Tag Archive: Jazz


Happy Birthday Fats Waller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biography

” Not only was Fats Waller one of the greatest pianists jazz has ever known, he was also one of its most exuberantly funny entertainers — and as so often happens, one facet tends to obscure the other. His extraordinarily light and flexible touch belied his ample physical girth; he could swing as hard as any pianist alive or dead in his classic James P. Johnson-derived stride manner, with a powerful left hand delivering the octaves and tenths in a tireless, rapid, seamless stream. Waller also pioneered the use of the pipe organ and Hammond organ in jazz — he called the pipe organ the “God box” — adapting his irresistible sense of swing to the pedals and a staccato right hand while making imaginative changes of the registration. As a composer and improviser, his melodic invention rarely flagged, and he contributed fistfuls of joyous yet paradoxically winsome songs like “Honeysuckle Rose,” “Ain’t Misbehavin,'” “Keepin’ Out of Mischief Now,” “Blue Turning Grey Over You” and the extraordinary “Jitterbug Waltz” to the jazz repertoire.

  During his lifetime and afterwards, though, Fats Waller was best known to the world for his outsized comic personality and sly vocals, where he would send up trashy tunes that Victor Records made him record with his nifty combo, Fats Waller & His Rhythm. Yet on virtually any of his records, whether the song is an evergreen standard or the most trite bit of doggerel that a Tin Pan Alley hack could serve up, you will hear a winning combination of good knockabout humor, foot-tapping rhythm and fantastic piano playing. Today, almost all of Fats Waller‘s studio recordings can be found on RCA’s on-again-off-again series The Complete Fats Waller, which commenced on LPs in 1975 and was still in progress during the 1990s.” Continue reading

Discography

More videos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bill Evans & Robben Ford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published on Mar 20, 2013

” Copyrights: BMG Rights Management
Bill Evans & Robben Ford – Soulgrass meets Blues, Miles & Beyond
(Estival Jazz Lugano 2010)
1. Lateral Climb
2. Cool Eddie
3. Don’t Worry ’bout Me
4. Oasis
5. Celtic Junction
6. Don’t Let The Sun Catch You Crying
7. Sweet Tea
8. Supernatural
9. Ode To The Working Man
10. Spoonful
Robben Ford – guitar
Bill Evans – saxophone
Etienne Mbappe – bass
Ryan Cavanaugh – banjo
Toss Panos – drums “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Ella Fitzgerald

 

 

Wiki Biography

 

” Ella Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as the “First Lady of Song“, “Queen of Jazz“, and “Lady Ella”, was an American jazz vocalist with a vocal range spanning three octaves (D♭3 to D♭6). She was noted for her purity of tone, impeccable diction, phrasing and intonation, and a “horn-like” improvisational ability, particularly in her scat singing.

Fitzgerald was a notable interpreter of the Great American Songbook. Over the course of her 59-year recording career, she sold 40 million copies of her 70-plus albums, won 13 Grammy Awards and was awarded the National Medal of Arts by Ronald Reagan and the Presidential Medal of Freedom by George H. W. Bush.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early Life

 

” Fitzgerald was born in Newport News, Virginia, the daughter of William and Temperance “Tempie” Fitzgerald. The pair separated soon after her birth, and Ella and her mother went to Yonkers, New York, where they eventually moved in with Tempie’s longtime boyfriend, Joseph Da Silva. Fitzgerald’s half-sister, Frances Da Silva, was born in 1923. She and her family were Methodists and were active in the Bethany African Methodist Episcopal Church, and she regularly attended worship services, Bible study, and Sunday School.

In her youth, Fitzgerald wanted to be a dancer, although she loved listening to jazz recordings by Louis ArmstrongBing Crosby and The Boswell Sisters. She idolized the lead singer Connee Boswell, later saying, “My mother brought home one of her records, and I fell in love with it….I tried so hard to sound just like her.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” In 1932, her mother died from a heart attack. Following this trauma, Fitzgerald’s grades dropped dramatically, and she frequently skipped school. Abused by her stepfather, she ran away to her aunt and, at one point, worked as a lookout at a bordello and also with a Mafia-affiliated numbers runner. When the authorities caught up with her, she was first placed in the Colored Orphan Asylum in Riverdale, Bronx. However, when the orphanage proved too crowded, she was moved to the New York Training School for Girls in Hudson, New York, a state reformatory. Eventually she escaped and for a time was homeless.”

 

 

 

Early Career

 

” She made her singing debut at 17 on November 21, 1934, at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, New York. She pulled in a weekly audience at the Apollo and won the opportunity to compete in one of the earliest of its famous “Amateur Nights”. She had originally intended to go on stage and dance, but, intimidated by the Edwards Sisters, a local dance duo, she opted to sing instead in the style of Connee Boswell. She sang Boswell’s “Judy” and “The Object of My Affection,” a song recorded by the Boswell Sisters, and won the first prize of US$ 25.00.

In January 1935, Fitzgerald won the chance to perform for a week with the Tiny Bradshaw band at the Harlem Opera House. She met drummer and bandleader Chick Webb there. Webb had already hired singer Charlie Linton to work with the band and was, The New York Times later wrote, “reluctant to sign her….because she was gawky and unkempt, a diamond in the rough.” Webb offered her the opportunity to test with his band when they played a dance at Yale University.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” She began singing regularly with Webb’s Orchestra through 1935 at Harlem’s Savoy Ballroom. Fitzgerald recorded several hit songs with them, including “Love and Kisses” and “(If You Can’t Sing It) You’ll Have to Swing It (Mr. Paganini)“. But it was her 1938 version of the nursery rhyme, “A-Tisket, A-Tasket“, a song she co-wrote, that brought her wide public acclaim.

Chick Webb died on June 16, 1939, and his band was renamed “Ella and her Famous Orchestra” with Ella taking on the role of nominal bandleader. Fitzgerald recorded nearly 150 songs with the orchestra before it broke up in 1942, “the majority of them novelties and disposable pop fluff”.”

 

 

 

Rising Jazz Star

” Going out on her own, Ella Fitzgerald landed a deal with Decca Records. She recorded some hit songs with the Ink Spots and Louis Jordan in the early 1940s. Fitzgerald also made her film debut in 1942’s comedy western Ride ‘Em Cowboy with Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. Her career really began to take off in 1946 when she started working with Norman Granz. Granz orchestrated the Jazz at the Philharmonic, which was a series of concerts and live records featuring most of the genre’s great performers. Fitzgerald also hired Granz to become her manager.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Around this time, Fitzgerald went on tour with Dizzy Gillespie and his band. She started changing her singing style, incorporating scat singing during her performances with Gillespie. Fitzgerald also fell in love with Gillespie’s bass player Ray Brown. The pair wed in 1947, and they adopted a child born to Fitzgerald’s half-sister whom they named Raymond “Ray” Brown Jr. The marriage ended in 1952.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 1950s and ’60s proved to be a time of critical and commercial success for Fitzgerald. She even earned the moniker “The First Lady of Song” for her mainstream popularity and unparalleled vocal talents. Her unique ability to mimicking instrumental sounds helped popularize the vocal improvisation of “scatting” which became her signature technique.”

 

 

 

 

 

” In 1955, Fitzgerald began recording for Granz’s newly created Verve Records. She made some of her most popular albums for Verve, starting out with 1956’s Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Cole Porter Song Book. Two years later, Fitzgerald picked up her first two Grammy Awards for two later songbook projects—Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Duke Ellington Song Book and Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Irving Berlin Song Book. She actually worked directly with Ellington on that album.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” A truly collaborative soul, Fitzgerald produced great recordings with such artists as Louis Armstrong and Count Basie. She also performed several times with Frank Sinatra over the years as well. In 1960, Fitzgerald actually broke into the pop charts with her rendition of “Mack the Knife.” She was still going strong well into the ’70s, playing concerts across the globe. One especially memorable concert series from this time was a two-week engagement in New York City in 1974 with Frank Sinatra and Count Basie.”

 

 

Worldwide Recognition

 

” Ella continued to work as hard as she had early on in her career, despite the ill effects on her health. She toured all over the world, sometimes performing two shows a day in cities hundreds of miles apart. In 1974, Ella spent a legendary two weeks performing in New York with Frank Sinatra and Count Basie. Still going strong five years later, she was inducted into the Down Beat magazine Hall of Fame, and received Kennedy Center Honors for her continuing contributions to the arts.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” Outside of the arts, Ella had a deep concern for child welfare. Though this aspect of her life was rarely publicized, she frequently made generous donations to organizations for disadvantaged youths, and the continuation of these contributions was part of the driving force that prevented her from slowing down. Additionally, when Frances died, Ella felt she had the additional responsibilities of taking care of her sister’s family.

In 1987, United States President Ronald Reagan awarded Ella the National Medal of Arts. It was one of her most prized moments. France followed suit several years later, presenting her with their Commander of Arts and Letters award, while Yale, Dartmouth and several other universities bestowed Ella with honorary doctorates.”

 

 

 

 

 

” In September of 1986, Ella underwent quintuple coronary bypass surgery. Doctors also replaced a valve in her heart and diagnosed her with diabetes, which they blamed for her failing eyesight. The press carried rumors that she would never be able to sing again, but Ella proved them wrong. Despite protests by family and friends, including Norman, Ella returned to the stage and pushed on with an exhaustive schedule.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” By the 1990s, Ella had recorded over 200 albums. In 1991, she gave her final concert at New York’s renowned Carnegie Hall. It was the 26th time she performed there.

As the effects from her diabetes worsened, 76-year-old Ella experienced severe circulatory problems and was forced to have both of her legs amputated below the knees. She never fully recovered from the surgery, and afterward, was rarely able to perform. During this time, Ella enjoyed sitting outside in her backyard, and spending time with Ray, Jr. and her granddaughter Alice. “I just want to smell the air, listen to the birds and hear Alice laugh,” she said.

On June 15, 1996, Ella Fitzgerald died in her Beverly Hills home. Hours later, signs of remembrance began to appear all over the world. A wreath of white flowers stood next to her star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and a marquee outside the Hollywood Bowl theater read, “Ella, we will miss you.”

After a private memorial service, traffic on the freeway was stopped to let her funeral procession pass through. She was laid to rest in the “Sanctuary of the Bells” section of the Sunset Mission Mausoleum at Inglewood Park Cemetery in Inglewood, California. “

 

 

 

 

 

Ella Fitzgerald

 

April 25, 1918-June 15, 1996

 

Discography

Albums

Souvenir Album

‎ (10″, Album)

Decca 1949  

Ella Sings Gershwin

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Brunswick 1950  

Songs In A Mellow Mood

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Decca 1954  

Peggy Lee And Ella Fitzgerald – Songs From Pete Kelly’s Blues ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Decca 1955  

Ella FitzgeraldLena Horne , and Billie Holiday – Ella, Lena, And Billie ‎ (LP)

Columbia 1955  

Sweet And Hot

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Brunswick 1956  

Sings The Cole Porter Songbook

‎ ◄ (17 versions)

Verve Records 1956  

Sings The Rodgers And Hart Song Book

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve Records 1956  

Like Someone In Love

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve Records 1957  

Ella And Her Fellas

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Decca 1957  

Ella Fitzgerald / Count Basie / Joe Williams – One O’Clock Jump ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1957  

Ella Fitzgerald With Duke Ellington And His Orchestra – Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Duke Ellington Song Book ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1957  

Ella Fitzgerald With Duke Ellington And His Orchestra – Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Duke Ellington Song Book Vol. 2 ‎ (2xLP, Mono)

Verve Records 1957  

Ella Fitzgerald & Billie Holiday – At Newport ‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1958  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Duke Ellington Song Book, Vol. 1

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1958  

Ella Fitzgerald At The Opera House

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1958  

Sings The Irving Berlin Songbook

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1958  

Ella Swings Lightly

‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Verve Records 1958  

The First Lady Of Song

‎ (LP, Mono)

Decca 1958  

Hello Love

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Get Happy

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve RecordsVerve Records 1959  

Sings The Rodgers And Hart Songbook Volume 2

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Sings The Rodgers And Hart Song Book Volume 1

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Song Book – Volume One 

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Song Book (Volume Two)

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Sings The George & Ira Gershwin Song Book Vol. 5

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Gershwin Song Book Vol. 2

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Sings Sweet Songs For Swingers

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Gershwin Song Book Vol. 1

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1959  

Ella Wishes You A Swinging Christmas

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Verve Records 1960  

Mack The Knife – Ella In Berlin

‎ ◄ (31 versions)

Verve Records 1960  

Sings The Rodgers And Hart Song Book Volume 1

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1960  

Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Song Book – Volume Four

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1960  

Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Song Book – Volume Three

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1960  

Clap Hands, Here Comes Charlie!

‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Verve Records 1961  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Harold Arlen Song Book

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1961  

Ella In Hollywood

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve Records 1961  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Irving Berlin Song Book, Volume 1

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1961  

Ella

‎ (LP)

Brunswick 1961  

Sings The Irving Berlin Songbook, Volume 2

‎ (LP)

Verve Records 1961  

Ella Fitzgerald With Nelson Riddle And His Orchestra – Ella Fitzgerald Swings Brightly With Nelson ‎◄ (9 versions)

Verve Records 1962  

Rhythm Is My Business

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1962  

Ella Fitzgerald With Count Basie And His Orchestra* – Ella And Basie! ‎ ◄ (15 versions)

Verve Records 1963  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Jerome Kern Song Book

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1963  

These Are The Blues

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve RecordsVerve Records 1963  

Ella Fitzgerald with Rodgers & HammersteinLerner & LoeweAdler* & Ross*, Frank Loesser – Ella Sings Broadway ‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1963  

Hello, Dolly!

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Verve Records 1964  

Ella At Juan-Les-Pins

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve Records 1964  

Ella In Hamburg

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Verve RecordsStern Musik 1965  

Ella At Duke’s Place

‎ ◄ (8 versions)

Verve Records 1965  

Ella Fitzgerald

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Metro Records 1965  

Ella Fitzgerald With Marty Paich And His Orchestra* – Whisper Not ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1966  

Hello Ella!

‎ (LP, Album)

PolydorBertelsmann Club 1966  

Ella Fitzgerald / Duke Ellington – Ella & Duke At The Côte D’Azur Vol.2 ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1967  

Brighten The Corner

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Capitol Records 1967  

Smooth Sailing

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Decca 1967  

Ella Fitzgerald / Duke Ellington – Ella & Duke At The Côte D’Azur ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Verve Records 1967  

Ella Fitzgerald’s Christmas

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Capitol Records 1967  

Ella In Concert

‎ (LP, Album)

Verve Records 1967  

Ella Live

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1968  

30 By Ella

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Capitol Records 1968  

Misty Blue

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Capitol Records 1968  

Walkin’ In The Sunshine

‎ (LP, Album)

Sounds Superb 1968  

Ella

‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Reprise Records 1969  

Sunshine Of Your Love

‎ ◄ (12 versions)

MPS RecordsMPS Records 1969  

Things Ain’t What They Used To Be (And You Better Believe It)

‎ ◄ (9 versions)

Reprise Records 1971  

Ella A Nice

‎ (LP, Album)

CBS 1971  

Ella Fitzgerald

‎ (LP, Album, Ltd)

SupraphonGramofonový Klub 1971  

Ella Loves Cole

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Atlantic 1972  

Newport Jazz Festival Live At Carnegie Hall, July 5, 1973

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Columbia 1973  

Memories

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

MCA Coral 1973  

I Maestri

‎ (LP)

Capitol RecordsEMI 1973  

Ella In London

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Records 1974  

Joe Pass & Ella Fitzgerald – Take Love Easy ‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Pablo Records 1974  

Ella Fitzgerald At The Montreux Jazz Festival 1975

‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Pablo Records 1975  

It’s Only A Papermoon

‎ (LP)

S*R InternationalS*R International 1975  

Chick Webb And His Orchestra Featuring Ella Fitzgerald – Silver Star Swing Series Presents Chick Webb And His Orchestra ‎ (LP)

MCA Coral 1975  

Ella Fitzgerald & Chick Webb Orchestra, The* – Ella Fitzgerald & The Chick Webb Orchestra ‎ (LP)

Record International Service 1975  

Элла Фитцджеральд

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Мелодия 1976  

Ella Fitzgerald & Oscar Peterson – Ella And Oscar ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Pablo Records 1976  

Ella Fitzgerald / Joe Pass – Fitzgerald & Pass…Again ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Pablo Records 1976  

Basin Street Blues

‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Intercord 1976  

Ella Fitzgerald With Tommy Flanagan Trio, The* – Montreux ’77 ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Pablo Live 1977  

The Rodgers And Hart Song Book

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1977  

Ella Fitzgerald & Cole Porter – Dream Dancing ‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Pablo Records 1978  

Ella Fitzgerald And Nelson Riddle Orchestra, The* – The George And Ira Gershwin Songbook ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1978  

Ella Fitzgerald With Jackie Davis And Louie Bellson* – Lady Time ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Records 1978  

Lionel HamptonCount BasieDuke EllingtonElla FitzgeraldLouis Armstrong – Original History Of Jazz ‎ (2xLP, Gat)

Amati 1978  

Ella Fitzgerald And Nelson Riddle Orchestra, The* – The George And Ira Gershwin Songbook ‎ (Cass, RE, Dou)

Verve Records 1978  

Ella

‎ (2xLP)

Lakeshore Music 1978  

Fine And Mellow, Ella Fitzgerald Jams

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Pablo Records 1979  

I Grandi Del Jazz

‎ (LP)

Fabbri Editori 1979  

Ella Fitzgerald & Billie Holiday – Ella Fitzgerald Und Billie Holiday ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

AMIGA 1980  

Ella Fitzgerald And Count Basie – A Perfect Match ‎ ◄ (7 versions)

Pablo Records 1980  

Ella FitzgeraldCount BasieJoe PassNiels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen – Digital III At Montreux ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Live 1980  

The Duke Ellington Songbook

‎ (2xLP, Album, RE)

Verve Records 1980  

Ella Abraça Jobim – Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Antonio Carlos Jobim Song Book

‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Pablo Records 1981  

Webb On The Air

‎ (LP)

Jazz Bird 1981  

The Best Is Yet To Come

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Records 1982  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings Count Basie Plays With Count Basie Orchestra, The* – A Classy Pair ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Today 1982  

The Duke Ellington Songbook, Volume Two: The Small Group Sessions

‎ (2xLP, Gat)

Verve Records 1982  

Ella FitzgeraldJoe Pass – Speak Love ‎ ◄ (4 versions)

Pablo Records 1983  

Ella À Nice

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Pablo Live 1983  

The Ella Fitzgerald Set

‎ (LP, Mono)

Verve Records 1983  

Sings The Johnny Mercer Song Book

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1984  

Ella FitzgeraldDuke Ellington – The Stockholm Concert, 1966 ‎ ◄ (5 versions)

Pablo Live 1984  

Sings The Harold Arlen Song Book

‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1984  

Live And Rare

‎ (LP)

Delta Music 1984  

Ella Fitzgerald And Joe Pass – Easy Living ‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Pablo Records 1986  

The Very Thought Of You

‎ (LP)

Contour 1987  

Sentimental Journey

‎ (LP, Album)

Hallmark Records 1988  

Ella In Rome – The Birthday Concert

‎ (Vinyl, Album)

Verve RecordsGong 1988  

I’ve Got You Under My Skin

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Success 1989  

For The Love Of Ella

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Verve Records 1989  

Ella / Things Ain’t What They Used To Be (And You Better Believe It)

‎ (CD, Album)

Reprise Records 1989  

Ella Returns To Berlin

‎ (CD)

Verve Records 1991  

Элла Фитцджеральд Поёт Произведения Дюка Эллингтона / Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Duke Ellington Song Book

‎ (LP)

Мелодия 1991  

Ella Fitzgerald With Nelson Riddle And His Orchestra – Ella Swings Gently With Nelson ‎ ◄ (3 versions)

Verve Records 1993  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings Songs From Let No Man Write My Epitaph

‎ ◄ (2 versions)

Classic Records 1994  

Ella Fitzgerald Sings The George And Ira Gershwin Songbooks

‎ (4xCD, Album, RE, Dig)

Verve Records 1998  

Frank Sinatra + Ella Fitzgerald + Antonio Carlos Jobim – A Man And His Music + Ella + Jobim ‎ (DVD-A, Mono)

Warner Reprise Video 1999  

Ella Fitzgerald & Joe Pass – Sophisticated Lady ‎ (CD, Album)

Pablo Records 2001  

Sings The George & Ira Gershwin Songbook

‎ ◄ (6 versions)

Not Now Music 2010  

Newport Jazz Festival Live At Carnegie Hall, July 5, 1973

‎ (2xLP, Album, Ltd)

Analogue Productions 2012

Links

The Official Web Site of Ella Fitzgerald

Ella Fitzgerald – Music Biography, Credits and Discography : …

Ella Fitzgerald 1954Ella Fitzgerald, Brubeck, Coltrane and …

Ella Fitzgerald – PBS: Public Broadcasting Service

Ella Fitzgerald : NPR

Ella Fitzgerald @ All About Jazz

Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation

 

 

 

Concert Videos

Joe Pass & Ella Fitzgerald – Duets in Hannover 1975

Ella Fitzgerald and Oscar Peterson Live Paris Olympia 63 part II

Ella Fitzgerld Live at The Montreux Jazz Festival 1977

Ella Fitzgerald Live Jazz festival in Cannes 1958 part II

ella fitzgerald in berlin feat. freddie waits

 

 

 

Interviews

Ella Fitzgerald interview 1974

Bobbie Wygant Interviews Ella Fitzgerald

ELLA FITZGERALD BIOGRAPHY PART  Of 11

Music

iTunes – Music – Ella Fitzgerald – Apple

Ella Fitzgerald on Spotify

Amazon.com: Ella Fitzgerald: Songs, Albums, Pictures, Bios

Ella Fitzgerald – Listen to Free Music Pandora

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Ms Holliday

 

 

 

Biography

 

” The first popular jazz singer to move audiences with the intense, personal feeling of classic blues, Billie Holiday changed the art of American pop vocals forever. More than a half-century after her death, it’s difficult to believe that prior to her emergence, jazz and pop singers were tied to the Tin Pan Alley tradition and rarely personalized their songs; only blues singers like Bessie Smith and Ma Rainey actually gave the impression they had lived through what they were singing. Billie Holiday‘s highly stylized reading of this blues tradition revolutionized traditional pop, ripping the decades-long tradition of song plugging in two by refusing to compromise her artistry for either the song or the band. She made clear her debts to Bessie Smith and Louis Armstrong (in her autobiography she admitted, “I always wanted Bessie‘s big sound and Pops‘ feeling”), but in truth her style was virtually her own, quite a shock in an age of interchangeable crooners and band singers.

  With her spirit shining through on every recording, Holiday‘s technical expertise also excelled in comparison to the great majority of her contemporaries. Often bored by the tired old Tin Pan Alley songs she was forced to record early in her career, Holiday fooled around with the beat and the melody, phrasing behind the beat and often rejuvenating the standard melody with harmonies borrowed from her favorite horn players, Armstrong and Lester Young. (She often said she tried to sing like a horn.) Her notorious private life — a series of abusive relationships, substance addictions, and periods of depression — undoubtedly assisted her legendary status, but Holiday‘s best performances (“Lover Man,” “Don’t Explain,” “Strange Fruit,” her own composition “God Bless the Child”) remain among the most sensitive and accomplished vocal performances ever recorded. More than technical ability, more than purity of voice, what made Billie Holiday one of the best vocalists of the century — easily the equal of Ella Fitzgerald or Frank Sinatra — was her relentlessly individualist temperament, a quality that colored every one of her endlessly nuanced performances.

  Billie Holiday‘s chaotic life reportedly began in Baltimore on April 7, 1915 (a few reports say 1912) when she was born Eleanora Fagan Gough. Her father, Clarence Holiday, was a teenaged jazz guitarist and banjo player later to play in Fletcher Henderson’s Orchestra. He never married her mother, Sadie Fagan, and left while his daughter was still a baby. (She would later run into him in New York, and though she contracted many guitarists for her sessions before his death in 1937, she always avoided using him.) Holiday‘s mother was also a young teenager at the time, and whether because of inexperience or neglect, often left her daughter with uncaring relatives. Holiday was sentenced to Catholic reform school at the age of ten, reportedly after she admitted being raped. Though sentenced to stay until she became an adult, a family friend helped get her released after just two years. With her mother, she moved in 1927, first to New Jersey and soon after to Brooklyn.” Continue Reading

 

 

 

 

 

Discography

 

New Orleans
1947 New Orleans Jazz Crusade  
(6)
 
  Billie Holiday, Vol. 2 1950 Billie Holiday, Vol. 2    
(3)
 
 
Billie Holiday Sings
1950 Billie Holiday Sings Mercury  
(20)
 
 
An Evening with Billie Holiday
1953 An Evening with Billie Holiday Decca / Verve  
(6)
 
  Billie Holiday, Vol. 3 1954 Billie Holiday, Vol. 3 Jolly Roger Records  
(2)
 
  Music for Torching 1955 Music for Torching Clef Records  
(6)
 
  A Recital by Billie Holiday 1956 A Recital by Billie Holiday Clef Records  
(1)
 
  Jazz Recital 1956 Jazz Recital Clef Records  
(0)
 
  Velvet Moods 1956 Velvet Moods Clef Records  
(1)
 
 
Lady Sings the Blues
1956 Lady Sings the Blues album review Verve  
(213)
 
 
Songs for Distingué Lovers
1957 Songs for Distingué Lovers album review Verve / PolyGram  
(217)
 
 
Body & Soul [Verve]
1957 Body & Soul [Verve] album review Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab  
(26)
 
 
Lady in Satin
1958 Lady in Satin album review Columbia  
(129)
 
  Blues Are Brewin' 1958 Blues Are Brewin’ Universal/Decca  
(0)
 
 
Stay with Me
1959 Stay with Me album review Verve  
(11)
 
  Comes Love   Comes Love Dazzling Dames  
(0)
 
  Lady in Satin: The Centennial   Lady in Satin: The Centennial    
(0)
 
  Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra   Billie Holiday and Her Orchestra Jazz Portraits  
(0)
 
 
Dove Collection
  Dove Collection Prism Leisure Corporation (UK)  
(1)
 
  100 Years of Lady Day   100 Years of Lady Day Documents  
(0)
 
  Magic   Magic Must Have Records  
(0)

 

 

 

 

More videos

 

Jazz legend Billie Holiday enjoys revival at 100

Billie Holiday’s 10 essential recordings in celebration of 100th anniversary of jazz great’s birth

Billie Holiday – About the Singer – American Masters

Remembering Billie Holiday

Billie Holiday at 100

For Billie Holiday’s 100th Birthday, Tributes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy birthday Billie , we love you .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday Sassy 

 

 

 

 

 

Brittanica :

 

” Sarah Vaughan, in full Sarah Lois Vaughan, byname Sassy or the Divine One   (born March 27, 1924, Newark, N.J., U.S.—died April 3, 1990, Hidden Hills, Calif.), American jazz vocalist and pianist known for her rich voice, with an unusually wide range, and for the inventiveness and virtuosity of her improvisations.

Vaughan was the daughter of amateur musicians. She began studying piano and organ at age seven and sang in the church choir. After winning an amateur contest at Harlem’s famed Apollo Theatre in 1942, she was hired as a singer and second pianist by the Earl Hines Orchestra. A year later she joined the singer Billy Eckstines band, where she met Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker. Vaughan’s singing style was influenced by their instruments—“I always wanted to imitate the horns.” Gillespie, Parker, and Vaughan recorded “Lover Man” together in 1945.”

 

 

PBS Jazz – A Film By Ken Burns :

 

” During the five-year contract with Columbia that marked her rise to stardom (1949-54), she recorded often with studio orchestras and only once in a jazz context (with Miles Davis in 1950). A new contract with Mercury (1954-9) allowed her to pursue a dual career: for Mercury she made commercial discs, including her hit Broken-Hearted Melody (1958), while for EmArcy, Mercury’s jazz subsidiary, she recorded with Clifford Brown, Cannonball Adderley, the sidemen of Count Basie‘s orchestra, and other jazz musicians. She combined these activities under later contracts with Roulette, Mercury, and Columbia (1960-67). In 1971, after a five-year absence from recording, she began once again to make popular albums, occasionally employing a jazz-flavored accompaniment, as on her album with Oscar Peterson, Joe Pass, Ray Brown, and Louie Bellson in 1978. In public performances Vaughan is accompanied by a trio of piano, double bass, and drums, either alone or as the nucleus of a big band or symphony orchestra. Among the distinguished members of her group have been Jimmy Jones (1947-52; 1954-8), Roy Haynes (1953-4), Richard Davis (late 1950s-early 1960s), Roland Hanna (early 1960s), Bob James (1965-8), Jan Hammer(1970-71), Jimmy Cobb(1970-78), Andy Simpkins (from 1979), and Harold Jones (from 1980). From 1978 to 1980 the trio became a quartet under the leadership of Vaughan’s then manager, conductor, and husband, Waymon Reed. In 1987, Vaughan recorded an album of Latin-jazz songs. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

All About Jazz :

 

” In 1958, Vaughan was earning a yearly income of $230,000. In July of the following year, she scored her first million-selling hit, “Broken Hearted Melody,” with the Ray Ellis Orchestra. A hit with both black and white audiences, “Broken Hearted Melody,” which was nominated for a Grammy Award, reached number five on the pop R&B charts.

When Vaughan’s contract with Mercury ended in the fall of 1959, she signed with Roulette Records and became, over the next few years, one the label’s biggest stars. Her 1960 sessions for Roulette included “The Divine One,” arranged by Jimmy Jones and a session with Count Basie Band featuring such talents as trumpeters Thad Jones and Joe Newman and saxophonists Frank Foster and Billy Mitchell. Featured in duet numbers with singer Joe Williams, the Basie Band session produced the sides, “If I Were a Bell” and “Teach Me Tonight.” “

 

 

 

 

 

Trivia

 

” Ranked #50 on VH1’s 100 Greatest Women of Rock N Roll

Inducted into the Big Band and Jazz Hall of Fame in 1982.

Was an Honorary Memeber of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority

Biography in: “The Scribner Encyclopedia of American Lives”. Volume Two, 1986-1990, pages 854-856. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1999.

She is nominated for the 2008 New Jersey Hall of Fame for her services and contributions to Arts and Entertainment.

She was awarded a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for Recording at 1724 Vine Street in Hollywood, California.

She was interred at Glendale Cemetery (Crestwood Section, Lot 2 Grave 3) in Bloomfield, New Jersey.

She was inducted into the 2012 New Jersey Hall of Fame for her contributions to Arts and Entertainment.

She was a lifelong Democrat and during the Lyndon Johnson Administration was a frequent guest singer at The White House.

She & Clyde B. Atkins adopted a daughter in 1961, whom they named Deborah Lois (now Paris Vaughan).

She was close friends with crooner Billy Eckstine.”

 

 

 

Discography:

Sarah Vaughan
Studio albums
Live albums
Compilation albums
Other album appearances
Extended plays
Songs
Related topics

 

 

 

 

 

*A Tribute To
starSarah Vaughan

” Her voice, which has four octaves and out-classes that of most operatic sopranos, came in unequal parts, a rich middle section, a little-girl high register, and a sometimes vulgar, echoing bottom range. She uses it like a horn . . . ” wrote Whitney Balliett, in New Yorker Magazine, July, 1977. (Balliett is a writer of America’s unique art form, jazz. His criticism is esteemed by fans and colleagues wherever music is performed.)”

Happy Birthday Divine One 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

—-

Happy Birthday Rory Gallagher And Larry Carlton

 

 

    Today March 2 is the birthdate of two of the greatest guitarists to ever live : Rory Gallagher who , had he lived would have been celebrating his 67th birthday today and Larry Carlton who turns 67 . Happy Birthday to them both and thank you for your tremendous contributions to the world of music .

 

 

Rory Gallagher 

Mar 02, 1948 – Jun 14, 1995

“Tore Down” (1972) Savoy Limerick

 

 

 

Biography

” Gallagher was born in Ballyshannon, County Donegal; his father, Daniel, was employed by the Irish Electricity Supply Board, who were constructing a hydro-electric power plant on the Erne River above the town. The family moved, first to Derry City, where his younger brother Dónal was born in 1949, and then to Cork, where the two brothers were raised, and where Rory attended the North Monastery School. Their father had played the accordion and sang with the Tir Chonaill Ceile Band whilst in Donegal; their mother Monica was a singer and acted with the Abbey Players in Ballyshannon. The Theatre in Ballyshannon where Monica once acted is now called the Rory Gallagher Theatre.

Both sons were musically inclined and encouraged by their parents. At age nine, Gallagher received his first guitar from them. He built on his burgeoning ability on ukulele in teaching himself to play the guitar and perform at minor functions. After winning a talent contest when he was twelve, Gallagher began performing in his adolescence with both his acoustic guitar, and an electric guitar he bought with his prize money. However, it was his purchase three years later of a 1961 Fender Stratocaster for £100 that became his primary instrument and most associated with him for the span of his lifetime.

   Gallagher was initially attracted to skiffle after hearing Lonnie Donegan on the radio. Donegan frequently covered blues and folk performers from the United States. He relied entirely on radio programs and television. Occasionally, the jazz programs from the BBC would play some blues numbers, and he slowly found some song books for guitar, where he found the names of the actual composers of blues pieces. While still in school, playing songs by Buddy Holly and Eddie Cochran, he discovered his greatest influence in Muddy Waters. Subsequently, Gallagher began experimenting with folk, blues, and rock music. Unable to find or afford record albums, Gallagher stayed up late to hear Radio Luxembourg and AFN where the radio brought him his only exposure to the actual songwriters and musicians whose music moved him most. Influences he discovered, and cited as he progressed, included Woody GuthrieBig Bill Broonzy, and Lead Belly. Initially, Gallagher struck out after just an acoustic sound. Singing and later using a brace for his harmonica, Gallagher taught himself to play slide guitar. Further, throughout the next few years of his musical development, Gallagher began learning to play alto saxophonebassmandolinbanjo, and the coral sitar with varying degrees of proficiency. By his mid-teens, he began experimenting heavily with different blues styles. “

 

 

Tattoo’d Lady live 1975

Year   Title Label Editors’ Rating Average User Rating
1971
Rory Gallagher
Rory Gallagher Buddha Records  
(19)
1971
Deuce
Deuce Buddha Records  
(18)
1972
Live! In Europe
Live! In Europe Buddha Records  
(16)
1973
Blueprint
Blueprint Buddha Records  
(17)
1973
Tattoo
Tattoo Buddha Records  
(22)
1974
Irish Tour 1974
Irish Tour 1974 Capo Records  
(25)
1975
Against the Grain
Against the Grain Eagle / Eagle Records  
(10)
1976
Calling Card
Calling Card Buddha Records  
(24)
1978
Photo-Finish
Photo-Finish Buddha Records / Capo Records  
(11)
1979
Top Priority
Top Priority Buddha Records  
(11)
1980
Stage Struck
Stage Struck Capo / Capo Records  
(3)
1982
Jinx
Jinx Buddha Records  
(10)
1988
Defender
Defender Buddha Records  
(7)
1988
Fresh Evidence
Fresh Evidence Buddha Records  
(7)
1989   That’s Original Castle Music Ltd.  
No User Ratings
 
1992   Calling Card, Pts. 1-2 Castle Music Ltd.  
No User Ratings
 
1992   The Bullfrog Interlude Castle Music Ltd.  
No User Ratings

Nadine 1986

 

 

 


VIDEOS

 

 

Rest In Peace Rory 

 

 

 

 

 

——————————————–

Happy Birthday Larry Carlton

 

Cold, Cold” – with Robben Ford

 

 

 

Biography

” Carlton was born in Torrance, California. He started learning to play guitar when he was six years old, studying under Slim Edwards near his Torrance home. Taking an interest in jazz while at high school, his playing style was influenced by Joe PassWes MontgomeryBarney Kessel, and B.B. King. Saxophonist John Coltrane has also made a notable impression on Carlton, and Carlton’s live albums have featured cuts from Miles Davis‘ Kind of Blue.

  During the 1970s and early 1980s, Carlton was a session musician in Los Angeles, making up to five hundred recordings a year, including albums by Steely DanJoni MitchellBilly JoelMichael JacksonQuincy JonesThe Four TopsChristopher CrossBarbra Streisandthe Partridge Family, and Charly García‘s Clics Modernos. His guitar work on Steely Dan’s “Kid Charlemagne” from their 1976 LP The Royal Scam has been listed as the third best guitar solo on record by Rolling Stone Magazine. From 1971 to 1976 he played with the jazz-rock group The Crusaders. In 1977 he signed with Warner Bros. Records for a solo career. In 1979 he played guitar on Michael Jackson‘s Off the Wall. Although still relatively unknown outside his fan-base, Carlton produced six albums from 1978 to 1984, during which his adaptation of Santo Farina‘s “Sleepwalk” climbed the pop and adult contemporary charts and his 1983 LP Friends garnered a Grammy nomination. In 1979, Carlton appeared on the Grammy award winning, self-titled, debut album by Christopher Cross. Guitar great Eric Johnson also played on that same album.

His solo career took a twist in 1985 when he signed with MCA Master Series for an acoustic jazz album. The result was Alone / But Never Alone, which included a rendition of “The Lord’s Prayer“. During this time Carlton worked with musicians from around the world, including Japanese guitarist Hideshi Takatani. From 1985 to 1990 Carlton did various solo projects including the 1986 live Last Nite. He won another Grammy for his cover of the McDonald/Abrams song “Minute by Minute,” from the successful LP Discovery.”

 

 

 

Larry’s Blues

 

 

 

Year   Title Label Editors’ Rating Average User Rating
1968
With a Little Help from My Friends
With a Little Help from My Friends Edsel  
No User Ratings
1973
Playing/Singing
Playing/Singing Edsel  
No User Ratings
1977   Larry Carlton: Live MCA  
No User Ratings
1978
Larry Carlton
Larry Carlton MCA Jazz / GRP  
(2)
1979   Mr. 335 Live in Japan    
(1)
1981
Sleepwalk
Sleepwalk MCA Jazz / GRP  
(3)
1981
Strikes Twice
Strikes Twice MCA Jazz / MCA  
(2)
1983
Eight Times Up
Eight Times Up Wounded Bird  
(1)
1983
Friends
Friends MCA Jazz / MCA  
(1)
1986
Last Nite
Last Nite MCA  
(2)
1986
Alone/But Never Alone
Alone/But Never Alone MCA  
No User Ratings
1986
Discovery
Discovery MCA  
(1)
1989
Christmas at My House
Christmas at My House MCA  
No User Ratings
1989
On Solid Ground
On Solid Ground GRP/Impulse! / Universal  
(3)
1992
Kid Gloves
Kid Gloves GRP  
(1)
1993
Renegade Gentleman
Renegade Gentleman GRP  
(1)
1995
Best One
Best One Universal/MCA  
No User Ratings
1995
Larry & Lee
Larry & Lee GRP / Universal / Universal Distribution  
(4)
1996
Gift
Gift GRP / Universal  
(1)
2000
Fingerprints
Fingerprints Warner Bros.  
(1)
2000   Words + Music Warner Bros.  
No User Ratings
2001
No Substitutions: Live in Osaka
No Substitutions: Live in Osaka Favored Nations Records  
(6)
2001
Deep into It
Deep into It Warner Bros.  
(2)
2004
Sapphire Blue
Sapphire Blue Bluebird RCA / RCA  
(3)
2005
Fire Wire
Fire Wire Bluebird  
(6)
2006
I Hear Angels Calling
I Hear Angels Calling 335  
No User Ratings
2007
Live In Tokyo
Live In Tokyo 335  
(2)
2008
The Jazz King: H.M. The King Bhumibol Adulyadej Musical Compositions
The Jazz King: H.M. The King Bhumibol Adulyadej Musical Compositions Sony BMG  
No User Ratings
2010
Plays the Sound of Philadelphia
Plays the Sound of Philadelphia 335  
(1)
2010
Take Your Pick
Take Your Pick 335  
(1)
2012
Four Hands & A Heart, Vol. 1
Four Hands & A Heart, Vol. 1 335  
No User Ratings
2013
Unplugged
Unplugged 335  
(1)
 
335 Blues Master Class
335 Blues Master Class 335  
No User Ratings
 
335 Improv Master Class
335 Improv Master Class 335  
No User Ratings
    Carrying You MCA  
No User Ratings
    Hello Tomorrow MCA  
No User Ratings
    Les Incontournables du Jazz WM France  
No User Ratings
    Minute by Minute MCA  
No User Ratings
    Smiles and Smiles to Go MCA  
No User Ratings

Burnable – Live Performance

 

 

 

VIDEOS

 

 

Happy Birthday Larry Carlton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wynonie Harris-Don’t Roll Those Bloodshot Eyes At Me

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Dec 29, 2008

” Wynonie Harris, with his version of a song written by Hank Penny, Don’t Roll Those Bloodshot Eyes At Me.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Jun 29, 2007

” Larry Carlton: http://truefire.at/LarryCarlton

335 Records: http://truefire.at/335Records

YouTube: http://truefire.at/LarryCarltonYouTube

Facebook: http://truefire.at/LarryCarltonFacebook

Twitter: http://truefire.at/LarryCarltonTwitter

Larry and Robben perform “Cold Cold” live in Osaka, Japan.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Uploaded on Feb 22, 2010

” From the New Guitar Summit DVD, Live at Stoneham Theatre, available at http://www.stonyplainrecords
Features fantastic Jazz guitar from Jay Geils, Duke Robillard and Gerry Beaudoin”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daily Video 7.6.13

George Benson playing “Take Five”

 

“Trumpet Duel” – Al Hirt vs. Guido Basso (Live On “The Johnny Cash Show”, 12.16.70)

Al Hirt – The Hit Medley – Cotton Candy, Sugar Lips and Java

 

Published on Jul 27, 2012

” Al Hirt Band from Spring 1987 at the West Virginia Jazz Festival in Charleston, WV.
Al Hirt-trumpet, Dave Zoller-piano, Bill Huntington-bass & Bobby Breaux-drums. This concert was simulcast on West Virginia, Virginia and Ohio public television.

Thanks to WPBY-TV, West Virginia Public Broadcasting, Huntington/Charleston, WV. for the great video.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louis Jordan R&B Pioneer, From Reet Petite & Gone! part 1

 

Amos Milburn, Joe Turner & Cab Calloway / R&B Revue

 

” Outstanding performances abound in this musical variety show filmed at Harlem’s Apollo Theatre, New York City in 1954. We highlight different shades of the blues in this clip with Amos Milburn doing Bad Bad Whiskey, Big Joe Turner with a great version of Shake Rattle & Roll and Cab Calloway surprising everyone with a version of Minnie the Moocher
You can download the entire movie at the link below. Or watch the individual performances here at MindsiMedia.
http://www.archive.org/details/rhythm…

Larry Carlton-Robben Ford / I Put A Spell On You

Happy Birthday Rory Gallagher And Larry Carlton

    Today March 2 is the birthdate of two of the greatest guitarists to ever live : Rory Gallagher who , had he lived would have been celebrating his 65th birthday today and Larry Carlton who turns 65 . Happy Birthday to them both and thank you for your tremendous contributions to the world of music .

Rory Gallagher 

Mar 02, 1948 – Jun 14, 1995

Tore Down – Germany 1971/72


Biography

” Gallagher was born in Ballyshannon, County Donegal; his father, Daniel, was employed by the Irish Electricity Supply Board, who were constructing a hydro-electric power plant on the Erne River above the town. The family moved, first to Derry City, where his younger brother Dónal was born in 1949, and then to Cork, where the two brothers were raised, and where Rory attended the North Monastery School. Their father had played the accordion and sang with the Tir Chonaill Ceile Band whilst in Donegal; their mother Monica was a singer and acted with the Abbey Players in Ballyshannon. The Theatre in Ballyshannon where Monica once acted is now called the Rory Gallagher Theatre.

Both sons were musically inclined and encouraged by their parents. At age nine, Gallagher received his first guitar from them. He built on his burgeoning ability on ukulele in teaching himself to play the guitar and perform at minor functions. After winning a talent contest when he was twelve, Gallagher began performing in his adolescence with both his acoustic guitar, and an electric guitar he bought with his prize money. However, it was his purchase three years later of a 1961 Fender Stratocaster for £100 that became his primary instrument and most associated with him for the span of his lifetime.[7]

Gallagher was initially attracted to skiffle after hearing Lonnie Donegan on the radio. Donegan frequently covered blues and folk performers from the United States. He relied entirely on radio programs and television. Occasionally, the jazz programs from the BBC would play some blues numbers, and he slowly found some song books for guitar, where he found the names of the actual composers of blues pieces. While still in school, playing songs by Buddy Holly and Eddie Cochran, he discovered his greatest influence in Muddy Waters. Subsequently, Gallagher began experimenting with folk, blues, and rock music. Unable to find or afford record albums, Gallagher stayed up late to hear Radio Luxembourg and AFN where the radio brought him his only exposure to the actual songwriters and musicians whose music moved him most.[8] Influences he discovered, and cited as he progressed, included Woody GuthrieBig Bill Broonzy, and Lead Belly. Initially, Gallagher struck out after just an acoustic sound.[7] Singing and later using a brace for hisharmonica, Gallagher taught himself to play slide guitar. Further, throughout the next few years of his musical development, Gallagher began learning to play alto saxophonebassmandolinbanjo, and the coral sitar with varying degrees of proficiency.[9] By his mid-teens, he began experimenting heavily with different blues styles.[10] “

Tattoo’d Lady live 1975

Year Title Label Editors’ Rating Average User Rating
1971
Rory Gallagher
Rory Gallagher Buddha Records
(19)
1971
Deuce
Deuce Buddha Records
(18)
1972
Live! In Europe
Live! In Europe Buddha Records
(16)
1973
Blueprint
Blueprint Buddha Records
(17)
1973
Tattoo
Tattoo Buddha Records
(22)
1974
Irish Tour 1974
Irish Tour 1974 Capo Records
(25)
1975
Against the Grain
Against the Grain Eagle / Eagle Records
(10)
1976
Calling Card
Calling Card Buddha Records
(24)
1978
Photo-Finish
Photo-Finish Buddha Records / Capo Records
(11)
1979
Top Priority
Top Priority Buddha Records
(11)
1980
Stage Struck
Stage Struck Capo / Capo Records
(3)
1982
Jinx
Jinx Buddha Records
(10)
1988
Defender
Defender Buddha Records
(7)
1988
Fresh Evidence
Fresh Evidence Buddha Records
(7)
1989 That’s Original Castle Music Ltd.
No User Ratings
1992 Calling Card, Pts. 1-2 Castle Music Ltd.
No User Ratings
1992 The Bullfrog Interlude Castle Music Ltd.
No User Ratings

Nadine 1986


VIDEOS

Rest In Peace Rory 

——————————————–

Happy Birthday Larry Carlton 

“Cold, Cold” – with Robben Ford

Biography

” Carlton was born in Torrance, California. He started learning to play guitar when he was six years old, studying under Slim Edwards near his Torrance home. Taking an interest in jazz while at high school, his playing style was influenced by Joe PassWes MontgomeryBarney Kessel, and B.B. King. Saxophonist John Coltrane has also made a notable impression on Carlton, and Carlton’s live albums have featured cuts from Miles Davis‘ Kind of Blue.

During the 1970s and early 1980s, Carlton was a session musician in Los Angeles, making up to five hundred recordings a year, including albums by Steely DanJoni MitchellBilly JoelMichael JacksonQuincy JonesThe Four TopsChristopher CrossBarbra Streisandthe Partridge Family, and Charly García‘s Clics Modernos. His guitar work on Steely Dan’s “Kid Charlemagne” from their 1976 LP The Royal Scam has been listed as the third best guitar solo on record by Rolling Stone Magazine. From 1971 to 1976 he played with the jazz-rock group The Crusaders. In 1977 he signed with Warner Bros. Records for a solo career. In 1979 he played guitar on Michael Jackson‘s Off the Wall. Although still relatively unknown outside his fan-base, Carlton produced six albums from 1978 to 1984, during which his adaptation of Santo Farina‘s “Sleepwalk” climbed the pop and adult contemporary charts and his 1983 LP Friends garnered a Grammy nomination. In 1979, Carlton appeared on the Grammy award winning, self-titled, debut album by Christopher Cross. Guitar great Eric Johnson also played on that same album.

His solo career took a twist in 1985 when he signed with MCA Master Series for an acoustic jazz album. The result was Alone / But Never Alone, which included a rendition of “The Lord’s Prayer“. During this time Carlton worked with musicians from around the world, including Japanese guitarist Hideshi Takatani. From 1985 to 1990 Carlton did various solo projects including the 1986 liveLast Nite. He won another Grammy for his cover of the McDonald/Abrams song “Minute by Minute,” from the successful LP Discovery.”

Larry’s Blues

Year Title Label Editors’ Rating Average User Rating
1968
With a Little Help from My Friends
With a Little Help from My Friends Edsel
No User Ratings
1973
Playing/Singing
Playing/Singing Edsel
No User Ratings
1977 Larry Carlton: Live MCA
No User Ratings
1978
Larry Carlton
Larry Carlton MCA Jazz / GRP
(2)
1979 Mr. 335 Live in Japan
(1)
1981
Sleepwalk
Sleepwalk MCA Jazz / GRP
(3)
1981
Strikes Twice
Strikes Twice MCA Jazz / MCA
(2)
1983
Eight Times Up
Eight Times Up Wounded Bird
(1)
1983
Friends
Friends MCA Jazz / MCA
(1)
1986
Last Nite
Last Nite MCA
(2)
1986
Alone/But Never Alone
Alone/But Never Alone MCA
No User Ratings
1986
Discovery
Discovery MCA
(1)
1989
Christmas at My House
Christmas at My House MCA
No User Ratings
1989
On Solid Ground
On Solid Ground GRP/Impulse! / Universal
(3)
1992
Kid Gloves
Kid Gloves GRP
(1)
1993
Renegade Gentleman
Renegade Gentleman GRP
(1)
1995
Best One
Best One Universal/MCA
No User Ratings
1995
Larry & Lee
Larry & Lee GRP / Universal / Universal Distribution
(4)
1996
Gift
Gift GRP / Universal
(1)
2000
Fingerprints
Fingerprints Warner Bros.
(1)
2000 Words + Music Warner Bros.
No User Ratings
2001
No Substitutions: Live in Osaka
No Substitutions: Live in Osaka Favored Nations Records
(6)
2001
Deep into It
Deep into It Warner Bros.
(2)
2004
Sapphire Blue
Sapphire Blue Bluebird RCA / RCA
(3)
2005
Fire Wire
Fire Wire Bluebird
(6)
2006
I Hear Angels Calling
I Hear Angels Calling 335
No User Ratings
2007
Live In Tokyo
Live In Tokyo 335
(2)
2008
The Jazz King: H.M. The King Bhumibol Adulyadej Musical Compositions
The Jazz King: H.M. The King Bhumibol Adulyadej Musical Compositions Sony BMG
No User Ratings
2010
Plays the Sound of Philadelphia
Plays the Sound of Philadelphia 335
(1)
2010
Take Your Pick
Take Your Pick 335
(1)
2012
Four Hands & A Heart, Vol. 1
Four Hands & A Heart, Vol. 1 335
No User Ratings
2013
Unplugged
Unplugged 335
(1)
335 Blues Master Class
335 Blues Master Class 335
No User Ratings
335 Improv Master Class
335 Improv Master Class 335
No User Ratings
Carrying You MCA
No User Ratings
Hello Tomorrow MCA
No User Ratings
Les Incontournables du Jazz WM France
No User Ratings
Minute by Minute MCA
No User Ratings
Smiles and Smiles to Go MCA
No User Ratings

Burnable – Live Performance

VIDEOS

Happy Birthday Larry Carlton

_____

 

Louis Armstrong  August 04, 1901- July 06, 1971

 

 

Louis Armstrong was the greatest of all Jazz musicians. Armstrong defined what it was to play Jazz. His amazing technical abilities, the joy and spontaneity, and amazingly quick, inventive musical mind still dominate Jazz to this day. Only Charlie Parker comes close to having as much influence on the history of Jazz as Louis Armstrong did. Like almost all early Jazz musicians, Louis was from New Orleans. He was from a very poor family and was sent to reform school when he was twelve after firing a gun in the air on New Year’s Eve. At the school he learned to play cornet. After being released at age fourteen, he worked selling papers, unloading boats, and selling coal from a cart. He didn’t own an instrument at this time, but continued to listen to bands at clubs like the Funky Butt Hall.

 

 

 

If you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.

                                                                                                 – Louis Armstrong

QUICK FACTS

BEST KNOWN FOR

Louis Armstrong was a trumpeter, bandleader, singer, soloist, film star and comedian. He is considered one of the most influential artists in jazz history.”

 

 

Louis Armstrong › Albums, Discography

 
Louis Armstrong on PBS

From Armstrong 101, an educational publication produced by Jazz at Lincoln Center: www.jazzatlincolncenter.org.

 

 

 

Louis Armstrong House Museum

34-56 107th Street

Corona, NY 11368 
718-478-8274

 

ADDRESS

Louis Armstrong House Museum
34-56 107th Street
Corona, NY 11368 

718-478-8274

 

 

Filmography

  • Ex-Flame (1930)
  • A Rhapsody in Black and Blue (1932) (short subject)
  • I’ll Be Glad When You’re Dead You Rascal You (1932) (short subject)
  • Pennies from Heaven (1936)
  • Artists & Models (1937)
  • Every Day’s a Holiday (1937)
  • Dr. Rhythm (1938)
  • Going Places (1938)
  • Cabin in the Sky (1943)
  • Show Business at War (1943) (short subject)
  • Jam Session (1944)
  • Atlantic City (1944)
  • Pillow to Post (1945)
  • New Orleans (1947)
  • A Song Is Born (1948)
  • Young Man with a Horn (film) (1950)
  • I’m in the Revue (1950)
  • The Strip (1951)
  • Glory Alley (1952)
  • The Road to Happiness (1953)
  • The Glenn Miller Story (1953)
  • High Society (1956)
  • Satchmo the Great (1958) (documentary)
  • The Night Before the Premiere (1959)
  • The Five Pennies (1959)
  • The Beat Generation (1959)
  • La Paloma (1959)
  • Kærlighedens melodi (1959)
  • Jazz on a Summer’s Day (1960)
  • Paris Blues (1961)
  • Auf Wiedersehen (1961)
  • When the Boys Meet the Girls (1965)
  • Hello Dolly! (1969)

 

God Rest Your Soul and Thank You For the Legacy