In Texas, Search Warrants Can Now Be Based On A “Prediction Of A Future Crime”

 

 

” Police in Parker County had been watching Michael Fred Wehrenberg’s home for a month when, late in the summer of 2010, they received a tip from a confidential informant that Wehrenberg and several others were “fixing to” cook meth. Hours later, after midnight, officers walked through the front door, rounded up the people inside, and kept them in handcuffs in the front yard for an hour and a half. 

  The only potential problem, at least from a constitutional standpoint, was that the cops didn’t have a search warrant. They got one later … “

 “But the actions of police in the case don’t pass the smell test,” he writes. “If their informant was so credible, why not go to the judge for a search warrant in the 3-4 hours before their illegal entry? The judge was available in the middle of the night, so there’s little basis to believe they couldn’t have gotten it earlier. And why conceal the fact that they’d already swept the house and detained the suspects in the search warrant application if everything was on the up and up?”

   He has a kindred spirit in CCA Judge Lawrence Meyers, who was the only justice to dissent. As Meyers wrote, “it is obvious to me that this search warrant was obtained based upon the officers’ unlawful entry into [Wehrenberg]’s residence.”

 

 

Increasingly the courts are becoming merely another arm of the State .