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Tag Archive: Dilma Rousseff


Young People Inspired By Libertarianism, Conservative Free-Market Ideals Push For Change In Brazil

 

 

 

 

    Above is a video of the demonstration for those that understand Portuguese and much more may be found here and here .

 

 

” Microphone in hand and standing atop the sound truck, the raspy-voiced protest leader jabbed his finger into the air shouting for the ouster of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, igniting wild cheers from the crowd below him.

” What Lula and Dilma have done shouldn’t just result in their being banned from politics. It should result in them being in jail!” Kim Kataguiri yelled, denouncing Rousseff and her predecessor, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva.” 

 

 

 

 

” The March 15 demonstration was the largest Sao Paulo had seen in more than three decades, since 1984 protests demanding democratic elections after a long dictatorship.

  But more surprising than the crowd of more than 200,000, according to the Datafolha polling and statistics agency, was the fact it was being led by Kataguiri, a skinny, 19-year-old college dropout, and other young Brazilian activists inspired by libertarianism and conservative free-market ideals.

  The grandson of Japanese immigrants, Kataguiri is a social media star whose quirky videos skewer Rousseff and the ruling party’s social welfare policies. His ascent as a protest figure has been rapid. Two years ago, when protests erupted across Brazil over corruption and poor public services, Kataguiri was a high schooler who avoided the unrest.”

 

Deseret News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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An Open Letter To The People Of Brazil

 

 

 

” Six months ago, I stepped out from the shadows of the United States Government’s National Security Agency to stand in front of a journalist’s camera.

  I shared with the world evidence proving some governments are building a world-wide surveillance system to secretly track how we live, who we talk to, and what we say.

  I went in front of that camera with open eyes, knowing that the decision would cost me family and my home, and would risk my life. I was motivated by a belief that the citizens of the world deserve to understand the system in which they live.

  My greatest fear was that no one would listen to my warning. Never have I been so glad to have been so wrong. The reaction in certain countries has been particularly inspiring to me, and Brazil is certainly one of those.

  At the NSA, I witnessed with growing alarm the surveillance of whole populations without any suspicion of wrongdoing, and it threatens to become the greatest human rights challenge of our time.

  The NSA and other spying agencies tell us that for our own “safety” –for Dilma’s “safety,” for Petrobras’ “safety”– they have revoked our right to privacy and broken into our lives. And they did it without asking the public in any country, even their own.

  Today, if you carry a cell phone in Sao Paolo, the NSA can and does keep track of your location: they do this 5 billion times a day to people around the world.

  When someone in Florianopolis visits a website, the NSA keeps a record of when it happened and what you did there. If a mother in Porto Alegre calls her son to wish him luck on his university exam, NSA can keep that call log for five years or more.

  They even keep track of who is having an affair or looking at pornography, in case they need to damage their target’s reputation.

  American Senators tell us that Brazil should not worry, because this is not “surveillance,” it’s “data collection.” They say it is done to keep you safe. They’re wrong.

  There is a huge difference between legal programs, legitimate spying, legitimate law enforcement –where individuals are targeted based on a reasonable, individualized suspicion – and these programs of dragnet mass surveillance that put entire populations under an all-seeing eye and save copies forever.

  These programs were never about terrorism: they’re about economic spying, social control, and diplomatic manipulation. They’re about power.

  Many Brazilian senators agree, and have asked for my assistance with their investigations of suspected crimes against Brazilian citizens.

  I have expressed my willingness to assist wherever appropriate and lawful, but unfortunately the United States government has worked very hard to limit my ability to do so –going so far as to force down the Presidential Plane of Evo Morales to prevent me from traveling to Latin America!

  Until a country grants permanent political asylum, the US government will continue to interfere with my ability to speak.

  Six months ago, I revealed that the NSA wanted to listen to the whole world. Now, the whole world is listening back, and speaking out, too. And the NSA doesn’t like what it’s hearing.

   The culture of indiscriminate worldwide surveillance, exposed to public debates and real investigations on every continent, is collapsing.

  Only three weeks ago, Brazil led the United Nations Human Rights Committee to recognize for the first time in history that privacy does not stop where the digital network starts, and that the mass surveillance of innocents is a violation of human rights.

  The tide has turned, and we can finally see a future where we can enjoy security without sacrificing our privacy. Our rights cannot be limited by a secret organization, and American officials should never decide the freedoms of Brazilian citizens.

  Even the defenders of mass surveillance, those who may not be persuaded that our surveillance technologies have dangerously outpaced democratic controls, now agree that in democracies, surveillance of the public must be debated by the public.

  My act of conscience began with a statement: “I don’t want to live in a world where everything that I say, everything I do, everyone I talk to, every expression of creativity or love or friendship is recorded.

  That’s not something I’m willing to support, it’s not something I’m willing to build, and it’s not something I’m willing to live under.”

  Days later, I was told my government had made me stateless and wanted to imprison me. The price for my speech was my passport, but I would pay it again: I will not be the one to ignore criminality for the sake of political comfort. I would rather be without a state than without a voice.

  If Brazil hears only one thing from me, let it be this: when all of us band together against injustices and in defense of privacy and basic human rights, we can defend ourselves from even the most powerful systems.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brazil To Host Global Summit To Draw Up New Governance Model

 

 

 

 

” Here’s a hugely important story that brings together three major threads. First, the continuing wrangling over the form that Internet governance should take. Second, the fact that NSA’s massive surveillance operations around the world have included economic espionage. And third, Brazil’s increasingly angry reaction to that spying. As a post from the Internet Governance Project explains:

the Directors of all the major Internet organizations — ICANN, the Internet Engineering Task Force, the Internet Architecture Board, the World Wide Web Consortium, the Internet Society, all five of the regional Internet address registries — turned their back on the US government. With striking unanimity, the organizations that actually develop and administer Internet standards and resources initiated a break with 3 decades of U.S. dominance of Internet governance.

Those directors have issued what they call the “Montevideo Statement on the Future of Internet Cooperation,” which includes the following:

They called for accelerating the globalization of and functions, towards an environment in which all stakeholders, including all governments, participate on an equal footing.

That’s a fairly clear call for the US to relinquish its dominant role. Another section hints at why this is happening now:

They expressed strong concern over the undermining of the trust and confidence of Internet users globally due to recent revelations of pervasive monitoring and surveillance.”

The BRICS “Independent Internet” Cable. In Defiance Of The “US-Centric Internet”

 

 

” The President of Brazil, Dilma Rousseff announces publicly the creation of a world internet system INDEPENDENT from US and Britain ( the “US-centric internet”).

Not many understand that, while the immediate trigger for the decision (coupled with the cancellation of a summit with the US president) was the revelations on NSA spying, the reason why Rousseff can take such a historic step is that the alternative infrastructure: The BRICS cable from Vladivostock, Russia  to Shantou, China to Chennai, India  to Cape Town, South Africa  to Fortaleza, Brazil,  is being built and it’s, actually, in its final phase of implementation.

No amount of provocation and attempted “Springs” destabilizations and Color Revolution in the Middle East, Russia or Brazil can stop this process.  The huge submerged part of the BRICS plan is not yet known by the broader public.”

 

 

   When Obama promised “Hope & Change”  he didn’t say who would reap the benefits , did he ? Now we know he was really talking about the emerging markets of the world with the “west” reduced to riding in the back . No wonder the rest of the world was more enthusiastic about his presidency than were the American people .

 

 

netw_geo

 

 

” BRICS Cable… a 34 000 km, 2 fibre pair, 12.8 Tbit/s capacity, fibre optic cable system

      • For any global investor, there is no crisis – there is plenty of growth. It’s just not in the old world
      • BRICS is ~45% of the world’s population and ~25% of the world’s GDP
      • BRICS together create an economy the size of Italy every year… that’s the 8th largest economy in the world
      • The BRICS presents profound opportunities in global geopolitics and commerce
 
  • Links Russia, China, India, South Africa, Brazil – the BRICS economies – and the United States.

  • Interconnect with regional and other continental cable systems in Asia, Africa and South America for improved global coverage

  • Immediate access to 21 African countries and give those African countries access to the BRICS economies.

  • Projected ready for service date is mid to second half of 2015.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brazil To Obama: We’re Not Coming To Dinner

 

” Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff has scrapped a scheduled state visit to the White House amid Brazilian outrage over news that the U.S. spied on her and a Brazilian oil company.

The cancellation of the Oct. 23 visit is the first public diplomatic fallout prompted by the revelations of National Security Agency spying and represents a serious rift between the two economic powerhouses and trading partners.

Obama has sought repeatedly to allay Brazil’s concerns, meeting privately with Rousseff at an economic summit in St. Petersburg, and dispatching several top members of his administration to speak to the Brazilians. Obama spoke with Rousseff by phone Monday, and White House spokesman Jay Carney said they agreed to postpone the state visit – which would have been the first of Obama’s second term.

Carney said the two presidents believed the visit “should not be overshadowed by a single bilateral issue, no matter how important or challenging the issue may be.”

But the Brazilian government said Tuesday the issue has yet to be resolved to its satisfaction.

“The illegal practice of intercepting communications and data of citizens, businesses and members of the Brazilian government constitute(s) a serious act which threatens national sovereignty and individual rights, and which is incompatible with democratic coexistence between friendly countries,” it said in a statement.”

 

 

Good For Brazil … Good For US

 

 

” Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff has canceled a state visit to Washington in October over reports that the United States spied on her personal communications and those of other Brazilians, a leading Brazilian newspaper reported on Tuesday.

Rousseff, who was infuriated by the spying reports, decided to cancel despite a 20-minute telephone call from President Barack Obama on Monday night in a last-minute attempt to salvage the trip, O Globo newspaper said.

Rousseff is expected to announce whether or not she is going to Washington at a news conference later on Tuesday.

If she confirms she will not go, it would be a big blow to U.S.-Brazilian relations. Ties had been improving steadily since Rousseff took office in 2011 but were upset by reports that the National Security Agency snooped on emails, text messages and calls between the president and her aides.”