Tag Archive: John Locke


Daily Quote 5.21.15

John Locke

 

 

” Government has no other end than the preservation of property.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daily Quote 4.17.15

John Locke

 

 

 

” Virtue is harder to be got than a knowledge of the world; and, if lost in a young man, is seldom recovered.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daily Quote 3.24.15

John Locke

 

 

 

” All men by nature are equal in that equal right that every man hath to his natural freedom, without being subjected to the will or authority of any other man … “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daily Quote 2.18.15

John Locke

 

 

 

” I have no reason to suppose that he, who would take away my Liberty, would not when he had me in his Power, take away everything else. “

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daily Quote 4.14.14

John Locke

 

AVT_John-Locke_7428

 

” [W]henever the Legislators endeavor to take away, and destroy the Property of the People, or to reduce them to Slavery under Arbitrary Power, they put themselves into a state of War with the People, who are thereupon absolved from any farther Obedience …”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daily Quote 12.24.13

John Locke

 

 

 

 

” The people cannot delegate to government the power to do anything which would be unlawful for them to do themselves.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cato Home Study Course, Vol. 1: The Ideas of Liberty

 

 

 

” The classical liberal, or libertarian, approach to morality and politics brings together related themes that will be both placed in their historical context and woven together more tightly in the coming modules. In this module, the basic ideas of individual and imprescriptible rights, spontaneous order, and the rule of law are presented and examined. Each of these ideas is implicated in the others: the spontaneous order of the free society is built on a foundation of secure individual rights, and law is intimately connected with liberty, for to be free in society is for all to be equally subjected to the same known law, a law that allows us to coordinate our activities with others and thus to create complex forms of social order. The deep roots of these ideas, reaching back into antiquity, give libertarianism a solidity other political philosophies lack.

Libertarianism draws on a multitude of different sciences, or organized bodies of knowledge, including history, philosophy, economics, sociology, anthropology, and law. Thus, “The Ideas of Liberty” devotes some attention to the status of the human sciences and to the meaning and importance of the principles of intentionality and methodological individualism in properly grounded social science. In addition to laying bare the scientific misunderstandings and equivocations that lie at the foundation of collectivist thinking, “The Ideas of Liberty” explores the relationships of the individual to the group, of action and design to order, of society to the state, of coercion to persuasion, and of “natural law” to “positive law.” The ideas of natural law, natural rights, and “self-proprietorship” are traced through history, from the ancient Greeks to modern times, and used to illuminate the proper relationships between persons and between persons and governments. There is also a careful discussion of the relationship between “rights” thinking and “utilitarianism,” which have been alleged by some philosophers to be mortal enemies. The confusion is eliminated by seeing “utility,” or good consequences, as the goal, and rights as the standard against which policies and practice are judged.

Above all, libertarian ideas are seen as emerging from a long history, rather than as springing full blown from the head of this or that particular philosopher. The treatment of the relationship between the “liberty of the ancients” and “the liberty of the moderns” by Benjamin Constant, included in the readings, is a clear statement of classical liberal thinking and a rebuttal to “communitarian” criticisms of liberal individualism.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daily Quote 4.19.13

John Locke

 

” Any single man must judge for himself whether circumstances warrant obedience or resistance to the commands of the civil magistrate; we are all qualified, entitled, and morally obliged to evaluate the conduct of our rulers. This political judgment, moreover, is not simply or primarily a right, but like self-preservation, a duty to God. As such it is a judgment that men cannot part with according to the God of Nature. It is the first and foremost of our inalienable rights without which we can preserve no other.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daily Quote 2.28.13

Today Marks The 20th Anniversary Of The Waco Siege 

Never Forget – Our Government Did This

 

 

 

John Locke

 

” Tis a Mistake to think this Fault [tyranny] is proper only to Monarchies; other Forms of Government are liable to it, as well as that. For where-ever the Power that is put in any hands for the Government of the People, and the Preservation of their Properties, is applied to other ends, and made use of to impoverish, harass, or subdue them to the Arbitrary and Irregular Commands of those that have it: There it presently becomes Tyranny, whether those that thus use it are one or many.”

 

Bill Maher: ‘A Lot’ of The Constitution is Bullsh*t

 

 

“Political philosopher HBO know-it-all pundit Bill Maher had some really intelligent phraseology to describe The Constitution of the United States:

“I mean, a lot of it is bullsh*t. I mean, the Second Amendment is bullsh*t, the way they interpret the Second Amendment. The left completely forgot how to interpret that. I mean, it really is about militias at a time when, you know, there was a battle between the states and the government. It wasn’t really about private citizens owning a handgun.”

 

 

 

” A brief survey of the literature finds that Maher is an abject ignoramus. Federalist No. 46, written by key Constitutional framer James Madison, for example, had the following to say:

It may well be doubted, whether a militia thus circumstanced could ever be conquered by such a proportion of regular troops. Those who are best acquainted with the last successful resistance of this country against the British arms, will be most inclined to deny the possibility of it. Besides the advantage of being armed, which the Americans possess over the people of almost every other nation, the existence of subordinate governments, to which the people are attached, and by which the militia officers are appointed, forms a barrier against the enterprises of ambition, more insurmountable than any which a simple government of any form can admit of. Notwithstanding the military establishments in the several kingdoms of Europe, which are carried as far as the public resources will bear, the governments are afraid to trust the people with arms. And it is not certain, that with this aid alone they would not be able to shake off their yokes.

In addition, there are the underlying rights, namely, the right to self-defense and the right of resistance. An article “Never Ask Who Should Rule: Karl Popper and Political Theory” written by scholar Andrea Pickel in 1989 described the theory of John Locke: ”

 

 

Quote of the Day

John Locke : 

 

“Freedom of men under government is to have a standing rule to live by, common to every one of that society and made by the legislative power vested in it and not to be subject to the inconstant, uncertain, arbitrary will of another man.”

Quote Of The Day

John Locke

 

“Any single man must judge for himself whether circumstances warrant obedience or resistance to the commands of the civil magistrate; we are all qualified, entitled, and morally obliged to evaluate the conduct of our rulers. This political judgment, moreover, is not simply or primarily a right, but like self-preservation, a duty to God. As such it is a judgment that men cannot part with according to the God of Nature. It is the first and foremost of our inalienable rights without which we can preserve no other.”