Tag Archive: Democracy


Wonder Where They’ll Ever Find A Centralized World To Manage Choice And Behavior

 

 

 

 

” David Golumbia writing at Jacobin is steamed at the supposed “deletion of the left” by supposedly dominant “cyberlibertarians.”

  He starts off going wrong with a rather gross misunderstanding of what being “of the left” in American terms means these days:

 

  The digital revolution, we are told everywhere today, produces democracy. It gives “power to the people” and dethrones authoritarians; it levels the playing field for distribution of information critical to political engagement; it destabilizes hierarchies, decentralizes what had been centralized, democratizes what was the domain of elites.

  Most on the Left would endorse these ends. The widespread availability of tools whose uses are harmonious with leftist goals would, one might think, accompany broad advancement of those goals in some form. Yet the Left today is scattered, nearly toothless in most advanced democracies. If digital communication technology promotes leftist values, why has its spread coincided with such a stark decline in the Left’s political fortunes?

 

  What the left really wants is a centralized elite authority that pursues particular ends it claims to desire, often allegedly on behalf of “the people”; people who really want dethroned authority, free flow of information, and decentralization are libertarians.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Constitution: Birthed In Self-Determination

 

 

 

” The proper question in any political system is who are the sovereigns?

Is the President the Sovereign?  Is Congress the Sovereign?  Is a King the sovereign?  Are the people the Sovereigns?  Why so much confusion over the question of whether the Union is a democracy or a republic?

The answers to those questions seem to puzzle many commentators.  Though the Union is a constitutional republic, for arguments sake, let us assume the Union was a democracy.  It doesn’t alter the fundamental truth regarding sovereignty.  The people are the sovereigns and the people are the source of all power in our political system.  However, the system is not majority rule, nor it is a system of absolute power where might makes right.  Our entire political system rests on a single fundamental principle — the consent of the governed; the right to self-governance and self-determination.”

 

 

 

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Attention, Red State Knuckle Draggers: Surrender

 

 

 

” You have to give this execrable Bloomberg editorial from earlier today points for candor:

The struggle to enact [the Manchin-Toomey plan] turned uphill this week, with nearly all Senate Republicans opposing it and even a few red-state Democrats running for cover. The proposal’s demise, in a 54-46 vote, is a testament to legislators’ continuing fear of the gun lobby. It also illuminates a political equation that grows more unbalanced, especially in the Senate, every year. The votes of Wyoming’s two senators, representing 580,000 citizens, effectively cancel the votes of California’s two senators, representing 38 million. The votes of Illinois, with a population of almost 13 million, are voided by those of Alaska, with little more than 700,000.

This is a problem for sensible gun legislation. It is also a problem for American democracy. If the nation’s laws fail to represent the views of the overwhelming majority of its people, representative democracy becomes a shallow and unsustainable exercise.

Maybe it’s just the editor in me, but do we generally use the word “unsustainable” for something that’s been functioning for well over two centuries?

Now, it’s not quite as bad as it sounds. This turns out to be an argument for abolishing the filibuster, not doing away with the Senate as we know it (not that we need any further proof that the leftwouldn’t shed a single tear over the latter proposal). The reason? You damn rubes won’t put down the boomsticks:”

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s  Not About Conspiracy, It’s About Centralization

 

 

 

 

” “The conscious and intelligent manipulation of the organized habits and opinions of the [public] is an important element in democratic society. Those who manipulate this unseen mechanism of society constitute an invisible government which is the true ruling power of our country.”

–Edward Bernays

 

Bernays had a student, a very infamous student who perfected the work Bernays pioneered.  This student credited Bernays for his and his country’s successful implementation of these techniques in mass control:

It is the absolute right of the state to supervise the formation of public opinion.

 Not every item of news should be published. Rather must those who control news policies endeavor to make every item of news serve a certain purpose. ” 

The Federalist Papers

 

 

If They Come for Your Guns, Do You Have a Responsibility to Fight?

 

 

 

” Dean Garrison wrote an article in the D. C. Clothesline recently which gives a very good overview of the issues and the stake. I implore you to read this and consider very carefully where you will stand, like everything else, preparation and planning is important. Here’s Dean.

‘I feel a tremendous responsibility to write this article though I am a little apprehensive. Thinking about the possibility of rising up against our own government is a frightening thing for many of us. I am not Johnny Rambo and I will be the first to admit that I do not want to die. The reason I feel compelled to write this, however, is simply because I don’t think the average American is equipped with the facts. I feel that a lot of American citizens feel like they have no choice but to surrender their guns if the government comes for them. I blame traditional media sources for this mass brainwash and I carry the responsibility of all small independent bloggers to tell the truth. So my focus today is to lay out your constitutional rights as an American, and let you decide what to do with those rights.

About a month ago I let the “democracy” word slip in a discussion with a fellow blogger. I know better. Americans have been conditioned to use this term. It’s not an accurate term and it never has been a correct term to describe our form of government. The truth is that the United States of America is a constitutional republic. This is similar to a democracy because our representatives are selected by democratic elections, but ultimately our representatives are required to work within the framework of our constitution. In other words, even if 90% of Americans want something that goes against our founding principles, they have no right to call for a violation of constitutional rights.

If you are religious you might choose to think of it this way… Say that members of your congregation decide that mass fornication is a good thing. Do they have the right to change the teachings of your God? The truth is the truth. It doesn’t matter how many people try to stray from it…. ” 

Daily Quote 11/15

H L Mencken

 

 

 

 

 ” Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard. “

Charles Lane :

“Will there be apologies from those who toted posters depicting him as Hitler? Any second thoughts from, say, Conor Oberst, the leader of Bright Eyes, the indie rock band, who called Walker a “fucking Nazi,” and urged his audience to “every day egg his fucking house.”

I would like to ask Gerald McEntee, the leader of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees union, if it was a bit excessive to call Walker’s budget reforms “an attack on the freedoms of every Wisconsin citizen”?

Now that Walker has been freely and peacefully elected — again — does Harold Meyerson regret writing that Walker’s policies represented “a throwback to 19th-century America, when strikes were suppressed by force of arms. Or, come to think of it, to Mubarak’s Egypt or communist Poland and East Germany.” How about Katrina vanden Heuvel? She, too, pushed the Cairo analogy, asserting that the fight in Wisconsin was “about basic democratic rights and the balance of power in America.” “