Tag Archive: National Geographic


The Year’s Best Drone Photography, From Eagles To Fireworks

 

 

Bali Barat National Park, Indonesia

http://www.dronestagr.am/bali-barat-national-park-indonesia/

 

 

 

” While small “drones” have raised controversy in the US, they’ve made a lasting contribution to the world of photography. A light camera and a quadcopter can capture beautiful aerial shots that might once have been difficult or impossible for most photographers. Last year, Dronestagram launched as a place for both amateurs and professionals to upload their work.”

 

 

 

 

Sofia, Bulgaria

http://www.dronestagr.am/sofia-bulgaria/

 

 

 

” This year, it opened a contest to find the very best ones. The winners, picked with the help of users and National Geographic, represent the spectrum of drone photography, from high-flying nature shots to athletic spectacles to people who are just wondering what’s up there looking at them. “Went back to my home town in the Philippines. I was flying in the park one Sunday morning when suddenly people had become really interested,” writes Jericsaniel, who captured the second-place photograph above. “Looking at this picture, I realized how happy my drone makes these people.” And the winning photographer, who deserves every bit of that accolade, has actually managed to make a drone fly with the eagles.”

 

 

See all the winners at The Verge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Geographic’s Profile Of The Dogs Of War

 

Picture of Marine Corporal John Dolezal posing with Cchaz, a Belgian Malinois

 

 

 

” Not all military dogs are suited to combat. Some wither in the heat or become too excited by the sounds of gunfire or explosions, even after they’ve been desensitized to them in training. Some are too loyal, too lazy, or too playful. Each dog is its own particular, sometimes peculiar, universe. Still, certain breeds generally do better than others on the battlefield, such as German shepherds, Labrador retrievers, and especially the Belgian Malinois, which is known for being fearless, driven, and able to handle the heat.

  But what works in a given environment may not work in another. History suggests that each battle situation calls for its own breed and tactics. Benjamin Franklin encouraged the use of dogs against the Indians. They “will confound the enemy a good deal,” he wrote, “and be very serviceable. This was the Spanish method of guarding their marches.” (Spanish conquistadores were said to have used bullmastiffs against Native Americans.)”

 

 

 

 

 

 

” During the Second Seminole War, starting in 1835, the U.S. military used Cuban-bred bloodhounds to track Indians in the swamps of Florida. Dogs were said to have guarded soldiers in the Civil War. During World War I both sides used tens of thousands of dogs as messengers. In World War II the U.S. Marines deployed dogs on Pacific islands to sniff out Japanese positions. In Vietnam an estimated 4,000 canines were used to lead jungle patrols, saving numerous lives. (Nevertheless, the military decided to leave many behind when the U.S. pulled out.)”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the whole story at National Geographic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jaguar Attacks Crocodile 

 

 

 

 

” Watch “a big hoss of a male” jaguar sneak up on an unsuspecting crocodile.

  National Geographic captured this incredible footage of a jaguar hunting down a caiman crocodile along a river in central Brazil’s Tres Irmãos River.

  The jaguar is a battle-scarred adult male that biologists have nicknamed him Mick Jaguar. While this cat can’t dance on stage like his rock n roll namesake, he does have some slick moves in his own right.”

 

Wide Open Spaces

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get Your Prepper Score

 

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Amazing Footage of Long-Range Gunfight Between Marine Spec Ops and Taliban Snipers

 

 

” Marine Special Operations Team 8222 exchanges fire with Taliban fighters in the village below. Accurate incoming rounds are heard snapping overhead.

This is part of Funker530′s ongoing documentary of the War in Afghanistan. If you want to know more about these Marines check out Level Zero Heros, which has information about their upcoming book and a special episode of National Geographic.”

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 Brit Visits All 201 States Without Flying

 

 

 

 

 

 ” A British adventurer has become the first person to travel to all 201 sovereign states in the world without flying, ending his four-year odyssey early Monday when he arrived in South Sudan, the world’s newest nation.

Graham Hughes has used buses, boats, taxis, trains, and his own two feet – but never an airplane – to travel 160,000 miles in exactly 1,426 days, spending an average of less than $100 a week.

“I love travel, and I guess my reason for doing it was I wanted to see if this could be done, by one person traveling on a shoestring,” Mr. Hughes tells the Monitor Monday by telephone from Juba, South Sudan’s capital. “I think I also wanted to show that the world is not some big, scary place, but in fact is full of people who want to help you even if you are a stranger.” “