Tag Archive: Korea


National Geographic’s Profile Of The Dogs Of War

 

Picture of Marine Corporal John Dolezal posing with Cchaz, a Belgian Malinois

 

 

 

” Not all military dogs are suited to combat. Some wither in the heat or become too excited by the sounds of gunfire or explosions, even after they’ve been desensitized to them in training. Some are too loyal, too lazy, or too playful. Each dog is its own particular, sometimes peculiar, universe. Still, certain breeds generally do better than others on the battlefield, such as German shepherds, Labrador retrievers, and especially the Belgian Malinois, which is known for being fearless, driven, and able to handle the heat.

  But what works in a given environment may not work in another. History suggests that each battle situation calls for its own breed and tactics. Benjamin Franklin encouraged the use of dogs against the Indians. They “will confound the enemy a good deal,” he wrote, “and be very serviceable. This was the Spanish method of guarding their marches.” (Spanish conquistadores were said to have used bullmastiffs against Native Americans.)”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” During the Second Seminole War, starting in 1835, the U.S. military used Cuban-bred bloodhounds to track Indians in the swamps of Florida. Dogs were said to have guarded soldiers in the Civil War. During World War I both sides used tens of thousands of dogs as messengers. In World War II the U.S. Marines deployed dogs on Pacific islands to sniff out Japanese positions. In Vietnam an estimated 4,000 canines were used to lead jungle patrols, saving numerous lives. (Nevertheless, the military decided to leave many behind when the U.S. pulled out.)”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the whole story at National Geographic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Best (And Worst) War Movies Of All Time

 

” War movies have been around as long as cinema has existed. There is something about the horror, bravery, tragedy, and excitement of combat that has inspires filmmakers and put butts in the seats. By our thinking, a good war movie says something specific to the conflict it purports to represent. Historical accuracy is also a plus, but it’s easy to forgive some errors in the face of a good plot or overall effectiveness of a film. We limited our list to conflicts in which the U.S. fought, and we skipped a few, such as Kosovo or Grenada, that didn’t inspire many films. Of course, let us know what movies we’re missing.”

 

 

Worst Korean War Movie: MASH (1970)

” There are not many movies about the Korean War. So it’s annoying that perhaps the most famous one doesn’t actually focus on the conflict. MASH riffs on Vietnam while setting the battlefield hospital in Korea. The helicopter, introduced in Korea as a way to get casualties to hospitals, became an icon of the Vietnam War. The tales of cynical, world-weary doctors who misbehave, save lives, and gripe about the folly of war were comments on the war of the time, not the Korean conflict. The movie is much better than the TV show, though, and has an intriguing mix of comedy and bloody surgery. But these positives do not make MASH a great war movie or even a great antiwar movie. Its attitude and willingness to shock the establishment feel stuck in its time.”
See the best & worst movies of all US conflicts here … See how their choices stack up against yours 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. declines support for Asian allies in sea disputes with increasingly aggressive China

image

“The comments by Locklear reflect the
Obama administration’s policy of
“leading from behind” rather than
assertively. That posture has troubled
states in Asia that rely on the United
States and its naval power to
maintain stability, free and open
commerce, and transit.

The comments regarding Japan also
are unusual because the United
States has a mutual defense treaty
with Tokyo. However, the
administration was slow to invoke
the treaty as part of the Japan-China
spat. ”

Illustration By Gary Varvel

A Cold Shoulder for Cold-War Vets

No Respect At All 

 

 

 

 ” This weekend, Americans will honor soldiers who fought the country’s wars, from the Somme to Kandahar. In Manassas, Va., 30 miles from the nation’s capital, a parade on Saturday will honor veterans of another big war: the one that never happened.

 

The Cold War, from 1945 to the Soviet Union’s breakup in 1991, was all about avoiding total nuclear war. It turned hot in Korea and Vietnam and sparked conflicts from Lebanon to Grenada. But soldiers on duty between flare-ups didn’t do battle. When the war that wasn’t came to an end, they got no monuments, no victory medals.

 

Nor can they join the American Legion—which makes the parade of Cold War vets in Manassas a minor hot spot of its own.

 

The idea came out of Legion Post 10, a brick building with a long bar on Cockrell Road. The parade committee was in a room behind the bar one evening, talking protocol and Porta-Johns. Most were career retirees, yet 50 years after the Cuban missile crisis, the Legion’s exclusion of Cold War short-timers was on their minds.”

 

…  ‘We Were Soldiers’ Movie, Dies In Georgia

 

 

 

 

” Basil L. Plumley, a renowned career soldier whose exploits as an Army infantryman were portrayed in a book and the movie “We Were Soldiers,” has died at 92 — an age his friends are amazed that he lived to see.

Plumley fought in World War II, the Korean War and Vietnam and was awarded a medal for making five parachute jumps into combat. The retired command sergeant major died Wednesday.

Friends said Plumley, who died in hospice care in west Georgia, never told war stories and was known to hang up on people who called to interview him. Still, he was near-legendary in the Army and gained more widespread fame through a 1992 Vietnam War book that was the basis for the 2002 movie starring Mel Gibson. Actor Sam Elliott played Plumley in the film.

Plumley didn’t need a Hollywood portrayal to be revered among soldiers, said Greg Camp, a retired Army colonel and former chief of staff at neighboring Fort Benning who befriended Plumley in his later years.

“He’s iconic in military circles,” Camp said. “Among people who have been in the military, he’s beyond what a movie star would be. … His legend permeates three generations of soldiers.” “

The Medal of Honor

Above and Beyond the Call of Duty

 

 “The Medal of Honor is the nation’s highest medal for valor in combat that can be awarded to members of the armed forces.

The medal was first authorized in 1861 for Sailors and Marines, and the following year for Soldiers as well. Since then, more than 3,400 Medals of Honor have been awarded to members of all DoD services and the Coast Guard. Medals of Honor are awarded sparingly and are bestowed only to the bravest of the brave; and that courage must be well documented. The most recent Army recipients are Sgt. 1st Class Leroy A. PetryStaff Sgt. Salvatore A. GiuntaStaff Sgt. Robert J. Miller and Sgt. 1st Class Jared C. Monti.

Today on Army Live, we honor Medal of Honor recipient, Corporal Gordon M. Craig.  Cpl. Gordon’s actions during the Korean War on September 10, 1950 awarded him the highest medal in the land. Read Cpl. Gordon’s citation below:”

 

Click the link to read Cpl Craig’s citation .

Remember

MEMORIAL DAY

The military don’t start wars.  Politicians start wars.  ~William Westmoreland

Remember

Nathan Hale, Spy and State Hero

Nathan Hale, a martyr soldier of the American Revolution, was born in Coventry, Conn., June 6, 1755. When but little more than twenty-one years old he was hanged, by order of General William Howe, as a spy, in the city of New York, on September 22, 1776.”

Napoleon :

“Soldiers usually win the battles and generals get the credit for them.”

Remember

“Historians know little about Crispus Attucks, and they have constructed accounts of his life more from speculation than facts. Most documents described his ancestry as African and American Indian. His father, Prince Yonger, is thought to have been a slave brought to America from Africa and that his mother, Nancy Attucks, was a Natick Indian. The family, which may have included an older sister named Phebe, lived in Framingham, Massachusetts.”

Otto Von Bismarck :

“Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think hard before starting a war.”

Remember

“Not all of the women soldiers of the Civil War were discharged so quickly. Some women served for years, like Sarah Emma Edmonds Seelye, and others served the entire war, like Albert D. J. Cashier. These two women are the best known and most fully documented of all the women combatants.”

General Ulysses S Grant :

 “Wherever the enemy goes, let our troops go also.”

Remember

The Battle of Chickamauga    35,000 Casualties 

September 18-20, 1863

“After the Tullahoma Campaign, Rosecrans renewed his offensive, aiming to force the Confederates out of Chattanooga. The three army corps comprising Rosecrans’ s army split and set out for Chattanooga by separate routes. In early September, Rosecrans consolidated his forces scattered in Tennessee and Georgia and forced Bragg’s army out of Chattanooga, heading south.”

Albert Pike :

“What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal”

Remember

26th Colored US Pennsylvania

Giuseppe Garibaldi :

“I offer neither pay, nor quarters, nor food; I offer only hunger, thirst, forced marches, battles and death. Let him who loves his country with his heart, and not merely with his lips, follow me.”

Remember

                                     

The Spanish-American War

John “Black Jack” Pershing :

“The deadliest weapon in the world is a Marine and his rifle!”

Remember

The Argonne World War I

General George S Patton :

 “Always do everything you ask of those you command.”

Remember

D Day , Omaha Beach

General Robert E Lee

  “What a cruel thing is war:  to separate and destroy families and friends, and mar the purest joys and happiness God has granted us in this world; to fill our hearts with hatred instead of love for our neighbors, and to devastate the fair face of this beautiful world.”

Remember

The Forgotten War , Korea

Plato :

  “Only the dead have seen the end of war. “

Remember

Viet Nam

Jeane J. Kirkpatrick :

 “We have war when at least one of the parties to a conflict wants something more than it wants peace.”  

Remember

Urgent-fury-grenada-500-9

Operation : Urgent Fury

Jonathan Swift :

  “War! that mad game the world so loves to play. ” 

Remember

Operation Just Cause : Panama

 General William Westmoreland :

             ” War is fear cloaked in courage.”

Remember

Beirut October 23 , 1983

Dwight D. Eisenhower :

   “We are going to have peace even if we have to fight for it.”

Remember

The Gulf War : Operation Desert Storm

 Herbert V. Prochnow :

  “A visitor from Mars could easily pick out the civilized nations.  They have the best implements of war.”

Remember

Sergeant First Class Randall D. Shughart
Citation Reads: Rank and organization: Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army. Place and date: 3 October 1993, Mogadishu, Somalia. Entered service at: —– Born: Newville, Pennsylvania. Citation: Sergeant First Class Shughart, United States Army, distinguished himself by actions above and beyond the call of duty on 3 October 1993, while serving as a Sniper Team Member, United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu, Somalia. Sergeant First Class Shughart provided precision sniper fires from the lead helicopter during an assault on a building and at two helicopter crash sites, while subjected to intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fires. While providing critical suppressive fires at the second crash site, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader learned that ground forces were not immediately available to secure the site. Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader unhesitatingly volunteered to be inserted to protect the four critically wounded personnel, despite being well aware of the growing number of enemy personnel closing in on the site. After their third request to be inserted, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader received permission to perform this volunteer mission. When debris and enemy ground fires at the site caused them to abort the first attempt, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader were inserted one hundred meters south of the crash site. Equipped with only his sniper rifle and a pistol, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader, while under intense small arms fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members. Sergeant First Class Shughart pulled the pilot and the other crew members from the aircraft, establishing a perimeter which placed him and his fellow sniper in the most vulnerable position. Sergeant First Class Shughart used his long range rifle and side arm to kill an undetermined number of attackers while traveling the perimeter, protecting the downed crew. Sergeant First Class Shughart continued his protective fire until he depleted his ammunition and was fatally wounded. His actions saved the pilot’s life. Sergeant First Class Shughart’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest standards of military service and reflect great credit upon him, his unit and the United States Army.
Master Sergeant Gary I. Gordon
Citation Reads: Rank and organization: Master Sergeant, U.S. Army. Place and date: 3 October 1993, Mogadishu, Somalia. Entered service at: —– Born: Lincoln, Maine. Citation: Master Sergeant Gordon, United States Army, distinguished himself by actions above and beyond the call of duty on 3 October 1993, while serving as Sniper Team Leader, United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu, Somalia. Master Sergeant Gordon’s sniper team provided precision fires from the lead helicopter during an assault and at two helicopter crash sites, while subjected to intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fires. When Master Sergeant Gordon learned that ground forces were not immediately available to secure the second crash site, he and another sniper unhesitatingly volunteered to be inserted to protect the four critically wounded personnel, despite being well aware of the growing number of enemy personnel closing in on the site. After his third request to be inserted, Master Sergeant Gordon received permission to perform his volunteer mission. When debris and enemy ground fires at the site caused them to abort the first attempt, Master Sergeant Gordon was inserted one hundred meters south of the crash site. Equipped with only his sniper rifle and a pistol, Master Sergeant Gordon and his fellow sniper, while under intense small arms fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members. Master Sergeant Gordon immediately pulled the pilot and the other crew members from the aircraft, establishing a perimeter which placed him and his fellow sniper in the most vulnerable position. Master Sergeant Gordon used his long range rifle and side arm to kill an undetermined number of attackers until he depleted his ammunition. Master Sergeant Gordon then went back to the wreckage, recovering some of the crew’s weapons and ammunition. Despite the fact that he was critically low on ammunition, he provided some of it to the dazed pilot and then radioed for help. Master Sergeant Gordon continued to travel the perimeter, protecting the downed crew. After his team member was fatally wounded and his own rifle ammunition exhausted, Master Sergeant Gordon returned to the wreckage, recovering a rifle with the last five rounds of ammunition and gave it to the pilot with the words, “good luck.” Then, armed only with his pistol, Master Sergeant Gordon continued to fight until he was fatally wounded. His actions saved the pilot’s life. Master Sergeant Gordon’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest standards of military service and reflect great credit upon, his unit and the United States Army.

Mogadishu , Somalia October 1993

Thomas Jefferson :

  “I recoil with horror at the ferociousness of man.  Will nations never devise a more rational umpire of differences than force?  Are there no means of coercing injustice more gratifying to our nature than a waste of the blood of thousands and of the labor of millions of our fellow creatures?”

Remember

Bosnian Genocide

Dick Motta :

  “War is the only game in which it doesn’t pay to have the home-court advantage.” 

Remember

special forces on horseback

Afganistan

José Narosky :

  “In war, there are no unwounded soldiers.”

Remember

Invasion of Iraq

Henry Fosdick :

  “The tragedy of war is that it uses man’s best to do man’s worst.”  

Remember

All of the terrorist attacks over the past 30 odd years

Remember All Who Were Lost 

  They Were Lost For Us 

    PS: For those of you who have an interest in a conflict I left out please check out this timeline of US Wars created by the Smithsonian Institute . God Bless and please REMEMBER .

—-