Tag Archive: Improvised Explosive Devices


Threat Report: How The U.S. Plans To Battle Terrorism On Land, Sea, And Air

 

 

” Protecting the United States from violent extremists requires creativity, hard work, and technological expertise. Here are a few of the more dire threats—and the counterterrorism technology to thwart them.”

Image: Robert Atanasovski/AFP/Getty Images 

” War and revolution in the Middle East have opened military arsenals in Libya and Iraq to extremists and black markets. This is not good no matter what the bad guys buy, but it’s especially dangerous if terrorists get their hands on shoulder-fired antiaircraft missiles. Though many international flights avoid taking paths over known conflict areas where they might be at risk even at 35,000 feet, shoulder-fired missiles are portable and could be smuggled near enough to an international airport to do serious damage to planes during takeoff and landing. Missiles like the heat-seeking Russian Iglas, which are already in Iraq, can fire up to 11,000 feet in the air along a 2-mile-long corridor, making most airports viable targets. “

Image: Akradecki at en.wikipedia

” Systems that can protect airplanes from missiles do exist. Some U.S. military transport planes are already equipped with Directional Infrared Countermeasures (DIRCM) pods that can blind incoming missiles. A 550-pound pod mounted under the fuselage uses a laser to beam infrared energy into the missile’s heatseeker, overwhelming the sensor and causing the missile to lose its target. In the last decade two defense manufacturers, BAE Systems and Northrop Grumman, made prototypes for civilian airliners. But they were too expensive to employ widely. The only way the airlines will ever consider them a good return on investment is if shooting down civilian airliners becomes a regular threat. “

Read more about future terrorist threats and the countermeasures fielded by the forces of civilization at Popular Mechanics

Man Accused Of Carrying Improvised Explosives On New Jersey Train

 

 

 

” A Jersey City man was charged with having explosives material at his home and on a train just days before the Boston Marathon bombings, but authorities said there was no indication he planned to detonate the devices, the Jersey Journal reported on Thursday.

The article on the paper’s website also said the man, Mykyta Panasenko, 27, was charged in New Jersey state court and released.

Panasenko was charged with having at his home on April 5 two improvised explosive devices made from a cylinder containing the propellant powder Pyrodex, the newspaper reported.

He was also charged with recklessly creating widespread risk of injury or damage to a building by constructing the devices, and with having the explosives material on April 7 aboard a NJ Transit Train leaving Hoboken, New Jersey, and bound for Suffern, New York, the paper said.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bomb-Blast Forensics: The First Steps

 

 

 

” Even as the police and doctors treat the wounded, the forensic investigation into the explosions at the Boston Marathon will begin. 

“The forensics start as soon as people realize there’s been an explosion,” says Tom Thurman, of Eastern Kentucky University. 

Thurman knows a lot about bomb investigations. Before his retirement from the FBI in 1998, Thurman was the chief of the FBI Bomb Data Center; he also worked

 Pan American Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland; the bombing deaths of a federal judge in Alabama and an attorney in Georgia, both in 1989; and the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center in New York. 

The first thing to do is to determine if the explosions were intentional. “What’s there that could spark an accidental explosion?” Thurman asks. If no likely sources for an accidental detonation are found—like a buildup of flammable vapors—the investigators start looking at other evidence. “