, and especially those entrusted with public office, should know. It is 86,429,000.
 
  That is the number of Americans who in 2012 got up every morning and went to work — in the private sector — and did it week after week after week.

  These are the people who built America, and these are the people who can sustain it as a free country. The liberal media have not made them famous like the polar bear, but they are truly a threatened species.”

 

 

Have a look at the numbers …

 

 

” In 2012, according to the Census Bureau, approximately 103,087,000 people worked full-time, year-round in the United States. “A full-time, year-round worker is a person who worked 35 or more hours per week (full time) and 50 or more weeks during the previous calendar year (year round),” said the Census Bureau. “For school personnel, summer vacation is counted as weeks worked if they are scheduled to return to their job in the fall.”

  Of the 103,087,000 full-time, year-round workers, 16,606,000 worked for the government. That included 12,597,000 who worked for state and local government and 4,009,000 who worked for the federal government.

  In the last quarter of 2011, according to the Census Bureau, approximately 82,457,000 people lived in households where one or more people were on Medicaid. 49,073,000 lived in households were someone got food stamps. 23,228,000 lived in households where one or more got WIC. 20,223,000 lived in households where one or more got SSI. 13,433,000 lived in public or government-subsidized housing.”

 

   Anyone can do this math , the system is unsustainable … The question is , ” By accident or by design ? ”

Read the rest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. Homeownership Rate Falls to Lowest Since 1995

 

 

 

 

” The U.S. homeownership rate fell to the lowest in almost 18 years, reflecting rising demand for rentals and investor purchases in the housing market.

The share of Americans who own their homes was 65 percent in the first quarter, down from 65.4 percent a year earlier and the lowest level since the third quarter of 1995, the Census Bureau reported today. The vacancy rate for rented homes dropped to 8.6 percent from 8.8 percent a year earlier, while vacancies for owner-occupied houses fell to 2.1 percent from 2.2 percent.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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