Tag Archive: Immunity


Your Personality Could Influence How You Fight Disease

 

 

 

” When you break it down, personality can be defined as a collection of distinct psychological traits which remain fairly constant over time and therefore shape the way we react to the world around us. These traits include extroversion/introversion (how sociable we are), neuroticism (the tendency towards negativity) and conscientiousness (which includes how cautious we are and how carefully we plan). We all know where we fall on these various scales and how it impacts our friendship circle, the way we perform our jobs and even how we cope with adversity — but can it actually affect our health?

  In a recent study, Kavita Vadhara and colleagues correlated different personality traits with biological immune responses — that is, how geared up our body is to deal with threats to our immune system. And the results of their research led to some interesting insights into how personality type may affect our immune system.

  The team asked 121 healthy students to complete personality questionnaires to assess, among other traits, extroversion, neuroticism and conscientiousness. They also took blood samples and from these they investigated the activity of 19 different genes involved in inflammatory immune response, as well as genes involved in defense against viruses. “

 

Read more at Mashable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lerner Likely Waived The Fifth And Can Be Held In Contempt

 

 

 

” While Lois Lerner’s reassertion of the Fifth Amendment, as well as the confrontation between Committee Chairman Darrell Issa (R–Calif.) and Rep. Elijah Cummings (D–Md.), soaked up all of the media coverage of the  IRS scandal last week, one interesting news item did not get much attention: the revelation by Lerner’s attorney, William Taylor III, that Lerner had given “a lengthy interview to Justice Department prosecutors within the last six months.” Even more surprising was Taylor’s admission that Lerner gave DOJ her testimony without getting any immunity from prosecutors.

  If that is true, the former IRS official’s reassertion of the privilege against self-incrimination at the March 5 hearing of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform is problematic. While the prevailing rule in most federal courts is that a waiver of the Fifth Amendment privilege at one proceeding does not carry through to another proceeding, that is not the rule in the District of Columbia.

  In Ellis v. U.S. (1969), the D.C. Court of Appeals specifically refused to adopt that rule, saying it was “unsound.” As the court held, “once a witness has voluntarily spoken out, we do not see how his protected interest is jeopardized by testifying in a subsequent proceeding, provided he is not required to disclose matters of substance which are unknown to the Government.” Under those circumstances, the court held, a person can reassert the privilege only if there is a “real danger of further criminalization.”

  Ellis involved a defendant who voluntarily testified before a grand jury but then refused to testify at trial, asserting his Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination. Similarly, if Lerner—without receiving a grant of immunity—voluntarily spoke to Justice Department prosecutors and/or FBI agents involved in investigating IRS targeting of conservative groups, she cannot now invoke the privilege to avoid answering congressional questions that would require her to give the same information she has already provided to criminal investigators.”

 

    This sounds like very good news for those of us that want to know the truth . Read more from  Hans von Spakovsky at Heritage

 Illustration by Gary Varvel

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obamacare To Hit Home On Hill

 

 

 

” Capitol Hill is about to get up close and personal with Obamacare.

As in being covered by Obamacare next year.

During debate over the law in 2009, Republicans insisted that if members of Congress were going to put their fellow Americans into health care exchanges, they and their staffs should be in there, too.

“It’s necessary and only fair for Congress to live under the rules we pass for everyone else,” said Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley, one of several Republicans who pushed for that requirement.

But vague language in this part of the law — which was passed three years ago this Saturday — has led to a slew of quirks and questions.

Staffers who work in lawmakers’ personal offices go into exchanges — but those who work for committees don’t. And the lawmakers themselves get Obamacare — unless they are among the roughly 40 senators and 115 House members on Medicare.

And there’s a big thorny unresolved question about money: whether members and staffers in exchanges will still get a significant part of their health insurance premiums subsidized by their employer, just like other government workers. If they lose that subsidy, it’s like getting a pay cut of several thousand dollars.

“The sad thing is, too many Americans will be dealing with this in 2014 — not just Hill staffers,” said Courtney Austin Lawrence, legislative director for Rep. Bill Cassidy (R-La.). “My general concern with the exchange and Obamacare goes far beyond my own individual coverage. I think it’s a bad policy for taxpayers, patients and physicians.” “

 

 

Illustration by Bob Gorrell