Tag Archive: Future


Take A Peek At Windows 9

Leaked Windows 9 Screenshots Reveal The Future Of The Desktop

 

 

Windows 9

 

 

” Leaked Windows 9 screenshots have surfaced previously, but this time we’re getting a closer look at how the desktop is transforming in the future release of Windows. German sites Computer Base and WinFuture have obtained 20 photos of what appears to be the “Windows Technical Preview,” which is expected to be made available later this month or in early October. The screenshots, from a Windows build provided to close Microsoft partners, provide an even closer look at the new Start Menu, and some obvious changes to the Windows taskbar.”

 

Read more at The Verge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Outsiders: How Can Millennials Change Washington If They Hate It?

 

 

 

” Forget what you’ve read about the “Me, Me, Me Generation.” Here are four things you probably don’t know about the 95 million Americans born between 1982 and 2003:

  1. Millennials, in general, are fiercely committed to community service.
  2. They don’t see politics or government as a way to improve their communities, their country, or the world.
  3. So the best and brightest are rejecting public service as a career path. Just as Baby Boomers are retiring from government and politics, Washington faces a rising-generation “brain drain.”
  4. The only way Millennials might engage Washington is if they first radically change it.

Nearly three in five young Americans agree that elected officials seem motivated by “selfish reasons,” an increase of 5 points since 2010.

  • Fifty-six percent agree that “elected officials don’t have the same priorities that I have,” a 5-point increase.

College students increasingly prefer the private sector, graduate school, or non-profit work, according to the Partnership for Public Service’s analysis of the 2011 National Association for Colleges and Employers Student Survey. In 2008, 8.4 percent of students planned to work for local, state, and federal governments after graduation. That number reached an all-time high of 10.2 percent during the 2009 recession, before dropping to 7.4 percent in 2010.

Now, just 6 percent of college students plan to work for public sector institutions, and only 2.3 percent want to work at the federal level.

And that’s just the bureaucrats. When top-shelf talent abhors politics, it stands to reason that the pool of political candidates gets shallower. “I want to change the world,” said grad student Brian Chialinsky at the Kennedy School.  “I can’t do that in elective office.”

The trouble is that Millennials believe traditional politics and government (especially Washington) are the worst avenues to great things. They are more likely to be social entrepreneurs, working outside government to create innovative and measurably successful solutions to the nation’s problems, even if only on a relatively small scale. One is Matt Morgan, a Kennedy School student, who launched a website that helps readers respond to articles with political action. “There are so many problems Washington can’t fix that we can,” he says. Another is his classmate Sarah Estill, who wants to provide police departments with technology to fighting crime. “For my generation there are more ways we can effect change than in the past — more tools in the toolbox,” she said. “Why not use all of them?” A generation ago, government had a monopoly on public service. To Millennials, the world is filled with injustice and need, but government isn’t the solution. They have apps for that.

So will elite Millennials abandon Washington?

Nicco Mele believes so. A Kennedy School professor who oversaw the groundbreaking digital strategy for 2004 Democratic candidate Howard Dean, Mele said it’s already happening — and it’s a devastating development. “These kids are starting their own things at a rapid rate — in part because there isn’t much of a job for them in the old institutions,” he told me. “If you’re a super-talented, super-smart 22-year-old and it looks like you need to take an unpaid internship and lick envelopes to get into a field you’re interested in, forget it. Better to start something new.” Mele is an investor in ShoutAbout.org, Morgan’s website.”

 

   There is a future for the country after all . While the attitude throughout this piece in the Atlantic , heh , is one of regret and dismay that the younger generation has soured on politics and big government we here at YouViewed see this as the beginning of a sea change in public mores and a possible harbinger of a return to our Republic’s roots of individual liberty , personal responsibility and limited government . 

    So while the author presents the reader with his seemingly sorrowful lament of Statism lost , we read the story as an inspirational tale of redemption to come with a hearty “Praise To The Lord , We Are Saved” … Amen . Read the whole thing and be encouraged for our future … The signs are there , the dream of a Statist American utopia are done . They’ve tried to cross a “bridge too far” and in doing so have exposed their ideology as the spurious doctrine that it is . 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tea Party At The Crossroads

 

 

” Third parties have had an unbroken record of failure in American presidential politics. So it was refreshing to see in the Tea Party an insurgent movement, mainly of people who were not professional politicians, but who nevertheless had the good sense to see that their only chance of getting their ideals enacted into public policies was within one of the two major parties.

More important, the Tea Party was an insurgent movement that was not trying to impose some untried Utopia, but to restore the lost heritage of America that had been eroded, undermined or just plain sold out by professional politicians.

What the Tea Party was attempting was conservative, but it was also insurgent — if not radical — in the sense of opposing the root assumptions behind the dominant political trends of our times. Since those trends have included the erosion, if not the dismantling, of the Constitutional safeguards of American freedom, what the Tea Party was attempting was long overdue.

ObamaCare epitomized those trends, since its fundamental premise was that the federal government had the right to order individual Americans to buy what the government wanted them to buy, whether they wanted to or not, based on the assumption that Washington elites know what is good for us better than we know ourselves.”

    The subject of the Tea Party and it’s future is very near and dear to our hearts and thus we would like to contribute to this piece in some meaningful way but thought it best to let the esteemed Professor Sowell have the stage all to himself . We are in no way presumptuous enough to assume that we could do much in the arena of debate to advance the genius that is Thomas Sowell so we are content to leave the words to him . 

 

Part Two of this piece can be found here . Here is a sample of part two :

 

” Friend and foe alike see the Tea Party as not just a bunch of politicians trying to stay in office, but people with a purpose beyond going along to get along. The left’s desperate — and dishonest — efforts to discredit the Tea Party show that they understand its threat to their expanding government agenda.

The question is whether the Tea Party itself still has its eye on the ball — the goals it was formed to serve — or is letting itself get preoccupied with its battle against other Republicans.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 … Just 12 Light Years Away

 

” One of the closest stars to our own, Tau Ceti, appears to have five planets, including one that’s in the so-called habitable zone and could be suitable for life.

 

 

 

 

Not only is Tau Ceti a near neighbor, at 12 light years away, it has the same spectral classification as our sun. Previously, the nearest planet believed to be capable of supporting life – found just last month – was 42 light years away. “

 

110 Predictions For the Next 110 Years

 

 

 

 

 

” · People will be fluent in every language. With DARPA and Google racing to perfect instant translation, it won’t be long until your cellphone speaks Swahili on your behalf.

· Software will predict traffic jams before they occur. Using archived data, roadside sensors, and GPS, IBM has come up with a modeling program that anticipates bumper-to-bumper congestion a full hour before it begins. Better yet, the idea proved successful in early tests—even on the Jersey Turnpike.

· Climate-controlled jackets will protect soldiers from extreme heat and cold. The secret to all-weather clothing, according to former MIT student Kranthi Vistakula, is Peltier plates, which can be used to warm you up or cool you down by sending an electric current across the junction between two different metals. U.S. soldiers have put the lightweight tech to the test. So have soldiers in India. Based on early reviews, it won’t be long until others enlist.

· Nanoparticles will make chemotherapy far more effective. By delivering tiny doses of cisplatin and docetaxel right to cancerous cells, the mini messengers will significantly reduce the pain and side effects of today’s treatments. “