Tag Archive: Individual and group rights


Senate Website Says 2nd Amendment Unclear: Rights May Be ‘Collective’

 

 

The Senate’s official website page on the Constitution says the Second Amendment right to bear arms could be a collective right, not an individual freedom.

The website explains the Second Amendment this way: “Whether this provision protects the individual’s right to own firearms or whether it deals only with the collective right of the people to arm and maintain a militia has long been debated.”

The Bill of Rights, however, was the Founding Father’s way of guaranteeing each and every individual their “unalienable rights,” as “endowed” by God. On top of that, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled — at least twice in the past five years — that the Second Amendment is an individual right, Breitbart reported.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cato Home Study Course, Vol. 1: The Ideas of Liberty

 

 

 

” The classical liberal, or libertarian, approach to morality and politics brings together related themes that will be both placed in their historical context and woven together more tightly in the coming modules. In this module, the basic ideas of individual and imprescriptible rights, spontaneous order, and the rule of law are presented and examined. Each of these ideas is implicated in the others: the spontaneous order of the free society is built on a foundation of secure individual rights, and law is intimately connected with liberty, for to be free in society is for all to be equally subjected to the same known law, a law that allows us to coordinate our activities with others and thus to create complex forms of social order. The deep roots of these ideas, reaching back into antiquity, give libertarianism a solidity other political philosophies lack.

Libertarianism draws on a multitude of different sciences, or organized bodies of knowledge, including history, philosophy, economics, sociology, anthropology, and law. Thus, “The Ideas of Liberty” devotes some attention to the status of the human sciences and to the meaning and importance of the principles of intentionality and methodological individualism in properly grounded social science. In addition to laying bare the scientific misunderstandings and equivocations that lie at the foundation of collectivist thinking, “The Ideas of Liberty” explores the relationships of the individual to the group, of action and design to order, of society to the state, of coercion to persuasion, and of “natural law” to “positive law.” The ideas of natural law, natural rights, and “self-proprietorship” are traced through history, from the ancient Greeks to modern times, and used to illuminate the proper relationships between persons and between persons and governments. There is also a careful discussion of the relationship between “rights” thinking and “utilitarianism,” which have been alleged by some philosophers to be mortal enemies. The confusion is eliminated by seeing “utility,” or good consequences, as the goal, and rights as the standard against which policies and practice are judged.

Above all, libertarian ideas are seen as emerging from a long history, rather than as springing full blown from the head of this or that particular philosopher. The treatment of the relationship between the “liberty of the ancients” and “the liberty of the moderns” by Benjamin Constant, included in the readings, is a clear statement of classical liberal thinking and a rebuttal to “communitarian” criticisms of liberal individualism.”