Tag Archive: Criminal justice


Dr. Gary Kleck on Gun Control

” Dr. Gary Kleck is widely recognized as one of the top criminologists and gun control experts in the entire country. As a professor of Criminology at the Florida State University College of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Dr. Kleck was kind enough to allow me, an FSU undergraduate student, to interview him on the effectiveness of self-defensive gun use.

(Go to http://www.amazon.com/Gary-Kleck/e/B0… to see an assortment of books written by Gary Kleck on gun control and crime.)

(Song: Meteor Shower by Owl City)”

The Criminology of Firearms

 

 

 

” In 2004, the National Academy of Sciences reviewed 253 journal articles, 99 books, 43 government publications and some empirical research of its own about guns. The Academy could not identify any gun restriction that had reduced violent crime, suicide or gun accidents.

Why don’t gun bans work? Because they rely on voluntary compliance by gun-using criminals. Prohibitionists never see this absurdity because they deceive themselves into thinking that, as Katherine Christoffel has said: “[M]ost shootings are not committed by felons or mentally ill people, but are acts of passion that are committed using a handgun that is owned for home protection.”

Christoffel, et al., are utterly wrong. The whole corpus of criminological research dating back to the 1890’s shows murderers “almost uniformly have a long history of involvement in criminal behavior,” and that “[v]irtually all” murderers and other gun criminals have prior felony records—generally long ones.

While only 15 percent of Americans have criminal records, roughly 90 percent of adult murderers have prior adult records—exclusive of their often extensive juvenile records—with crime careers of six or more adult years including four major felonies. Gerald D. Robin, writing for the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, notes that, unlike ordinary gun owners, “the average murderer turns out to be no less hardened a criminal than the average robber or burglar.” “

 

 

READ IT ALL , And SPREAD IT FAR AND WIDE 

 

 

 

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DoJ Admits Aaron’s Prosecution Was Political

 

 

 

 

” The DOJ has told Congressional investigators that Aaron’s prosecution was motivated by his political views on copyright.

I was going to start that last paragraph with “In a stunning turn of events,” but I realized that would be inaccurate — because it’s really not that surprising. Many people speculated throughout the whole ordeal that this was a political prosecution, motivated by anything/everything from Aaron’s effective campaigning against SOPA to his run-ins with the FBI over the PACER database. But Aaron actually didn’t believe it was — he thought it was overreach by some local prosecutors who didn’t really understand the internet and just saw him as a high-profile scalp they could claim, facilitated by a criminal justice system and computer crime laws specifically designed to give prosecutors, however incompetent or malicious, all the wrong incentives and all the power they could ever want.

But this HuffPo article, and what I’m hearing from sources on the Hill, suggest that that’s not true. That Ortiz and Heymann knew exactly what they were doing: Shutting up, and hopefully locking up, an extremely effective activist whose political views, including those on copyright, threatened the Powers That Be:”