Tag Archive: Environment


Look At What Two Years On Mars Did To The Curiosity Rover

 

 

 

Mars Rover

 

 

” NASA’s Curiosity rover just recently finished its second year exploring Mars, and the red planet’s harsh environment has taken its toll. Rocky terrain, tricky sand dunes, and exposure to Martian dust storms have left the SUV-sized robot looking a little worse for wear as it continues its march towards its eventual goal, Mount Sharp.

  Below is a before-and-after look at a variety of instruments and features on Curiosity and the wear they’ve endured during the rover’s first two years, made from images uploaded by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Each image is either from the MAHLI imager or the Mastcam, and is also labeled with the Sol number (sol = one Martian solar day, the mission is currently on Sol 724) during which each image was taken.”

See more at The Verge

“The Science Is Over … Not”

 

 

” “The science is over”. Remember that line? There was a time when that angry and arrogant (not to say delusional) mantra about climate change was something you couldn’t get away from. It was complemented with the charge that anyone questioning the scientific “consensus” was a “denier” — a word more commonly used in the wider political discourse about those twisted individuals and groups that refuse to accept the historical reality of the Nazi Holocaust against the Jews.

If the charge of flat-headed anti-scientific stupidity coupled with neo-Nazi-type tendencies didn’t suffice to close down the debate, the sceptic must (it was, and continues to be, alleged) be in the pay of the oil and coal lobby. Honest disagreement, most particularly about the certainty of it all, was ruled out of court.

The IPCC is arguing that they are 95 percent certain that the planet is warming due to man-made activities. But, in scientific terms, 95 percent is no more a proof than 19.5 percent or 9.5 percent. It still means you can’t prove it.

Telling people that the “science is over” when it manifestly wasn’t, has only turned people off from doing that.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congress Cancels Global Warming Hearing Because of Snowstorm

 

 

 

” Moments like this are why ecoscammers no longer call it “Global Warming”, but rebranded it as “Climate Change.” Because a snowstorm is climate change too, even if it keeps you from holding hearings on the effect of climate change on climate change meetings.

The snowquester has claimed yet another casualty: Wednesday’s House hearing on global warming.

The House Science, Space and Technology Committee announced early Wednesday that it’s postponing its environmental subcommittee’s scheduled 10 a.m. hearing on the state of the science behind climate change. As a reason, it cited “weather.” “

 

 

Richard Epstein @ Ricochet

 

 

 

 

” Do property rights count for nothing anymore? This question lies at the heart of my column this week for Hoover’s Defining Ideas.

This month, the Supreme Court will hear a case, coming out of Florida, addressing the longstanding conflict between the constitutional protection of property rights and the state’s desire to preserve its pristine wetlands from destruction by real estate development. The current law on this thorny topic, in Florida as elsewhere, gives the state the final authority to decide whether these wetlands should be developed. The state can let the development proceed as planned when its effects on the wetlands are minimal. But whenever the effects are more substantial, the state can refuse to permit the development of the land unless the landowner agrees to “mitigate” any resultant harm to the environment. I explain further over at Defining Ideas. ”

 

 

Types of Skills Everyone Should Know – Video – Top 100 Important Skills Popular Mechanics

 

 

 

 

” 6. Find Potable Water

“Don’t exert yourself in the heat of the day,” Sanders says. “You may lose more water by sweating than you’ll gain by digging.” Ravines and valleys are carved by running water, so head for the bottom. In deserts, with only occasional flow, look for cottonwoods, willows and other light-green vegetation that grows in wet areas. When the sun or moon is low in the sky, scan the horizon for reflections that may reveal the location of small pools. (Don’t worry if the water looks scummy. Waterborne illnesses won’t kick in for at least three days; dehydration can kill in a single day.) Collect morning dew by wiping grass with a cloth, then wringing out the water. If you have plastic bags, wrapping them around the boughs of deciduous trees yields 1 or 2 ounces a day. “