Tag Archive: Quotas


Generating New Revenue Streams

 

 

 

” The common reaction to a budget crisis is reducing personnel and cutting services. The focus of this article is to provide police agencies with an alternative to personnel and service reductions. This alternative could help the survival of a city and maintain or expand police service through generating new revenue streams as a proactive approach to meet the fiscal crisis of today and the uncertain future of tomorrow.

  While generating revenue streams is not new to most agencies, the focus and resources necessary to meet current and emerging public safety needs are unprecedented in law enforcement’s history. Law enforcement executives are accustomed to the ebb and flow of fiscal budgets. The current trend, however, is much more far reaching and will impact almost all cities in California and most likely all communities in the United States.

  Five years ago, the current state of the economy facing cities and counties was not even a concern. Now, however, many law enforcement agencies are facing the reality of severe budget cuts, reduced workforce, and the elimination or reduction of many law enforcement programs. Today, police chiefs are being asked to look for ways of economizing, increasing efficiency, eliminating redundancies, and finding revenue sources.

  This trend will be prompted in two possible ways. First, increasing financial pressure will require more severe budget cuts to the point that many agencies will be able to provide only basic services. Second, cities will begin to see successes at nearby agencies and look to new revenue streams as a panacea to forestall reduced services or even bankruptcy. Based on the research for this article, there is a clear presumption of need for law enforcement to generate new income streams. A first necessary step in that process is to examine possible revenue-generating ideas.
Possible New Revenue Streams

  A group of experts in the fields of city government, business, real estate, and entrepreneurship assembled in April 2008 to identify possible new income streams that could be initiated by law enforcement.2 Their suggested new revenue streams serve as an example of ideas that can be generated in a short period of time. Each idea must be weighed against the feasibility of implementation, profit potential, and appropriateness for law enforcement involvement. Their most prominent recommendations were

    • fees for sex offenders registering in a given jurisdiction,
    • city tow companies,
    • fine increases by 50 percent,
    • pay-per-call policing,
    • vacation house check fees,
    • public hours at police firing range for a fee,
    • police department-run online traffic school for minor traffic infractions,
    • department-based security service including home checks and monitoring of security cameras by police department,
    • a designated business to clean biological crime scenes,
    • state and court fees for all convicted felons returning to the community,
    • allowing agency name to be used for advertisement and branding,
    • triple driving-under-the-influence fines by the court,
    • resident fee similar to a utility tax,
    • tax or fee on all alcohol sold in the city,
    • tax or fee on all ammunition sold in, the city,
    • public safety fees on all new development in the city,
    • 9-1-1 fee per use,
    • police department website with business advertisement for support,
    • selling ride-a-longs to the public, and
  • police department–run firearm safety classes.

  In addition to concepts that may lie ahead, there are also many examples of revenue-generating ideas that have been tried and proven in actual use. “

 

 

    Yes , as this police chief acknowledges however inadvertently , it’s all about the revenue generation and less about public safety …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Officer: Bosses Target Young Drivers, Want Ticket Quotas

 

 

 

 

” A cop who said he refuses to profile young drivers for tickets has filed a lawsuit saying he’s been passed over for promotions and overtime because of his actions.

  Patrolman Robert Wysokowski, 43, of the Mendham Township Police Department filed suit Wednesday in Superior Court here under New Jersey’s Conscientious Employee Protection Act, also known as the Whistleblower Law. He seeks promotion to sergeant, punitive and compensatory damages for “all lost benefits, wages and rights,” and damages for emotional distress.

  Wysokowski contends that he has consistently met department standards on enforcement of motor vehicle laws but beginning in 2005, under now-former Police Chief Thomas Costanza, he was told he had to “increase his numbers.” The suit said that in 2005, Steven Crawford, who was then a sergeant but now is chief, advised Wysokowski to “seek out and target younger drivers for motor vehicle stops.”

” Crawford told plaintiff that it was ‘good police work,’ or words to that effect,” the lawsuit said. The complaint said superiors advised Wysokowski that he always could find an infraction when he stopped a vehicle.”

 

USA Today has more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cop Fired for Speaking Out Against Ticket and Arrest Quotas

 

 

 

 

” Auburn, Alabama is home to sprawling plains, Auburn University, and a troubling police force. After the arrival of a new police chief in 2010, the department entered an era of ticket quotas and worse.

Hanners blew the whistle on the department’s tactics and was eventually fired for refusing to comply and keep quiet. He says that each officer was required to make 100 contacts each month, which included tickets, arrests, field interviews, and warnings. This equates to 72,000 contacts a year in a 50,000 person town. His claims are backed up by audio recordings of his superiors he made. The Auburn police department declined requests to be interviewed for this story.

Former Reason staffer Radley Balko, now an investigative reporter for the Huffington Post and author of the new book, Rise of the Warrior Cop, says that this isn’t just a nuisance, it infringes on public safety.

“You have a policy that encourages police to create petty crimes and ignore serious crimes, and that’s clearly the opposite of what we want our police to be doing,” says Balko.”