Salisbury Cathedral Spire Climb December 2014

 

 

 

    Watch as Philip Scorer ascends the Salisbury Cathedral spire to perform needed repairs on the weather station …

 

 

 

    Here is another video of the men at the very top doing the repairs to the anemometer and enjoying the view from 400 feet up … not for the faint of heart …

 

 

   Here is yet one more view of the spectacular climb up the Cathedral’s spire , complete with some conversation with the men before they begin their ascent . 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published on Dec 18, 2014

” Man takes the ultimate selfie from the top of Wiltshire’s Salisbury cathedral while filming scheduled repair work.

  Is this Britain’s most terrifying selfie? Daredevil conservationist snaps a pic of himself at the top of Salisbury Cathedral’s 404ft spire

  A daredevil conservationist and his team have taken Britain’s most stomach-churning seflie – from the top of a 404ft medieval spire.

  Gary Price, 46, clerk of works at Salisbury Cathedral in Wiltshire, and a team of helpers took a number of pictures from the capstone at the very top of the spire while carrying out repairs.

  Kitted out in ropes, a harness and a hard hat Mr Price, who is in charge of the cathedral’s conservation, made the hair-raising climb to replace a faulty wind meter accompanied by rope access specialists.

  He climbed the 332 steps inside the cathedral to the base of the tower before scaling ten narrow ladders inside the spire to a small weather door.

  He then climbed through the door and pulled himself up the last 30 feet to the capstone using rungs set into the outside of the spire’s masonry.

  It is only the fourth time Mr Price, from Salisbury, has made the climb and something that will not be repeated for another three or four years.
He replaced the anemometer, a device for measuring wind speed, which had stopped working properly in wind and rain.

  Mr Price and his team also abseiled down the east side to check out and plug a leak that was discovered as a result of the September storms.

  While most cathedrals in medieval times took centuries to build, Salisbury’s was erected in just 38 years by 300 men from 1220 to 1258.

  The spire was added later between 1300 and 1330 and the cathedral is the tallest medieval structure in the world.

  Salisbury Cathedral also has Britain’s largest cloister and largest cathedral close, the world’s oldest working clock and the best surviving of the four original copies of the Magna Carta.

  Mr Price said: ‘It’s a very exciting day for me because I don’t get to go up the spire very often at all and it’s probably going to be the last time for another three or four years.

‘ The cathedral is the tallest medieval structure in the world, 404ft to get to the capstone.

‘ When you climb out the weather door the spire is quite wide, but the higher you go the more narrow it gets and you do feel a bit like “is this going to take my weight?” but it will, it’s been there for 800 years.

‘ It is quite exposed and you can see all the way around you.

‘ When you get up there your heart is definitely in your mouth and all of your senses are heightened.

‘ You’re super safe but it’s certainly an adrenaline rush.

‘ The hardest bit is making yourself climb out of the door when you’re perfectly safe inside and when you abseil back down to go in the door, with the harness and all the equipment you need and it’s a narrow door it can be quite tight to get back in.

‘ If there’s two or three of you up there and one of you moves you can feel the spire slightly swaying.’ “

Read more here , here and here