Tag Archive: Fusion Centers


Tea Party, Taxes And Why The Original Patriots Would’ve Revolted Against The Surveillance State

 

We Rebelled Against Much Less

 

 

” Let’s just imagine we could transport an Internet-connected laptop back to the 1790s, when the United States was in its infancy. The technology would no doubt knock the founders out of their buckle-top boots, but once the original patriots got over the initial shock and novelty (and clearing up Wikipedia controversies, hosting an AMA and boggling over Dogecoin), the sense of marvel would give way to alarm as they realized how electronic communications could be exploited by a tyrant, such as the one from which they just freed themselves.

 As America’s first unofficial chief technologist, Benjamin Franklin would be the first to recognize the danger and take to trolling the message boards with his famous sentiment: Those who would trade liberty for safety deserve neither. (And he’d probably troll under a fake handle, using Tor, since the patriots understood that some truths are best told with anonymity.)

  Mass surveillance was not part of the original social contract—the terms of service, if you will—between Americans and their government. Untargeted surveillance is one reason we have an independent country today.

  Under the Crown’s rule, English officials used writs of assistance to indiscriminately “enter and go into any house, shop cellar, warehouse, or room or other place and, in case of resistance, to break open doors, chests, trunks, and other package there” in order to find tax evaders. Early patriot writers, such as James Otis Jr. and John Dickinson, railed against these general warrants, and it was this issue, among other oppressive conditions, that inspired the Declaration of Independence and the Fourth Amendment.

James Madison drafted clear language guaranteeing the rights of Americans, and it bears reading again in full:

 The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

EFF has the story

Daily Video 2.9.14

Ex-CIA Officer: Government’s ‘Fusion Centers’ Enable Obama ‘Turnkey Tyranny’

 

 

Published on Feb 8, 2014

” A caller identifying himself as a former law enforcement officer asked Glenn Beck’s radio audience on Thursday to look into fusion centers.
“The center is responsible for the collation of local data about citizens, and it’s forwarded to the national database,” the caller said. “Google it. Dear God, tell your audience to Google it. They need to understand what they are up against.”
Beck admitted that he had “never even heard” of fusion centers, but would look into the issue.
On his television program Thursday, Beck brought on former CIA officer and TheBlaze’s national security adviser Buck Sexton to shed more light on the matter. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A New Report Says They’re Fraught With Waste And Abuse And Have Whittled Away At Civil Liberties Protections.

 

 

 

 

 

 

” A domestic surveillance system established after the terrorist attacks of September 11 collects and shares intelligence on a mass scale about “the everyday activities of law-abiding Americans, even in the absence of reasonable suspicion,” according to a new report.

  The report, released this month by the Brennan Center for Justice, a nonpartisan policy institute at NYU School of Law, found that law enforcement data sharing programs organized by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) are fraught with waste and abuse and have whittled away at civil liberties protections while evading sufficient oversight.

  Fusion centers collect information on “such innocuous and non-criminal activities as photography, looking through binoculars, and taking notes.”

  Other activities collected by law enforcement officials and stored in fusion centers included:

  • Individuals who stay at bus or train stops for extended periods while buses and trains come and go;
  • Individuals who carry on long conversations on pay or cellular telephones; 
  • Individuals who order food at a restaurant and leave before the food arrives or who order without eating; and
  • Joggers who stand and stretch for an inordinate amount of time. “