Tag Archive: GE


‘Intelligent’ Streetlights To ‘Watch’ Florida Residents

 

 

” The Jacksonville, Florida, city government is preparing to install more than 50 “intelligent” streetlights under a new General Electric pilot program.

  In accordance with the “GE Intelligent City Initiative,” the “data-collecting” LED streetlights will be placed throughout the city’s downtown and surrounding areas.

  According to a Thursday morning presentation by GE, the lights will be “interconnected with one another and will collect real-time data,” as reported by the Jacksonville Business Journal.

“ GE’s intelligent LEDs are a gateway to city-changing technology, with sensors, controls, wireless transmitters and microprocessors built within the LED system,” GE states.”

 

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Industry, Not Environmentalists, Killed Traditional Bulbs

 

 

 

” The 2007 Energy Bill, a stew of regulations and subsidies, set mandatory efficiency standards for most light bulbs. Any bulbs that couldn’t produce a given brightness at the specified energy input would be illegal. That meant the 25-cent bulbs most Americans used in nearly every socket of their home would be outlawed.

  People often assume green regulations like this represent the triumph of environmental activists trying to save the planet. That’s rarely the case, and it wasn’t here. Light bulb manufacturers whole-heartedly supported the efficiency standards. General Electric, Sylvania and Philips — the three companies that dominated the bulb industry — all backed the 2007 rule, while opposing proposals to explicitly outlaw incandescent technology (thus leaving the door open for high-efficiency incandescents).

  This wasn’t a case of an industry getting on board with an inevitable regulation in order to tweak it. The lighting industry was the main reason the legislation was moving. As the New York Times reported in 2011, “Philips formed a coalition with environmental groups including the Natural Resources Defense Council to push for higher standards.” “

 

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General Electric, Google And Microsoft Are Three Of The Nine S&P 500 Companies That Currently Have More Cash-On-Hand Than The U.S. Government

 

Poorhouse: The U.S. government currently has less money than nine S&P 500 companies

 

 

 

” It was just a few short years ago when the United States government was forced to bailout the auto industry, and now the tables have turned – the United States government currently has less cash on hand than at least one automaker, as well as eight other Standard & Poor’s 500 companies.

As politicians in Washington D.C. continue their seemingly endless debate on whether to raise the country’s debt ceiling (the amount of debt lawmakers authorize the Treasury to enter into), the U.S. is running out of money to pay the bills it’s already incurred.

At the moment, the Treasury has only $32 billion in its operating accounts. In contrast, General Electric currently has nearly three times that amount of accessible cash – currently, GE has more than $88 billion in cash-on-hand.

According to a graph created by QZ.com, GE tops the list of companies with more moulah than the U.S. government. Also on that list is Microsoft with $77 billion, Google with nearly $55 billion and Cisco with $50 billion.

Ford also made the list with $36 billion (Ford is one of the few domestic automakers that did not accept bailout money).

General Motors – which received nearly $50 billion in bailout cash from the U.S. government starting in 2008 – now trails the federal government in cash-on-hand by a mere $3 billion (GM currently has $27 billion in its coffers).”

    There should be no surprise that GE is flush with cash given that they pay next to no taxes . The best news is that Ford , which took no bailout money from the taxpayers is doing so well . GM on the other hand , still owes the taxpayers a bundle and that doesn’t take into account the value of the lost investments of bond holders screwed by Obama to placate his union cronies during the bankruptcy .