Tag Archive: Ellisville


Federal Judge Rules Drivers Allowed To Flash Headlights To Warn Of Speed Traps

 

 

 

 

” A federal judge in Missouri ruled this week held that drivers have a First Amendment right to flash their headlights to warn other motorists of nearby police and speed traps. 

  The order by U.S. District Judge Henry E. Autrey in St. Louis on Monday stems from a lawsuit filed by Ellisville resident Michael Elli. In 2012, Elli flashed his headlights to warn oncoming vehicles of a radar set up by police in the town of Ellisville.

  A flash of headlights is a common way motorists communicate to oncoming drivers of either a dangerous situation or the presence of police — in essence, a warning to slow down. 

  An officer saw the flash and pulled over Elli, who could have faced a fine of up to $1,000 if convicted. Elli, was accused of “[f]lashing lights on certain vehicles . . . warning of RADAR ahead,” according to court papers obtained by The Wall Street Journal.

  At a hearing on the lawsuit last year, Ellisville officials made the case that flashing headlights could interfere with a police investigation. But Autrey said in his ruling that the flashing of headlights “sends a message to bring one’s driving in conformity with the law — whether it be by slowing down, turning on one’s own headlamps at dusk or in the rain, or proceeding with caution.” “

 

 

 

 

 

 

St. Louis Suburb Beats Back Wal-Mart Land Grab, Saves Hundreds Of Peoples’ Homes From Eminent Domain Abuse

 

 

Ellisville Vs Walmart

 

 

” It sounds like a modern-day David versus Goliath story. Residents in Ellisville, Mo., a town of 9,000 people, went up against Wal-Mart, one of the largest corporations in the world.

  For years, city officials have been planning to lure Wal-Mart to Ellisville, about a half-hour away from St. Louis. Their most recent plan involved building a 150,000-square-foot Supercenter, which would have cost $50 million. A private developer could have received up to $15 million in tax incentives. Even more outrageously, Ellisville could have also authorized eminent domain to acquire property.

  To make way for Wal-Mart, an entire apartment complex, Clarkchester Apartments, would have been demolished. That’s 100 homes. If the plan had gone through, 250 residents would have been forced to relocate.

  But in October, after intense pressure from both grassroots activists and a new mayor, Wal-Mart announced it had “decided not to proceed” with the Ellisville store.

  The city council later followed suit to better protect some of its residents from eminent domain abuse. On December 18, the Ellisville City Council passed a resolution unanimously that curbs the power of eminent domain.”

 

 

Continued at InstituteForJustice.org