Tag Archive: Internet Privacy


Mark Zuckerberg’s Call To Obama Was Not About Privacy

 

 

 

 

 

” Mark Zuckerberg is not happy with the way the American government conducts surveillance on the Internet, so much so that he called President Obama to complain about it and then wrote a post Thursday on Facebook to vent his frustration. “The U.S. government should be the champion for the internet, not a threat,” he said.

  Some observers have pointed out that Mr. Zuckerberg’s comments are ironic because Facebook, the company he co-founded and runs, has a spotty record when it comes to protecting the privacy of its users. The company has been criticized for changing its privacy policy in ways that make it harder for users to control who can see the information that they have posted to the social network.

  But it is worth noting that Mr. Zuckerberg never mentions the word “privacy” in his post.”

 

 

    All appearances to the contrary , Zuckerberg’s concerns lie with profit not privacy . The man cares not a whit for your privacy or anyone else’s . He only cares that the NSA surveillance has unmasked exactly how co-operative the web giants have been with the Feds and so is interfering with their bottom lines . Typical hypocrisy .

 

 

” In other words, Mr. Zuckerberg has not really transformed into an advocate for greater privacy. He is just protecting the interests of his company.”

 

 

 

Read the entire Times piece

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2013 Is The Year That Proved Your ‘Paranoid’ Friend Right

 

 

” Most people involved in the tech scene have at least one friend who has been warning everyone they know about protecting their digital trail for years — and have watched that friend get accused of being being a tinfoil-hat-wearing conspiracy theorist. But 2013 is the year that proved your “paranoid” friend right.

  It’s now a matter of public record that the NSA collects and stores the calling records of domestic phone calls, tracks the location of millions of mobile devices worldwide,infiltrates the data links between the data centers of tech companies used by millions of Americans, piggybacks onto commercial tracking mechanisms, collected potentially sensitive online metadata for years and actively worked to undermine the privacy and security measures that underpin the Internet. And considering the purported size of the Snowden cache, that could be the tip of the metaphorical iceberg.”

 

Source: Washington Post

 

 

 

 

 

 

Angry Over U.S. Surveillance, Tech Giants Bolster Defenses

 

 

 

 

” Google has spent months and millions of dollars encrypting email, search queries and other information flowing among its data centers worldwide. Facebook’s chief executive said at a conference this fall that the government “blew it.” And though it has not been announced publicly, Twitter plans to set up new types of encryption to protect messages from snoops.

It is all reaction to reports of how far the government has gone in spying on Internet users, sneaking around tech companies to tap into their systems without their knowledge or cooperation.

What began as a public relations predicament for America’s technology companies has evolved into a moral and business crisis that threatens the foundation of their businesses, which rests on consumers and companies trusting them with their digital lives.

So they are pushing back in various ways — from cosmetic tactics like publishing the numbers of government requests they receive to political ones including tense conversations with officials behind closed doors. And companies are building technical fortresses intended to make the private information in which they trade inaccessible to the government and other suspected spies.

Yet even as they take measures against government collection of personal information, their business models rely on collecting that same data, largely to sell personalized ads. So no matter the steps they take, as long as they remain ad companies, they will be gathering a trove of information that will prove tempting to law enforcement and spies.

When reports of surveillance by the National Security Agency surfaced in June, the companies were frustrated at the exposure of their cooperation with the government in complying with lawful requests for the data of foreign users, and they scrambled to explain to customers that they had no choice but to obey the requests.

But as details of the scope of spying emerge, frustration has turned to outrage, and cooperation has turned to war.

The industry has learned that it knew of only a fraction of the spying, and it is grappling with the risks of being viewed as an enabler of surveillance of foreigners and American citizens. “

   Read the whole thing . It would be great to be able to have some faith in the internet giant’s mea culpas , but given their previous level of co-operation with the State , it is hard for us to view their alleged new efforts at privacy as anything other than a quest for market share .