Tag Archive: Machine Guns


The Pentagon Finally Details Its Weapons-For-Cops Giveaway

 

 

DoD Weapons Giveaway

 

 

Click image and scroll down for an interactive , state by state and 
county by county accounting of the DoD weapons giveaway

 

 

 

” You may have heard that the image-conscious Los Angeles Unified School District chose to return the grenade launchers it received from the Defense Department’s surplus equipment program. You probably have not heard about some of the more obscure beneficiaries of the Pentagon giveaway:

  • Police in Johnston, R.I., with a population less than 29,000, acquired two bomb disposal robots, 10 tactical trucks, 35 assault rifles, more than 100 infrared gun sights and two pairs of footwear designed to protect against explosive mines. The Johnson police department has 67 sworn officers.
  • The parks division of Delaware’s Department of Natural Resources was given 20 M-16 rifles, while the fish and wildlife enforcement division obtained another 20 M-16s, plus eight M-14 rifles and ten .45-caliber automatic pistols.
  • Campus police at the University of Louisiana, Monroe, received 12 M-16s to help protect the 8,811 students there (or perhaps to keep them in line).
  • The warden service of Maine’s Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife received a small aircraft, 96 night vision goggles, 67 gun sights and seven M-14 rifles.

  For more than 20 years, the Pentagon program that distributes surplus weapons, aircraft and vehicles to police departments nationwide received little attention or scrutiny. Defense Department officials closely guarded the details of which agencies across the country received which items.

  Then, events in Ferguson propelled the 1033 program, as the surplus distribution is called, into the public eye.”

 

Total Value of Tactical Items Distributed by Department of Defense 1033 Program

 

 

    Readers should take note of when this program really took off … 2010 . It comes as no surprise that this disastrous policy truly came into it’s own during the current administration .

 

 

 

” Flooded with calls for greater transparency, in late November, the Pentagon quietly released data that details all tactical equipment distributed through the program, and for the first time identified the agencies that received items. The data is a national gift list of high-caliber weapons, armored vehicles, aircraft and similar military equipment, all delivered for the price of shipping and often with little civilian oversight.

  The program has doled out $5 billion in equipment since 1990. Most of it was general office and maintenance equipment – shovels, copiers, computers – but the Pentagon largesse included tactical military equipment worth more than $1.4 billion, disseminated in 203,000 transfers to about 7,500 agencies. Even after Ferguson, the program continues to chug along, transferring $28 million in tactical equipment in the past three months.”

 

 

     Read the entire accounting and be sure to click the interactive link to see exactly what type of military firepower that your local authorities have received from the Feds .

   See also , The Marshall Project’s companion piece, A Department Of Defense 2014 Gift Guide : 

 

 

” Shopping for holiday gifts for your local police department, park ranger or campus security team? How about an “interim fast attack vehicle”? Or a nice grenade launcher? These are just a few of the $5 billion dollars worth of surplus items that the Defense Department has distributed to law enforcement agencies and others in its Excess Property Program, also called the 1033 program. Below is a list of gifts culled from records that the department quietly made public last month. The values are based on what the Pentagon paid when it acquired the equipment. The recipients paid only shipping.”

 

 

 

MRAP Giveaway

 

 

God save us from our own government …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How The Obama Administration Gives Away Military-Grade Weapons To Local Police

 

 

 

 

 

” In the weeks after the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., images of officers training rifles on crowds of protesters from the turrets of armored vehicles became a potent symbol of the distrust between law enforcement and citizens in Ferguson — and elsewhere.

  Now, civil rights and civil liberties advocates are calling on the Obama administration to respond to the events in Ferguson by discouraging police from relying so heavily on military equipment and tactics.

  Several federal programs are helping local law enforcement to acquire heavy weapons, either by making funds available or by providing the equipment directly. One program at the Pentagon transferred surplus military equipment worth nearly half a billion dollars to local police last year. Grants provided by the Department of Homeland Security total another $1 billion, and Holder’s department provides hundreds of millions more.

” We do not condition that money on requiring real change in policing,” said Sherrilynn Ifill of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in a press conference on Tuesday. “Taxpayer money to local police departments should come with the condition that the police take responsibility for improving.” “

 

 

Washington Post has more on the burgeoning American Police State . Read it all .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mapping The Spread Of The Military’s Surplus Gear

 

 

Police Military Gear

Click on the pic to go to interactive page and view your county’s arsenal

 

 

 

” State and local police departments obtain some of their military-style equipment through a free Defense Department program created in the early 1990s. While the portion of their gear that comes from the program is relatively small (most of it is paid for by the departments or through federal grants), detailed data from the Pentagon illustrates how ubiquitous such equipment has become. Highlighted counties have received guns, grenade launchers, vehicles, night vision or body armor through the program since 2006.”

 

NY Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ferguson Shooting: US Police Armed With 93,763 New Machine Guns

 

 

 

” If Ferguson, Missouri, looks like a war zone, that may be because its police force is armed to the teeth with military equipment. In photographs from this week’s protests, officers can be seen toting assault rifles, wearing gas masks and body armour loaded with extra ammunition magazines, and riding around in mine-resistant armoured personnel carriers.

  The militarisation of US police departments has escalated exponentially in the years since 9/11, with many local forces increasingly resembling US troops fighting overseas.

  And with the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan wound down, much of the military’s surplus equipment has been handed to domestic law enforcement agencies.

  According to a recent report by the New York Times, since 2006 US police departments have collectively acquired 93,763 machine guns; 432 mine-resistant trucks; more than 500 aircraft; thousands of pieces of camouflage and night vision gear; and hundreds of thousands of ammunition magazines, all supplied via a Department of Defence programme.”

 

Independent

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Liberal Visits Big Sandy Machine Gun Shoot – Leaves Enlightened & With A Smile 🙂

 

Liberal Reporters Discovers Gun Fun

 

 

 

 

” Machine guns, cannons, drones, exploding fish monsters, and a surprising cast of characters at Arizona’s Big Sandy Shoot.

By Terry Greene Sterling

  Kenton Tucker has shot machine guns most of his life. He owns several, including, he says, Errol Flynn’s machine gun. Tucker, a tidy, middle-aged man with a red mustache, is a principal in MG Shooters LLC, which twice a year sponsors a machine gun shoot at its secluded range in the Arizona high desert. The Big Sandy Shoot is billed as the largest in the United States. It has an unusually wide firing range that stretches for a quarter-mile; about 200 machine gunners can fire their weapons simultaneously at exploding targets and drones. During the three-day event, about 3 million rounds of ammunition are expended.

  This vast arsenal of machine guns—and their owners—are tightly regulated. Machine guns have long been among the nation’s most regulated firearms. Non-military or non-law-enforcement civilians, like the guys at the Big Sandy Shoot, are required to undergo strict background checks before the federal government allows them to buy a machine gun.

  Background checks were the cornerstone of gun control legislation that failed to pass in the Senate this year. Gun control advocates had hoped the measure had sufficient momentum to pass in the wake of Adam Lanza’s slaughter of 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012. But it didn’t, thanks to lobbying by gun industry groups. A recent Pew report says most Americans don’t think gun control legislation will pass this year.

  As gun control debates wax and wane, and despite the fact that machine guns are already subjected to some of the strictest gun control measures advocates could hope for, there’s been little scrutiny of the machine gun community to see just how well gun control works—or doesn’t—in America.

  The Big Sandy Shoot attracts hundreds of people who chafe at gun control yet seem inordinately proud that they have passed background checks that allow them to own machine guns. They’re mostly old white guys, and they’re mostly Republicans, and they hate to admit they’re Exhibit A for the efficacy of gun control.

  Machine guns are true assault weapons; they are fully automatic, meaning that one pull of the trigger fires more than one round. (Semi-automatic guns, like the ones used in many mass shootings in the United States, are not true assault weapons because they require one pull of the trigger for each round.) In the United States, machine guns have been highly regulated since passage the National Firearms Act of 1934, and a series of laws that followed tightened restrictions on machine gun owners. While most Americans can legally buy guns without background checks via private sales and gun shows, machine gun purchasers wait for months as their background checks are being processed by the feds. And while most Americans can buy modern non-assault weapons easily, machine gun owners aren’t allowed to own any machine gun manufactured after 1986. In a nutshell, unlike many gun sales in the United States, machine gun sales are carefully tracked and taxed by federal authorities.

  Tucker is wary of journalists, whom the machine gun world generally views as shills for liberals who want to disarm America. But after meeting with photographer Marie Baronnet and me in Scottsdale, he agrees to let us cover the shoot with no restrictions.

  We almost don’t make the required shooters meeting on the first day of the shoot because we take our time on the road. From Phoenix the highway winds through salmon-pink sand flats studded with cactuses to Wickenburg, famous for its dude ranches and addiction recovery centers. We cruise past curio stores and horse pastures and catch Highway 93, which knifes into the Arizona badlands. The mountains are jagged and parched.

  At Milepost 148, tourists snap pictures of Nothing, Ariz., a cluster of boarded-up, sun-chewed shacks that once housed an All Mart and a gas station. A warning is scrawled in black spray paint: “No Trespassing. Private Property. Keep Out.”

  West of Nothing we pass a biker bar, a barbecue joint, a trailer park and a log furniture store, which pretty much sums up the commercial center of downtown Wikieup, population 133. We’re well into Mohave County now, and it feels like militia country. Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh hung out with his friend and terrorism accomplice Michael Fortier in Mohave County. Jason Bush, the border vigilante condemned to die for slaughtering a 9-year-old girl and her father during a bloody home invasion, was arrested in Mohave County. About 202,000 people live in the county, which sprawls over 13,470 square miles. It’s a good place be a hermit or play war games.

  We veer right onto Trout Creek Road, follow the arrow on the white poster board sign that reads “Big Sandy Shoot.” Five miles of dusty, up-down, windy dirt road later, we descend into a valley where spectators are allowed to camp and have tailgate parties.

  We register at a folding table, then drive a rutted road leading up a steep, rocky bluff to the fabled Big Sandy Range. Camouflage nets separate dozens of shooting stations. Most are equipped with folding tables and chairs, tools, ice chests, metal ammo cans, wooden ammo boxes, and machine guns on tripods.

  The machine guns face the target area, a wide, dry wash. Dozens of white barrels—the targets—line the wash. The target area is “backstopped” first by its own eroded bank, and then a cratered hill, and then a mountain. The layers keep rogue rounds from escaping and killing a cow or coyote. Yellow police tape flaps in the wind, marking the boundary between the target area and shooting stations. The shooters have set up campsites a few feet behind their machine guns. Some will sleep in RVs, others in large trucks and tents.

  The shooters are mostly middle-aged or older white men dressed in camouflage or hunting gear, baseball caps, and dark glasses. They are gathered around Tucker, who gives last-minute safety instructions.

  When he finishes, the shooters hurry to their stations.

  A signal horn blares.

  A red flag shoots up a pole.

  Someone yells: “Fire in the hole!”

  The machine gunners start shooting, and yellow smoke sours the air. I’ve got my black-and-yellow ear protectors on but still hear the cacophony of tat-tat-tat-tat-tat-tic-tic-tic-tch-tch-tch-tch-tch-pop-pop-pop-pop-pop of the smaller machine guns interspersed with a nerve-rattling thunderous kettledrum-on-steroids sequence BAM-BAM-BAM-BAM. It’s the sound of .50-caliber machine guns, designed to flatten armored vehicles and low-flying aircraft.

  I try not to wince as I adjust my loop earrings under the ear protectors and consider the journalistic challenges ahead. I want to know how real gun control works. Who are these shooters who pass the rigorous background checks? Will they open up to me? Are they especially thin-skinned in the wake of the tragic shootings at Sandy Hook? It’s late March. Arizona is in the middle of the fray: Recently retired Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, who was shot through the head by a gunman near a Tucson-area Safeway store in 2011, and her astronaut husband, Mark Kelly, are campaigning for gun control legislation. Even Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake seems to be leaning toward the proposed legislation.

  Machine guns are already tightly regulated, but will these shooters chafe at regulation of their other guns? Looking down the firing line, I see other guns that aren’t as restricted: semi-automatic pistols and rifles. There’s also a cannon.

  A cannon isn’t technically a machine gun, since it fires one round at a time. But shooters can shoot anything at the Big Sandy Shoot, including homemade bowling ball launchers.

  I join several ear-protected onlookers staring at the cannon. Someone says it was built in 1942. We’re careful not to stand directly behind, in case it backfires.

  The cannon guy is oblivious to the attention. He’s a graceful, slender man with a cryptic smile. He looks to be in his 40s and wears a Panama hat, an immaculate sports shirt and tailored slacks, as though he’ll soon be heading off to a golf game at the club. He’s in a cannon-firing Zen trance, mechanically loading and shooting, loading and shooting, loading and shooting. Later, I ask him his name. He won’t give it. He doesn’t want to be photographed. He looks rich.

  But then again, there must be a lot of rich people here. Machine guns sell for tens of thousands of dollars, thanks to Ronald Reagan. In 1986 the Republican president signed the Firearms Owners’ Protection Act, which prohibited the general public from owning, buying, or selling machine guns manufactured after the 1986 law took effect. Broadly, the law says military and law enforcement officials can still own machine guns, but civilians can only own machine guns that were grandfathered in.

  “Machine guns available to the public are a finite resource,” Jose Wall, a special agent for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives in Phoenix, told me before I left for the shoot. “So what’s in circulation back then [1986] is in circulation now.” And that’s a little less than 100,000 machine guns, Wall told me.

  All of this explains why from the get-go the machine guns at the Big Sandy Shoot seem always to be giving the shooters trouble. Something about the way the shooters use wrenches and rubber hammers to coax the guns to shoot again reminds me of taxistas tinkering with ancient Fords in Havana.

  Kenton Tucker’s business partner in MG Shooters LLC is Ed Hope. He’s a 71-year-old retired high school teacher who owns about 30 machine guns. He’s a Democrat who voted for Barack Obama and a member of the National Rifle Association.

  Hope sits in his quad, smiling, taking a break from driving up and down the range to monitor shooters. This shoot is just so much fun, he says. He asks if I’ve seen “the fish.” I have. It’s a hollow Volkswagen Beetle-size black-and-white shark-type monster. It has nasty eyes, four upper teeth, and a long, red tongue that licks the ground. When the range is “cold” and no one is allowed to shoot, the fish monster will be loaded with explosives and towed to the target area, where the shooters will blow it up.

  Hope and Tucker have been putting on shoots for 25 years, and they know gun guys like to shoot “reactive” targets, meaning targets that explode when you shoot them. Hope and Tucker bought the Big Sandy property, which spans 1 square mile, about 10 years ago, because it is so remote that you can safely shoot and explode as many targets as you want. So far no one has been injured, Hope says. The Big Sandy shoots are a “full-time job” for Tucker and Hope, who won’t disclose earnings derived from the shoot. For Big Sandy shoots, they hire 30 people to help monitor the range, direct traffic, and sell tickets. In three days about 600 spectators will pay $25 to watch about 200 shooters, who pay $250 to shoot.

  “Most of my shooters are upper-income professionals,” Hope says. The monster .50-caliber Browning can cost $25,000, for instance, and all the government regulation is “an incredible pain.” It might take six or seven months to complete a machine gun sale, called a “transfer.” What’s more, Hope says, machine guns are “hungry and you have to feed them ammo.”

  Eric Lutfy is at the Big Sandy Shoot to sell ammunition. He has been in the “gun business” since he was 18. He lives in Laveen, Ariz., and is the president of Thunderbird Cartridge Co. Inc., a purveyor of reloading components and reloaded ammunition. Ammo is stored in neatly labeled boxes beneath a folding table behind the shooter stations. A whiteboard lists his prices: A count of 150 tracer .50-caliber rounds sells for $300, for instance.

  Reloaded ammunition is basically recycled and rebuilt ammunition. After you shoot a gun, the spent casing will fall to the ground near you. If you happen to own a reloading machine, you can prime and resize the used casing, fill it with gunpowder, and cap it with a new projectile. It’s tedious, hard work, but if you shoot a lot, it’s cheaper than buying new ammunition.

  Ammunition costs are skyrocketing, due in part to nationwide hoarding, which inflates the price of ammunition, which causes more ammo hoarding. Michael Bazinet, a spokesman for the National Shooting Sports Association, an industry group, says ammunition manufacturers now “work round the clock” to fill consumer demand. For 34 straight months, he says, gun sales have gone up, and so have attendant ammunition sales. In 2012 combined retail sales for guns and ammo totaled $6 billion.

  Gun control proponents suggest the gun industry is driving a profitable panic. They say the industry is needlessly frightening gun owners into thinking their guns and ammo will be taken from them via gun control legislation. Bazinet says it’s not true. Consumer demand simply exceeds manufacturing capability, he says. He agrees, though, that if people think “access might be limited,” they will buy more ammo and guns.

  John Watson and his friends have brought 5,000 rounds of ammo to the Big Sandy Shoot. They’ve reloaded some of the ammo at home during “loading bees.” Watson, a 69-year-old retired fire marshal and Vietnam vet who lives in the Phoenix area, also brings along a mannequin named Mary Lou.

  The mannequin is dressed like a French Resistance fighter and stands by the shooting station Watson shares with his friends. He got the mannequin from his wife’s consignment store and has been bringing her to the shoot for several years, dressing her each year in a different military uniform. Mary Lou is a fixture at the shoot, along with Watson’s plastic pink flamingoes and his 1958 Airstream.

  To Watson, the Big Sandy Shoot is “Super Bowl, Nascar, and the World Series all wrapped into one.” He has been attending the shoots since 2006, and he’s recruited friends who share a shooting station, which has a blue-tarp floor covered with spent casings. Their machine guns rest on tripods. Shawn Rhodes, a former paramedic, and Bill Rhodes, a software engineer, both wear beige MG Shooters T-shirts. Another friend, David Stevens, a theater technician (he’s a got tattoo that reads “AITA,” which stands for “Acceptance Is The Answer”), brought along two semi-automatic rifles that resemble AK-47s.”

 

 

Read the whole article …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday’s Awesome Display Of Firepower Comes Compliments Of The Brigade

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Another sample then on your way …

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That’s enough . Go see the originals , all 41 of them.

Firepower From The Brigade

 

 

 

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The obligatory second sample

 

 

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Enjoy the rest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Park Police Lost Track Of Thousands Of Weapons, Inspector General’s Report Says

 

 

” The U.S. Park Police has lost track of thousands of handguns, rifles and machine guns in what a government watchdog agency concluded is the latest example of mismanagement on a police force trusted to protect millions of visitors to the city’s iconic monuments.

There is no indication that police guns got into the hands of criminals, but the Office of the Inspector General for the U.S. Department of the Interior warned that the Park Police might not know if they had. In a scathing report, the authors said there is “credible evidence of conditions that would allow for theft and misuse of firearms, and the ability to conceal the fact if weapons were missing.”

Commanders up to and including the chief of police have a lackadaisical attitude toward firearms management,” wrote Mary L. Kendall, the deputy inspector general. “Historical evidence indicates that the indifference is a product of years of inattention to administrative detail.”

Investigators took an unusually harsh tone in part because they said similar problems found in 2008 and 2009 were never fixed — a symptom of “the decade-long theme of inaction and indifference” of top Park Police managers. The Washington Post obtained an advance copy of the report.”

 

    These people ( the Feds ) are supposed to be the ones that we should trust with firearms while we lowly citizens are to give up our own ? You must be joking .

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Choose your Weapon (40 HQ Photos)

 

choose weapon 06 13 13 920 3 Todays DAR is a Choose your Weapon (40 HQ Photos)

 

One More For Your Viewing Pleasure

 

 

choose weapon 06 13 13 920 1 Todays DAR is a Choose your Weapon (40 HQ Photos)

 

 

See The Rest

 

 

 

 

 

 

Garwood Industries M134G Minigun

 

 

 

 

” Since the mid 1960s, the Minigun has been much more of a star on the battlefield as it has on the silver screen. With its distinct sound and tremendous rate of fire, it is immediately recognizable to all, even in remote proximity. It has been over 40 years since “Puff the Magic Dragon” first flew in the skies over Southeast Asia, and with modern technology assisting in growth and change, this incredible weapon system appears to be here for many more years.

 

The M134 is commonly known as the “Minigun” regardless of manufacturer. Others simply call it a “Gatling” which was a very early model that looked similar but required a hand crank to fire, or even a combination of the two, the “Electric Gatling.”  While there are a few current manufacturers of this platform today, the one we are studying in this T&E piece is the Garwood Industries, M134G.

 

The M134 is commonly known as the “Minigun” regardless of manufacturer. Others simply call it a “Gatling” which was a very early model that looked similar but required a hand crank to fire, or even a combination of the two, the “Electric Gatling.” While there are a few current manufacturers of this platform today, the one we are studying in this T&E piece is the Garwood Industries, M134G.”

 

 

 

 

” Capable of firing in excess of 6,000 rounds per minute and designed after the M61A1 20mm Vulcan, the Minigun can inflict a devastating amount of damage in a minimal amount of time. With several rate of fire settings depending upon the model and manufacturer, there is no question that firing up to 100 rounds of 7.62x51mm NATO (.308 Win) per SECOND, for several seconds, has the potential to eliminate whatever immediate threat is being targeted. While some believe that more is better, the engineers at Garwood Industries have other ideas”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Confiscated Weaponry Edition

 

confiscated weapons 500 81 Choose your Weapon: Confiscated weapons only (94 Photos)

 

 

 

 

confiscated weapons 500 3 Choose your Weapon: Confiscated weapons only (94 Photos)

 

 

 

confiscated weapons 500 33 Choose your Weapon: Confiscated weapons only (94 Photos)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cowan Auctions Presents The Collection Of Richard “Dick” Wray *

” Cowan’s is pleased to announce the sale of the collection of firearms and militaria from the estate of Richard Wray. Wray, a Cincinnati, Ohio native and former president of The Wray Electric Company, had been a collector of firearms for over 50 years.

Included in this collection are close to 200 firearms, featuring over 90 rare, fresh-to-the-market, Class III weapons. There are no dealer samples and everything is fully transferable in accordance with NFA laws.”

 

 

    On April 30th one of the finest collections of Class III firearms in private hands will go up for auction . Bidding will be accepted in person or online . The collection is available for preview online now , just click on the page below .

   Click on the headline at the top of the page for a fantastic online photo catalog of the entire collection . 

 

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Contact our Firearms & Militaria department for additional information – firearms@cowans.com or 513-871-1670 ext. 27

NFA rules apply on all purchases of Class III weapons.

Cowan’s Auctions in Cincinnati, Ohio is a recognized dealer in Class III items and is recognized as a (63) NRA Firearms Dealer and will comply with all regulations.

Buyers are expected to know their states laws and regulations on machine guns prior to bidding.  The following states do not allow individuals to own machine guns: California, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York and Rhode Island. For more details please visit the website for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives at www.atf.gov.

The three forms necessary to fill out upon purchase of these machine guns will be supplied by Cowan’s Auctions. These forms are: 1) ATF Form #4 (and possibly ATF Form #5) 2) Fingerprint Card, and 3) ATF form 5330.20 Certificate of Compliance.

    1 Cowan’s Auction policy is that the buyer will assume all transfer fees relating to the purchase of Class III weapons. 
    2 All buyers are expected to promptly fill out paperwork and comply with all related laws and regulations.
    3 Please allow up to three months, if necessary, for paperwork to be completed to transfer a machine gun.

Cowan’s to sell over 90 Class III Weapons in April 2013 Auction!

Friday Firepower

A Buffet Of Choose Your Weapon (38 Photos)

 

 

choose weapon 02 21 13 920 31 A buffet of Choose your Weapon (38 Photos)

 

 

One more teaser 

 

 

choose weapon 02 21 13 920 14 A buffet of Choose your Weapon (38 Photos)

 

Firepower DAR In High-Res (33 HQ Photos)

 

 

 

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One more sample 

 

 

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Steady…now, Choose your Weapon (32 HQ Photos)

 

 

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One more sample to pique your interest 

 

 

choose weapon 02 07 13 920 24 Steady…now, Choose your Weapon (32 HQ Photos)

 

 

 

Click Through The Graphic

 

The Truth About assault Weapons

High School Machine Guns … Courtesy Of One Of Those Awful 1%er’s . We’ve Sure Come A Long Way , Haven’t We ?

Retropundit

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Thanks to the continuing generosity of the family of the late Col. John Jacob Astor IV, who so bravely met his end last year on the Titanic, New York schoolboys will continue to have the opportunity to learn to shoot rifles and even more powerful weapons, the Los Angeles Timesreports

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Look, It’s Choose your Weapon (41 Photos)

 

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Let’s Get Around To A Choose Your Weapon (48 Photos)

 
choose weapon 12 14 12 500 7 Lets get around to a Choose your Weapon (48 Photos)