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Tag Archive: Gatling Gun


Terrorist Killer US Military GAU 19B 50 Cal Gatling Gun

 

 

 

Published on Oct 27, 2014

” Another great weapon for the US military and us army. Could prove useful in combating terrorists in Iraq and Syria. The GECAL 50, officially designated by the United States military as the GAU-19/A, is an electrically driven Gatling gun that fires the .50 BMG (12.7×99mm) cartridge.

Technical specifications

  The GAU-19/A is designed for a linkless feed, but can be fed from a standard M9 linked belt if a delinker feeder is used. The rate of fire is selectable to be either 1,000 or 2,000 rounds per minute. The Humvee armament kit version fires at 1,300 rounds per minute. The average recoil force when firing is 500 pounds-force (2.2 kN). In January 2012, General Dynamics announced they would be delivering a new version designated the GAU-19/B. It provides the same firepower in a lighter platform, weighing 106 lbs.[1]
History

  The GECAL 50 was first manufactured by General Electric, then by Lockheed Martin, and now by General Dynamics. Design work began in 1982. Early prototypes had six barrels, but a three-barreled configuration is now standard. The GAU-19/A was originally designed as a larger, more potent version of the M134 Minigun. Due to the loss of nine helicopters in Grenada GE started building prototypes of the weapon in both a three-barreled and a six-barreled configuration. The six-barreled version was designed to fire 4,000 rpm, and could be adapted to fire up to 8,000 rpm. The GAU-19 takes 0.4 seconds to reach maximum firing rate.[2] Soon it was recommended as a potential armament for the V-22 Osprey.[3] The magazine would be located underneath the cabin floor and could be reloaded in-flight. However, plans to mount the gun were later dropped.[4] In 2005, the GAU-19/A was approved to be mounted on the OH-58D Kiowa helicopter. It also could have been used on the Army’s now cancelled ARH-70.[5] In January 2012, the U.S. Army ordered 24 GAU-19/B versions for use on helicopters. All were delivered by the next month.[1]

  In 1999, the United States sent 28 GAU-19s to Colombia.[6] Oman is known to use the GAU-19/A mounted on their HMMWVs. The navy of Mexico uses MDH MD-902 series helicopters with the GAU-19/A system mounted for anti-narcotics operations.[7]
Users

Colombia: Used by Drug Enforcement troops, and the Colombian national police
Japan: Used by Japan Coast Guard, on PC Kagayuki class
Mexico: Used by the Mexican Air Force and the Mexican Navy in Humvees, UH-60 Black Hawks and the MD Explorer
Oman: Used on Army HMMWV.
United States
Gatling Gun History

  The Gatling gun is one of the best-known early rapid-fire weapons and a forerunner of the modern machine gun. Invented by Richard Gatling, it is known for its use by the Union forces during the American Civil War in the 1860s, which was the first time it was employed in combat. Later it was used in the Boshin War, the Anglo-Zulu War and still later in the assault on San Juan Hill during the Spanish-American War.[1]

  The Gatling gun’s operation centered on a cyclic multi-barrel design which facilitated cooling and synchronized the firing/reloading sequence. Each barrel fired a single shot when it reached a certain point in the cycle, after which it ejected the spent cartridge, loaded a new round, and in the process, allowed the barrel to cool somewhat. This configuration allowed higher rates of fire to be achieved without the barrel overheating.
History

Patent drawing for R.J. Gatling’s Battery Gun, 9 May 1865.

  The Gatling gun was designed by the American inventor Dr. Richard J. Gatling in 1861 and patented on November 4, 1862.[2][3] Gatling wrote that he created it to reduce the size of armies and so reduce the number of deaths by combat and disease, and to show how futile war is.[4]
Although the first Gatling gun was capable of firing continuously, it required a person to crank it; therefore it was not a true automatic weapon. The Maxim gun, invented in 1884, was the first true fully automatic weapon, making use of the fired projectile’s recoil force to reload the weapon. Nonetheless, the Gatling gun represented a huge leap in firearm technology.

  Prior to the Gatling gun, the only weapons available to militaries capable of firing many projectiles in a short space of time were mass-firing volley weapons like the French Reffye mitrailleuse in 1870–1871, or field cannons firing canister, much like a very large shotgun. The latter were widely used during and after the Napoleonic Wars. Although the maximum rate of fire was increased by firing multiple projectiles simultaneously, these weapons still needed to be reloaded after each discharge, which for multi-barrel systems like the mitrailleuse was cumbersome and time-consuming. This negated much of the advantage of their high rate of fire per discharge, making them much less powerful on the battlefield. In comparison, the Gatling gun offered a rapid and continuous rate of fire without having to manually reload by opening the breech.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday Firepower With A User Submit From The Knob Creek Machine Gun Shoot (54 Photos)

 

 

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   A little video would probably be welcome , don’t you think ? Nothing quite like moving pictures to convey the awesomeness of  firepower.

 

 

 

Published on Apr 13, 2013

” Great footage from the 2013 Knob Creek Machine Gun Shoot including sub machine guns: the 1928 Thompson, Grease Gun, British Sten Gun, AK-47, as well as short video from the gun show building showing various mounted displays including new .4570 Gatling guns, the GE Minigun and various air and water cooled bi and tripod mounted machine guns. The video also includes footage from the upper range day shoot with numerous high caliber machine guns and cannons firing at once including in some cases tracers and exploding rounds, and closeup footage of a machine pistol, the Browning M1919 mounted machine gun and the M-60 machine gun.”

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No display of firepower would be complete without some nighttime shooting …

 

 

Day Or Night , Firepower Is Awesome

Guns of the (Union) Grunt: 1863

 

 

Spencer Repeater Carbine

 

 

” Some 150 years ago, the US Army was in the midst of the most brutal war it would ever be a part of, the Civil War. In five years of open combat more than 620,000 Union soldiers died from a population of just over 34-million Americans, nearly 2% of the total population. If these figures were adjusted against today’s population, this would be nearly 6-million killed. These are the weapons they carried into combat against other Americans, those under a Confederate flag.

The Springfield 1861 Rifle

Some 2,213,363 men served in the Union Army during the Civil War, and by 1863, most Yankees carried a Springfield Rifle. While many other longarms were carried by the army and militia including the Pattern 1853 Enfield, the Austrian Lorenz rifle, and the legacy Springfield flintlocks of previous wars, it was the 1861 series Springfield Rifle that armed the majority of bluecoats. It was also the first mass-produced US-made rifle manufactured in large quantities. In fact, more than a million were built not only by Springfield but also by nearly two dozen subcontractors to supply the largest army seen in North America up to that time.”