Tag Archive: Natural law


 

 

Mountain Man Arrested For Trying To Feed Himself, Owns Judge

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mountain Man

 

 

 

” In a packed courtroom, 52-year-old Ernie Tertelgte told the judge “I am a living man protected by natural law and I have the right to forage for food when I am hungry… You are trying to create a fictitious, fraudulent action.”

Charged with fishing without a license and resisting the arrest for fishing without a license, Mr. Tertegte says he’s being wrongly prosecuted for trying to feed himself.

Tertelgte, 52 years old, was arrested on Monday and is accused of fishing without a license and then resisting arrest.

He appeared before the judge via video from the Gallatin County Detention Center, and it was standing room only more than a dozen friends and family members filled the small courtroom.
Tertelgte appeared subdued and respectful before the Justice of the Peace during Tuesday’s court session, which went very differently than his court appearance earlier this month, where Tertelgte and Three Forks City Judge Wanda Drusch got into a heated exchange.

Terteltge argued that the court did not have the authority to charge him, citing “natural law.”

He told the judge, “You are trying to create a fictitious, fraudulent action.” He continued, “I am the living man, protected by natural law.”

He then yelled, “Do not tell me to shut up! I am the living, natural man, and my voice will be heard!”

Terteltge then pointed at the flag and said, “That is the Jolly Roger, that thing you call the American flag with the golf fringe around it is the Jolly Roger, and you are acting as one of its privateers!”

 

    Mountain Man Ernie Tertelgte’s stand for natural rights should be supported by us all . We’ll have to wait until January to see how far his natural law defense gets him , but he has a point that should be heard . As a friend of his said :

 

 

” It’s we the people that run this and rule this country, not we the courts, not we the government, and if the people don’t start standing up for themselves and for each other, we are going to continue being subjects of this government.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cato Home Study Course, Vol. 1: The Ideas of Liberty

 

 

 

” The classical liberal, or libertarian, approach to morality and politics brings together related themes that will be both placed in their historical context and woven together more tightly in the coming modules. In this module, the basic ideas of individual and imprescriptible rights, spontaneous order, and the rule of law are presented and examined. Each of these ideas is implicated in the others: the spontaneous order of the free society is built on a foundation of secure individual rights, and law is intimately connected with liberty, for to be free in society is for all to be equally subjected to the same known law, a law that allows us to coordinate our activities with others and thus to create complex forms of social order. The deep roots of these ideas, reaching back into antiquity, give libertarianism a solidity other political philosophies lack.

Libertarianism draws on a multitude of different sciences, or organized bodies of knowledge, including history, philosophy, economics, sociology, anthropology, and law. Thus, “The Ideas of Liberty” devotes some attention to the status of the human sciences and to the meaning and importance of the principles of intentionality and methodological individualism in properly grounded social science. In addition to laying bare the scientific misunderstandings and equivocations that lie at the foundation of collectivist thinking, “The Ideas of Liberty” explores the relationships of the individual to the group, of action and design to order, of society to the state, of coercion to persuasion, and of “natural law” to “positive law.” The ideas of natural law, natural rights, and “self-proprietorship” are traced through history, from the ancient Greeks to modern times, and used to illuminate the proper relationships between persons and between persons and governments. There is also a careful discussion of the relationship between “rights” thinking and “utilitarianism,” which have been alleged by some philosophers to be mortal enemies. The confusion is eliminated by seeing “utility,” or good consequences, as the goal, and rights as the standard against which policies and practice are judged.

Above all, libertarian ideas are seen as emerging from a long history, rather than as springing full blown from the head of this or that particular philosopher. The treatment of the relationship between the “liberty of the ancients” and “the liberty of the moderns” by Benjamin Constant, included in the readings, is a clear statement of classical liberal thinking and a rebuttal to “communitarian” criticisms of liberal individualism.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guns And Freedom

 

” The right of the people to keep and bear arms is an extension of the natural right to self-defense and a hallmark of personal sovereignty. It is specifically insulated from governmental interference by the Constitution and has historically been the linchpin of resistance to tyranny. And yet, the progressives in both political parties stand ready to use the coercive power of the government to interfere with the exercise of that right by law-abiding persons because of the gross abuse of that right by some crazies in our midst.
When Thomas Jefferson wrote in the Declaration of Independence that we are endowed by our Creator with certain inalienable rights, he was marrying the nation at its birth to the ancient principles of the natural law that have animated the Judeo-Christian tradition in the West. Those principles have operated as a break on all governments that recognize them by enunciating the concept of natural rights.
As we have been created in the image and likeness of God the Father, we are perfectly free just as He is. Thus, the natural law teaches that our freedoms are pre-political and come from our humanity and not from the government, and as our humanity is ultimately divine in origin, the government, even by majority vote, cannot morally take natural rights away from us. A natural right is an area of individual human behavior — like thought, speech, worship, travel, self-defense, privacy, ownership and use of property, consensual personal intimacy — immune from government interference and for the exercise of which we don’t need the government’s permission.”