Tag Archive: National Defense


 

Loss Leader

 

 

 

” I’m glad to see a concerned senior Army officer respond to my recent piece on the risks of brain drain inside the U.S. military. Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges undoubtedly speaks for many senior leaders in each service who feel exactly the same way about this looming challenge: “Hey, we don’t even have a problem!”

Maybe, maybe not. Frankly, I remain worried. The issue is not that the best and brightest in the military have already left. My concern is that the worst effects of the ongoing drawdown are still to come — and may well be years away. The people who must ultimately judge whether Hodges’s defense is sound are the junior officers and sergeants wrestling with tough individual decisions about staying in or leaving the service. But for the Army, now is the time to look for leading indicators and craft proactive strategies to avert what could easily become one of the worst unintended consequences of shrinking the force.

Each service will have unique challenges keeping top-drawer talent as numbers drop, budgets tighten, and opportunities to serve in combat dwindle. But the Army most of all faces a perfect storm of vexing issues. It is gradually coming down from a wartime high of nearly 570,000 troops, planning to hit 490,000 by 2017. Most Army leaders and defense analysts expect that number will decline farther — perhaps to 400,000 soldiers or less. Officer and NCO reductions — voluntary and otherwise — under that scenario could number in the tens of thousands.

At the same time it gets smaller, the Army is leaving a decade of combat that has energized the force with an unparalleled focus and sense of mission. The next Army will largely be a garrison force based almost entirely in the United States, with limited opportunities to serve abroad. Even its planned exercise program to rotate units regularly overseas is jeopardized by lack of funding. Convincing experienced combat leaders that this force will be an empowering, exciting place to serve is the ultimate challenge. The bare bones remedies Hodges outlines are not nearly adequate to the task. Fundamental change is needed. Here are a few ways to do it: “

 

 

Feds: Defense Contractor Relayed US Weapons Info

 

 

” HONOLULU (AP) — Federal authorities say a civilian defense contractor who works in intelligence at Pacific Command gave his Chinese girlfriend information on existing war plans and U.S. nuclear weapons.

Benjamin Pierce Bishop, 59, appeared in court Monday to face one count of communicating national defense information to a person not entitled to receive it and one count of unlawfully retaining national defense documents and plans. He was arrested March 15 at Pacific Command headquarters at Camp H.M. Smith in Hawaii.

Bishop gave information to the woman, a 27-year-old Chinese national, after meeting her at a conference on international military defense issues in Hawaii, according to the complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Honolulu. Authorities did not say when the conference took place but said she was in the U.S. on a student visa at the time.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” The Defense Department said in early February that it would not deploy the U.S.S. Harry Truman to the Persian Gulf, citing budget concerns relating to the looming cuts known as the sequester.

“Under the Constitution, the President is commander-in-chief and employs the force. And so we now have the President going out because of this piece of paper and this agreement. ‘I can’t do what I need to do to protect the country,'” Woodward said.

“That’s a kind of madness that I haven’t seen in a long time,” he said.

Woodward’s harsh criticism came after he stirred controversy last weekend by calling out Obama for what he said was “moving the goal posts” on the sequester by requesting that revenue be part of a deal to avert it.”

Army Planning Cuts On Family Programs

 

 

” The Pentagon has begun a “deep dive” review of more than 170 military family and recreation programs on bases worldwide to identify redundancies and efficiencies — all the while insisting that the effort is not aimed at scrapping facilities in the new era of tight budgets.

Pentagon officials said that Army daycare programs, the focus of an ongoing investigation over the hiring of more than 30 workers with criminal backgrounds Fort Meyer, Va., were also included in the 120-day task force review.

“We’re going to be peeling these back, looking for redundancies,” said Charles Milam, the acting deputy assistant secretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy, about the programs targeted for the data-driven review that he leads.

“The services are working through preparations planning for cuts,” Milam said. “[This review] has nothing to do with looming sequestration or budget cuts. There is no goal to do that.”

However, several other participants at the Family Readiness Council meeting last month suggested that sequestration would likely be a factor in Milam’s review. The military stands to lose $500 billion from planned defense spending over the next ten years should Congress fail to come to an agreement that averts sequestration cuts scheduled to start on March 1.”

Navy: Lincoln Refueling Delayed, Will Hurt Carrier Readiness

 

 

The aircraft carriers USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), USS Enterprise (CVN 65), USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) are in port at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. US Navy Photo

The aircraft carriers
 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69)
 USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77),
 USS Enterprise (CVN-65), 
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75),
 and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72)
 are in port at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. US Navy Photo

 

 

 

” The U.S. Navy will delay the refueling of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) for an unknown period because of the uncertain fiscal environment due to the ongoing legislative struggle, the service told Congress in a Friday message obtained by USNI News.

Lincoln was scheduled to be moved to Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Newport News Shipyard later this month to begin the 4-year refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH) of the ship.

“This delay is due to uncertainty in the Fiscal Year 2013 appropriations bill, both in the timing and funding level available for the first full year of the contract,” the message said.
“CVN-72 will remain at Norfolk Naval Base where the ships force personnel will continue to conduct routine maintenance until sufficient funding is received for the initial execution of the RCOH.” ”

 

 

      So the Obama administration shirks the one true responsibility of the Federal government ,  ” to provide for the common defense” in order to continue the advancement of the entitlement state … got to have those Obamaphones and free wireless for the “oppressed” but fuel for the Navy … not so much .